Fahr's Syndrome Information Page

Fahr's Syndrome Information Page


What research is being done?

The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand the actions of the genes involved in this disorder. Finding these genes could lead to effective ways to treat and prevent Fahr's Syndrome.

Get information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Genetic Brain Disorders

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What research is being done?

The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand the actions of the genes involved in this disorder. Finding these genes could lead to effective ways to treat and prevent Fahr's Syndrome.

Get information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Genetic Brain Disorders

The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand the actions of the genes involved in this disorder. Finding these genes could lead to effective ways to treat and prevent Fahr's Syndrome.

Get information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Genetic Brain Disorders

Search Disorders

Definition
Definition
Treatment
Treatment
Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Organizations
Publications
Publications
Definition
Definition

Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of calcium in areas of the brain that control movement, including the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, dementia, seizures, headache, dysarthria (poorly articulated speech),spasticity (stiffness of the limbs) and spastic paralysis, eye impairments, and athetosis (involuntary, writhing movements). Fahr's Syndrome can also include symptoms characteristic of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, muscle rigidity, a mask-like facial appearance, shuffling gait, and a "pill-rolling" motion of the fingers. These symptoms generally occur later in the development of the disease. More common symptoms include dystonia (disordered muscle tone) and chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky movements). Age of onset is typically in the 40s or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence.

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Definition

Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of calcium in areas of the brain that control movement, including the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, dementia, seizures, headache, dysarthria (poorly articulated speech),spasticity (stiffness of the limbs) and spastic paralysis, eye impairments, and athetosis (involuntary, writhing movements). Fahr's Syndrome can also include symptoms characteristic of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, muscle rigidity, a mask-like facial appearance, shuffling gait, and a "pill-rolling" motion of the fingers. These symptoms generally occur later in the development of the disease. More common symptoms include dystonia (disordered muscle tone) and chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky movements). Age of onset is typically in the 40s or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence.

Treatment
Treatment

There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, nor is there a standard course of treatment. Treatment addresses symptoms on an individual basis.

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Treatment

There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, nor is there a standard course of treatment. Treatment addresses symptoms on an individual basis.

Definition
Definition

Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of calcium in areas of the brain that control movement, including the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, dementia, seizures, headache, dysarthria (poorly articulated speech),spasticity (stiffness of the limbs) and spastic paralysis, eye impairments, and athetosis (involuntary, writhing movements). Fahr's Syndrome can also include symptoms characteristic of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, muscle rigidity, a mask-like facial appearance, shuffling gait, and a "pill-rolling" motion of the fingers. These symptoms generally occur later in the development of the disease. More common symptoms include dystonia (disordered muscle tone) and chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky movements). Age of onset is typically in the 40s or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence.

Treatment
Treatment

There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, nor is there a standard course of treatment. Treatment addresses symptoms on an individual basis.

Prognosis
Prognosis

The prognosis for any individual with Fahr's Syndrome is variable and hard to predict. There is no reliable correlation between age, extent of calcium deposits in the brain, and neurological deficit. Since the appearance of calcification is age-dependent, a CT scan could be negative in a gene carrier who is younger than the age of 55.

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The prognosis for any individual with Fahr's Syndrome is variable and hard to predict. There is no reliable correlation between age, extent of calcium deposits in the brain, and neurological deficit. Since the appearance of calcification is age-dependent, a CT scan could be negative in a gene carrier who is younger than the age of 55.

Prognosis
Prognosis

The prognosis for any individual with Fahr's Syndrome is variable and hard to predict. There is no reliable correlation between age, extent of calcium deposits in the brain, and neurological deficit. Since the appearance of calcification is age-dependent, a CT scan could be negative in a gene carrier who is younger than the age of 55.

Definition

Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of calcium in areas of the brain that control movement, including the basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, dementia, seizures, headache, dysarthria (poorly articulated speech),spasticity (stiffness of the limbs) and spastic paralysis, eye impairments, and athetosis (involuntary, writhing movements). Fahr's Syndrome can also include symptoms characteristic of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, muscle rigidity, a mask-like facial appearance, shuffling gait, and a "pill-rolling" motion of the fingers. These symptoms generally occur later in the development of the disease. More common symptoms include dystonia (disordered muscle tone) and chorea (involuntary, rapid, jerky movements). Age of onset is typically in the 40s or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence.

Treatment

There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, nor is there a standard course of treatment. Treatment addresses symptoms on an individual basis.

Prognosis

The prognosis for any individual with Fahr's Syndrome is variable and hard to predict. There is no reliable correlation between age, extent of calcium deposits in the brain, and neurological deficit. Since the appearance of calcification is age-dependent, a CT scan could be negative in a gene carrier who is younger than the age of 55.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand the actions of the genes involved in this disorder. Finding these genes could lead to effective ways to treat and prevent Fahr's Syndrome.

Get information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Genetic Brain Disorders

Patient Organizations
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
6001 Executive Blvd. Rm. 8184, MSC 9663
Bethesda
MD
Bethesda, MD 20892-9663
Tel: 301-443-4513; 866-615-6464; 866-415-8051 (TTY)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 5C27 MSC 2292
Bethesda
MD
Bethesda, MD 20892-2292
Tel: 301-496-1752; 800-222-2225; 800-222-4225 (TTY)
National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
55 Kenosia Avenue
Danbury
CT
Danbury, CT 06810
Tel: 203-744-0100; Voice Mail: 800-999-NORD (6673)
Patient Organizations