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Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Sleep Disorders and Circadian Clock Disruption in Alzheimers Disease and other Dementias of Aging

Notice of Special Interest
Monday, January 10, 2022
Wednesday, November 13, 2024
R01
NOT-AG-21-051

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The aim of this Notice of Special Interest (NOSI)is to advance basic and clinical research on the causes and consequences of sleep deficiency and circadian clock dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Alzheimers disease-related dementias (ADRD), and the roles of sleep and the circadian clock as modifiers of the onset and progression of neurodegeneration.

Research on Current Topics in Alzheimer's Disease and Its Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR
Wednesday, December 22, 2021
Clinical Trials Research
Wednesday, November 13, 2024
R01
PAR-22-093

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications proposing research on current topics in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its related dementias (ADRD). Further information on the high-priority topics of interest will be announced through a series of Notices published subsequent to this FOA.

Notice of Special Interest (NOSI): Availability of Administrative Supplements for Research on Pathobiological Mechanisms of Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 Infection

Notice of Special Interest
Tuesday, December 7, 2021
Tuesday, January 25, 2022
333
NOT-OD-22-038

Funding Opportunity Purpose

To further the goals of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery (RECOVER) Initiative, the agency encourages applications for [administrative] supplements to current active NIH grants that address the urgent need to identify the pathobiological mechanisms that lead to the multiple symptoms that develop and/or persist long past the time that patients have recovered from the initial stages of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Often referred to as Long COVID, these symptoms, which can include fatigue, shortness of breath, brain fog, sleep disorders, fevers, gastrointestinal symptoms, anxiety, and depression, can persist for months and can range from mild to incapacitating. In some cases, new symptoms arise well after the time of infection or evolve over time (e.g., MIS-C). While still being defined, these effects can be collectively referred to as Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). Investigators with expertise and insights germane to COVID-19 and PASC pathobiology are strongly encouraged to apply.

Opportunities for Collaborative Research at the NIH Clinical Center (U01 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR
Friday, November 19, 2021
Friday, April 19, 2024
U01
PAR-21-343
Debra Babcock

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The goal of this program is to support collaborative translational research projects aligned with NIH efforts to enhance the translation of basic biological discoveries into clinical applications that improve health. It encourages high quality science demonstrating the potential to result in understanding an important disease process or lead to new therapeutic interventions, diagnostics, or prevention strategies within the research interests and priorities of the participating NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs). Specifically, the program seeks to broaden and strengthen translational research collaborations between basic and clinical researchers both within and outside NIH to accelerate and enhance translational science by promoting partnerships between NIH intramural investigators (e.g., those conducting research within the labs and clinics of the NIH) and extramural investigators (e.g., those conducting research in labs outside the NIH), and by providing support for extramural investigators to take advantage of the unique research opportunities available at the NIH Clinical Center by conducting clinical research projects in collaboration with NIH intramural investigators.

Pre-application: Opportunities for Collaborative Research at the NIH Clinical Center (X02 Clinical Trial Optional)

PAR
Friday, November 19, 2021
Thursday, December 14, 2023
X02
PAR-21-342

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The goal of this program is to support collaborative translational research projects aligned with NIH efforts to enhance the translation of basic biological discoveries into clinical applications that improve health. It encourages high quality science demonstrating the potential to result in understanding an important disease process or lead to new therapeutic interventions, diagnostics, or prevention strategies within the research interests and priorities of the participating NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs). Specifically, the program seeks to broaden and strengthen translational research collaborations between basic and clinical researchers both within and outside NIH to accelerate and enhance translational science by promoting partnerships between NIH intramural investigators (e.g., those conducting research within the labs and clinics of the NIH) and extramural investigators (e.g., those conducting research in labs outside the NIH), and by providing support for extramural investigators to take advantage of the unique research opportunities available at the NIH Clinical Center by conducting clinical research projects in collaboration with NIH intramural investigators.

