Focus on Traumatic Brain Injury Research

Photo of brain MRI scan. Focus On Traumatic Brain Injury banner image.

NINDS Program Description

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when external physical forces cause damage to the brain, whether from impact, penetrating objects, blast waves or rapid movement of the brain within the skull.  Currently, TBI has three severity classifications (mild, moderate, severe) that are based primarily on the Glasgow Coma Scale.  The classification of mild TBI also includes concussion, commonly defined as a transient alteration of brain function due to exposure to external physical forces. While acute TBI can be life threatening, TBI also can have long-term sequelae including cognitive and physical disability, post-concussion syndrome (PCS), and may contribute to the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). PCS results when various symptoms of concussion last weeks, months or more than a year following concussion.  CTE is a delayed neurodegenerative disorder that results from repetitive mild injury to the brain and can only be diagnosed postmortem. Additional general information about TBI can be found at the NINDS TBI Hope Through Research website.

 

Estimates of Funding for Various Research, Condition, and Disease Categories

Research/Disease Areas* FY 2016
(Actual)
FY 2017
(Actual)
FY 2018
Estimated
(Enacted)
FY 2019
Estimated
Injury - Traumatic Brain Injury $105 $116 $122 $114

*Dollars in millions and rounded

Proceedings & Outcomes

Resources and Tools

NINDS strongly encourages researchers who receive funding from the Institute to use these common data elements (CDEs) in their clinical research.

The FITBIR Informatics System is a database developed by the Department of Defense and National Institutes of Health to share data, associated tools and methodologies. NINDS has specific FITBIR requirements for larger Clinical Research studies.

InTBIR is a cooperative international effort to coordinate clinical research activities, increase data sharing, and leverage global research opportunities.