Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page

Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page

Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the primary federal funding organization on research on autism spectrum disorder.  For information from NIMH about ASD, click here.

NIH participates in the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), a Federal advisory committee that is designed to coordinate Federal efforts and provide advice on issues related to ASD. The committee is composed of representatives from various U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies, the Department of Education, and other governmental organizations, as well as public members, including individuals with ASD and representatives of patient advocacy organizations. One responsibility of the IACC is to develop a strategic plan for ASD research, which guides research programs supported by NIH and other participating organizations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Autism Spectrum Disorder

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What research is being done?

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the primary federal funding organization on research on autism spectrum disorder.  For information from NIMH about ASD, click here.

NIH participates in the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), a Federal advisory committee that is designed to coordinate Federal efforts and provide advice on issues related to ASD. The committee is composed of representatives from various U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies, the Department of Education, and other governmental organizations, as well as public members, including individuals with ASD and representatives of patient advocacy organizations. One responsibility of the IACC is to develop a strategic plan for ASD research, which guides research programs supported by NIH and other participating organizations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Autism Spectrum Disorder

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the primary federal funding organization on research on autism spectrum disorder.  For information from NIMH about ASD, click here.

NIH participates in the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), a Federal advisory committee that is designed to coordinate Federal efforts and provide advice on issues related to ASD. The committee is composed of representatives from various U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies, the Department of Education, and other governmental organizations, as well as public members, including individuals with ASD and representatives of patient advocacy organizations. One responsibility of the IACC is to develop a strategic plan for ASD research, which guides research programs supported by NIH and other participating organizations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Autism Spectrum Disorder


Definition
Definition
Treatment
Treatment
Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Organizations
Publications
Publications
Definition
Definition

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD, sometimes called autism) is a developmental disorder that affects how people socially interact, behave, learn, and communicate. People may exhibit repetitive behaviors or narrow, obsessive interests. Not everyone with ASD will have all behaviors and its impact can range from mild to disabling. Learning and thinking can range from extremely gifted to needing severe help. ASD is called a developmental disorder since symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life. Both children and adults can have ASD. Scientists aren’t certain what causes ASD, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role.

The term ASD now refers to several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. A team of healthcare professionals with experience may be involved in diagnosing ASD. Children should be screened for developmental delays during periodic checkups and specifically for autism at 18- and 24-month well child visits.

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Definition

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD, sometimes called autism) is a developmental disorder that affects how people socially interact, behave, learn, and communicate. People may exhibit repetitive behaviors or narrow, obsessive interests. Not everyone with ASD will have all behaviors and its impact can range from mild to disabling. Learning and thinking can range from extremely gifted to needing severe help. ASD is called a developmental disorder since symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life. Both children and adults can have ASD. Scientists aren’t certain what causes ASD, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role.

The term ASD now refers to several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. A team of healthcare professionals with experience may be involved in diagnosing ASD. Children should be screened for developmental delays during periodic checkups and specifically for autism at 18- and 24-month well child visits.

Treatment
Treatment

Currently there is no cure for ASD. Treatment involves education, various therapies, and behavioral interventions and can improve a person’s symptoms and abilities. Some symptoms can be treated with medication. The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of the person. Most professionals agree that the earlier the intervention, the better.

×
Treatment

Currently there is no cure for ASD. Treatment involves education, various therapies, and behavioral interventions and can improve a person’s symptoms and abilities. Some symptoms can be treated with medication. The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of the person. Most professionals agree that the earlier the intervention, the better.

Definition
Definition

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD, sometimes called autism) is a developmental disorder that affects how people socially interact, behave, learn, and communicate. People may exhibit repetitive behaviors or narrow, obsessive interests. Not everyone with ASD will have all behaviors and its impact can range from mild to disabling. Learning and thinking can range from extremely gifted to needing severe help. ASD is called a developmental disorder since symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life. Both children and adults can have ASD. Scientists aren’t certain what causes ASD, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role.

The term ASD now refers to several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. A team of healthcare professionals with experience may be involved in diagnosing ASD. Children should be screened for developmental delays during periodic checkups and specifically for autism at 18- and 24-month well child visits.

Treatment
Treatment

Currently there is no cure for ASD. Treatment involves education, various therapies, and behavioral interventions and can improve a person’s symptoms and abilities. Some symptoms can be treated with medication. The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of the person. Most professionals agree that the earlier the intervention, the better.

