Pages related to "myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome"

Pages related to "myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome"

By: Dr. Walter Koroshetz and Dr. Francis Collins

Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a chronic and severe disease that, according to the CDC, affects up to 2.5 million Americans, many of whom have not been diagnosed. Active NINDS efforts are underway to seek a better understanding of ME/CFS in order to treat—and ultimately prevent—this disease.

Collaborative projects will advance research and knowledge about debilitating disease

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will award four grants to establish a coordinated scientific research effort on myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). The total cost of the projects for fiscal year 2017 will be over $7 million, with support from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers that are part of the Trans-NIH ME/CFS Working Group.

In an in-depth study of how COVID-19 affects a patient’s brain, National Institutes of Health researchers consistently spotted hallmarks of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after contracting the disease.

Purpose

In 2018 the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) formed a Working Group of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NANDS) Council focused on how best to advance research on myalgic encephalomyelitis /chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). 

The Working Group, composed of scientists, clinicians, representatives from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and individuals with ME/CFS, is charged with:

New findings published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggest that specific immune T cells from people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) show disruptions in the way they produce energy.