Pages related to "Parkinson's disease"

Pages related to "Parkinson's disease"

NIH is proud to host the 7th Annual BRAIN Initiative Investigators Meeting from June 15-17. This virtual event is open to the public. Register for this free event today!

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NIH-funded study points to a common cause for many effects of the disease

By studying cells from individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a study published in Science suggests that a toxic form of the brain chemical dopamine may contribute to all forms of PD. This work was partially funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) program for Parkinson’s disease (PD) has launched a data portal to provide de-identified information collected from 4,298 PD patients and healthy controls to researchers working to develop effective therapies for the disease.

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Accelerating Parkinson’s Disease Research and Drug Development

Learn more about the AMP PD program, a public-private partnership between government, industry, and nonprofit organizations focusing on identifying and validating biomarkers for predicting Parkinson’s disease, tracking disease progression, and validating therapeutic targets.

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Trial tests if high- or moderate-intensity exercise is more effective in decreasing Parkinson’s symptoms.

NIH researchers gain better understanding of how neuropeptide hormones trigger chemical reactions in cells

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to resting tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and postural instability. These symptoms are caused by degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), one of a group of brain structures known as the basal ganglia and part of a circuit crucial for coordinating purposeful movement. This circuit relies on the chemical messenger (or neurotransmitter) dopamine, which is produced by SNc neurons.

People who take immunosuppressants less likely to develop the disease

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