Press Releases

An itch you just can't scratch

Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Everyone knows the best way to suppress an itch is to scratch it, but for people who suffer from skin diseases like eczema, no amount of scratching can bring relief. Fortunately, help may be on the way. Scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and the University of California,...

Study in mice shows how brain ignores distractions

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
In a study of mice, scientists discovered that a brain region called the thalamus may be critical for filtering out distractions. The study, published in Nature and partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, paves the way to understanding how defects in the thalamus might underlie...
A genetic mutation implicated in ALS and FTD prevents proteins (green) from entering and exiting the cell’s nucleus (pink).

Nuclear transport problems linked to ALS and FTD

Friday, October 16, 2015
Three teams of scientists supported by the National Institutes of Health showed that a genetic mutation linked to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) may destroy neurons by disrupting the movement of materials in and out of the cell's nucleus, or...

NIH invests $85 million for BRAIN Initiative research

Thursday, October 1, 2015
The National Institutes of Health announced its second wave of grants to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, bringing the NIH investment to $85 million in fiscal year 2015.

Dormant viral genes may awaken to cause ALS

Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) discovered that reactivation of ancient viral genes embedded in the human genome may cause the destruction of neurons in some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Scientists uncover nuclear process in the brain that may affect disease

Monday, August 17, 2015
Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, was partially...

Neurons' broken machinery piles up in ALS

Wednesday, August 12, 2015
A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies.

PINK1 protein crucial for removing broken-down energy reactors

Wednesday, August 12, 2015
Cells are powered by tiny energy reactors called mitochondria. When damaged, they leak destructive molecules that can cause substantial harm and eventually kill brain cells. Scientists at the NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) showed that a protein called PINK1...

Scientists adopt new strategy to find Huntington's disease therapies

Friday, August 7, 2015
Scientists searched the chromosomes of more than 4,000 Huntington's disease patients and found that DNA repair genes may determine when the neurological symptoms begin. Partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, the results may provide a guide for discovering new treatments for...

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