Prognosis
Prognosis

For many children, autism symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Some children with ASD grow up to lead healthy, independent lives or interact well within a supportive environment. Children whose language skills regress early in life, usually before the age of 3, appear to be at risk of developing epilepsy. During adolescence, some children with autism may become depressed or experience behavioral problems.

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For many children, autism symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Some children with ASD grow up to lead healthy, independent lives or interact well within a supportive environment. Children whose language skills regress early in life, usually before the age of 3, appear to be at risk of developing epilepsy. During adolescence, some children with autism may become depressed or experience behavioral problems.

Prognosis
Prognosis

For many children, autism symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Some children with ASD grow up to lead healthy, independent lives or interact well within a supportive environment. Children whose language skills regress early in life, usually before the age of 3, appear to be at risk of developing epilepsy. During adolescence, some children with autism may become depressed or experience behavioral problems.

Definition

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD, sometimes called autism) is a developmental disorder that affects how people socially interact, behave, learn, and communicate. People may exhibit repetitive behaviors or narrow, obsessive interests. Not everyone with ASD will have all behaviors and its impact can range from mild to disabling. Learning and thinking can range from extremely gifted to needing severe help. ASD is called a developmental disorder since symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life. Both children and adults can have ASD. Scientists aren’t certain what causes ASD, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role.

The term ASD now refers to several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. A team of healthcare professionals with experience may be involved in diagnosing ASD. Children should be screened for developmental delays during periodic checkups and specifically for autism at 18- and 24-month well child visits.

Treatment

Currently there is no cure for ASD. Treatment involves education, various therapies, and behavioral interventions and can improve a person’s symptoms and abilities. Some symptoms can be treated with medication. The ideal treatment plan coordinates therapies and interventions that meet the specific needs of the person. Most professionals agree that the earlier the intervention, the better.

Prognosis

For many children, autism symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Some children with ASD grow up to lead healthy, independent lives or interact well within a supportive environment. Children whose language skills regress early in life, usually before the age of 3, appear to be at risk of developing epilepsy. During adolescence, some children with autism may become depressed or experience behavioral problems.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the primary federal funding organization on research on autism spectrum disorder.  For information from NIMH about ASD, click here.

NIH participates in the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), a Federal advisory committee that is designed to coordinate Federal efforts and provide advice on issues related to ASD. The committee is composed of representatives from various U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies, the Department of Education, and other governmental organizations, as well as public members, including individuals with ASD and representatives of patient advocacy organizations. One responsibility of the IACC is to develop a strategic plan for ASD research, which guides research programs supported by NIH and other participating organizations.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Patient Organizations
Association for Science in Autism Treatment
P.O. Box 1447
Hoboken
NJ
Hoboken, NJ 07030
Autism National Committee (AUTCOM)
3 Bedford Green
South Burlington
VT
South Burlington, VT 05403
Autism Research Institute (ARI)
4182 Adams Avenue
San Diego
CA
San Diego, CA 92116
Tel: 619-281-7165; 833-281-7165
Autism Science Foundation
3 Continental Road
Scarsdale
NY
Scarsdale, NY 10583
Tel: 949-810-9100
Autism Society of America
6110 Executive Boulevard
Suite 305
Rockville
MD
Rockville, MD 20852
Tel: 800-328-8476
Autism Speaks, Inc.
1060 State Road, 2nd Floor
Princeton
NJ
Princeton, NJ 08540
Tel: 888-288-4762; 888-772-9050 Spanish
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta
GA
Atlanta, GA 30333
Tel: 800-311-3435; 404-639-3311; 404-639-3543
Child Neurology Foundation
201 Chicago Avenue, Suite 200
Minneapolis
MN
Minneapolis, MN 55415
Tel: 612-928-6325
MAAP Services - Autism Spectrum Connection
P.O. Box 524
Crown Point
IN
Crown Point, IN 46308
Tel: 800-328-8476
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 2A32 MSC 2425
Bethesda
MD
Bethesda, MD 20892-2425
Tel: 301-496-5133
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
111 T.W. Alexander Drive
Research Triangle Park
NC
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Tel: 919-541-3345
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
6001 Executive Blvd. Rm. 8184, MSC 9663
Bethesda
MD
Bethesda, MD 20892-9663
Tel: 301-443-4513; 866-615-6464; 866-415-8051 (TTY)
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, MSC 2320
Bethesda
MD
Bethesda, MD 20892-2320
Tel: 301-496-7243; 800-241-1044; 800-241-1055 (TTY)
Publications

Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) information sheet compiled by NINDS, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Autism fact sheet compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Asperger Syndrome information prepared by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Patient Organizations