A Visionary Resource for Instilling Fundamental Principles of Rigorous Neuroscience Research Workshop

A Visionary Resource for Instilling Fundamental Principles of Rigorous Neuroscience Research Workshop

October 22, 2018
October 23, 2018

Contact: 

Devon Crawford

Contact Number: 

301-496-1917

Contact Email: 

devon.crawford@nih.gov

Location: 

Natcher Conference Center
Bethesda, MD 20894

Event Description: 

A Visionary Resource for Instilling Fundamental Principles of Rigorous Neuroscience Research workshop was held in Bethesda Maryland on October 22-23, 2018.

Numerous publications have called for more rigorous biomedical studies and for better reporting of study design, execution, analysis, and interpretation; however, many projects still fall short with respect to rigor and reporting. One potential contributing factor to this issue may be a lack of formal training for scientists in the fundamental principles of performing and reporting rigorous research. Consequently, the lack of rigorous experimental design and analysis impedes the progress of science and research attempting to reduce the burden of disease.

One goal of the workshop was to identify key elements necessary for teaching fundamental principles of rigorous research and for building an educational resource that could be widely implemented. Hopefully this will facilitate adequate education in the fundamental principles of rigorous research, which will improve the quality of biomedical research practices.

Post Event Summary: 

Day 1: October 22, 2018

Welcome by Lawrence Tabak (0:00)

Introduction by Shai Silberberg (0:19)

Keynote by Malcolm Macleod (0:27)

Session 1: Identifying Fundamental Principles of Rigorous Research (1:33)

Session 2: Instilling Principles of Rigorous Research (3:29)

Session 3: Non-Traditional Educational Tools (5:35)

 

Day 2: October 23, 2018

 

Day 2 Introduction by Devon Crawford (0:00)

Session 4: Vision of a Living Educational Resource for Students, Educators, and Scientists (0:10)

Session 5: Recommendations (2:21)

Concluding Remarks by Walter Koroshetz (3:44)