Pages related to "neurodegenerative disorders"

Pages related to "neurodegenerative disorders"

A USF Health study applies a new mouse model of tauopathy, which may help identify therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases

New research details how the complex set of molecular and fluid dynamics that comprise the glymphatic system – the brain’s unique process of waste removal – are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.  These findings suggest that people who rely on sleeping during daytime hours are at greater risk for developing neurological disorders.

According to a recent analysis of data from two major eye disease studies, adherence to the Mediterranean diet – high in vegetables, whole grains, fish, and olive oil – correlates with higher cognitive function.

NIH-funded study suggests role for specific immune cells in brain disease

A new study suggests that T cells, which help the body’s immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The study, published in the journal Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

In the largest study to date of proteins related to Alzheimer’s disease, a team of researchers has identified disease-specific proteins and biological processes that could be developed into both new treatment targets and fluid biomarkers.

Sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

How Can Understanding Protein Structure Help Us Unravel the Mysteries of Misfolded Protein-based Neurodegenerative Diseases?

Dr. W. E. Moerner

2014 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry

The American Neurological Association (ANA) has announced that Sonja W. Scholz, M.D., Ph.D., an investigator at the National Institutes of Health is this year’s winner of the Soriano Lectureship.

Study of flies suggests neurodegenerative disorders may speed up aging process

To understand the link between aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, NIH scientists compared the genetic clocks that tick during the lives of normal and mutant flies. They found that altering the activity of a gene called Cdk5 appeared to make the clocks run faster than normal, and the flies older than their chronological age. This caused the flies to have problems walking or flying later in life, to show signs of neurodegeneration, and to die earlier.

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