Grantees in the News

Grantees in the News

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Walking on ice takes more than brains

Salk Institute
Thursday, January 29, 2015

Walking across an icy parking lot in winter–and remaining upright–takes intense concentration. But a new discovery suggests that much of the balancing act that our bodies perform when faced with such a task happens unconsciously, thanks to a cluster of neurons in our spinal cord that function as a “mini-brain” to integrate sensory information and make the necessary adjustments to our muscles so that we don’t slip and fall.


Brain’s On-Off Thirst Switch Identified

Columbia University Medical Center
Monday, January 26, 2015

Neurons that trigger our sense of thirst—and neurons that turn it off—have been identified by Columbia University Medical Center neuroscientists. The paper was published today in the online edition of Nature.


Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development

Washington University in St. Louis
Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.


Muscle weakness studies suggest possible therapeutic strategies

University of Colorado Denver
Tuesday, January 20, 2015

A recently published study by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and her colleagues suggests potential therapies for central core disease, a condition that can delay development of motor skills such as sitting, crawling and walking in affected infants.


New high-speed 3-D microscope -- SCAPE -- gives deeper view of living things

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science
Monday, January 19, 2015

Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new microscope that can image living things in 3D at very high speeds.


What Really Causes Brain Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury in Football and Elsewhere? University of Maryland School of Medicine Researchers Have a Surprising Answer

University of Maryland
Thursday, January 15, 2015

New Study Finds That Brain Inflammation Is a Major Treatable Cause.


Blood Test for Brain Injury May Not Be Feasible

University of Rochester
Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Complications involving the brain’s unique waste removal system – the existence of which has only recently been brought to light – may thwart efforts to identify biomarkers that detect traumatic brain injury (TBI).


Breakthrough on chronic pain: New imaging study paves way for potential new treatments

Harvard Gazette
Monday, January 12, 2015

For the first time, scientists have found evidence of neuroinflammation in key regions of the brains of patients with chronic pain, according to a new study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a Harvard affiliate.


Breakthrough on chronic pain: New imaging study paves way for potential new treatments

Harvard Gazette
Monday, January 12, 2015

For the first time, scientists have found evidence of neuroinflammation in key regions of the brains of patients with chronic pain, according to a new study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a Harvard affiliate.


Brain Scientists Figure Out How A Protein Crucial To Learning And Memory Works

Johns Hopkins Medicine
Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical “clamp” that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger.

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