Prodromal Synaptic and Circuit Changes that Contribute to AD/ADRD Onset and Progression (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR
Wednesday, November 3, 2021
Sunday, February 6, 2022
R01
PAR-22-059

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The purpose of this FOA is to develop and use models to investigate the contribution of synaptic activity and circuit plasticity changes to the progression of disease processes that underlie neurodegeneration in dementia. The overall goal is to understand, from a mechanistic standpoint, the earliest synaptic, circuit and network changes that contribute to AD/ADRD disease onset and pathogenesis. A better in vivo mechanistic understanding of synaptic activity and circuit plasticity changes that underlie the earliest stages of neurodegeneration in AD/ADRD should increase opportunities for developing future interventions. Utilizing technology developed in NIH BRAIN programs is encouraged, including animal-based studies that validate in vivo relevance of findings based on cell-based or organoid-based research. Applications that rely entirely on cell-based or organoid-based systems are out of scope.

Clinical Relevance of the Linkage between Environmental Toxicant Exposures and Alzheimers Disease and Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR
Wednesday, October 13, 2021
Saturday, March 12, 2022
R01
PAR-22-048

Funding Opportunity Purpose

There is consensus that environmental toxicants are a risk factor for AD/ADRD, but causality has been largely elusive. While human studies demonstrating an association of AD/ADRD with toxicant exposures are relatively abundant, there is a clear unmet need for more mechanistic research to support or refute the clinical relevance and the biological plausibility of an impact on disease initiation, progression, or modification. This is especially important for understanding the potentially modifiable causes of racial and socioeconomic inequities. The RFA will encourage neuroscientists to conduct mechanistic AD/ADRD research on the actions of neurotoxicants on the nervous system. The scope of research includes but is not limited to in silico modeling, in vitro assay development to correlate chemical exposure to AD/ADRD biology, and in vivo studies on the modification of known AD/ADRD targets by neurotoxicants of concern, and conversely, whether known targets for these neurotoxins play a role in the etiology of AD/ADRD. The development and validation of neuropathological, neurophysiological, and neurobehavioral animal models that simulate potential toxicant exposures in humans would be one goal, and when possible, these studies will include comparisons of exposures across the lifespan.

Clinical Relevance of the Linkage between Environmental Toxicant Exposures and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR
Wednesday, October 13, 2021
Neural Exposome, ONETOX
Saturday, March 12, 2022
R01
PAR-22-048
David A. Jett

Funding Opportunity Purpose

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports mechanistic and early translational research focused on a more rigorous in-depth examination of the potential interactions of environmental toxins with genetic and non-genetic molecular targets known to influence Alzheimer's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease Related Dementias (AD/ADRD). It is expected that these studies will address the clinical relevance of these exposures on disease initiation, progression, or modification. Anticipated outcomes include an improved understanding of neurological mechanisms of chemical toxicities related to AD/ADRD, more evidence-based potential biomarkers of exposure and toxicity for those most at risk, as well as more data to support causality and potential approaches for mitigation. The scope of research includes mechanistic studies on the modification of known AD/ADRD targets by neurotoxins of concern, and conversely, whether known targets for these neurotoxins play a role in etiologies of AD/ADRD. The development and validation of neuropathological, neurophysiological and neurobehavioral animal models that simulate potential toxin exposures in humans is another example of supported studies. Preclinical studies of interactions of environmental toxicant with AD/ADRD in pilot human subject studies (that do not meet the NIH definition of clinical trial) are appropriate for this FOA. Interdisciplinary collaboration is required to address the various fields of study related to this research, e.g., neuroscience, aging, and environmental health sciences.

Role of Astrocytes in Degeneration of the Neurovascular Unit in AD/ADRDs (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR
Thursday, September 30, 2021
Saturday, February 5, 2022
R01
PAR-22-037

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The neurovascular unit involves multiple pathways that contribute to neurodegeneration. Astrocytes, due to their overlapping roles regulating the blood brain barrier, neuronal health and response to degenerating cells, are uniquely positioned to be therapeutic targets. Astrocytes are a fundamental component of the neurovascular unit and are known to play a role in regulating the blood brain barrier and APOE signaling. However, the mechanistic role of astrocytes for the neurovascular unit in health and disease, including in vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) and across the spectrum of AD/ADRD diagnoses, is largely unknown, and represents a gap area and an opportunity for research investment. This initiative would represent the first targeted initiative on the fundamental role of astrocytes in AD/ADRD at the NIH.

NINDS Institutional AD/ADRD Research Training Program (T32 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

PAR
Monday, September 27, 2021
Sunday, May 26, 2024
T32
PAR-22-021

Funding Opportunity Purpose

The purpose of this FOA is to provide support for institutional research training programs in Alzheimers Disease/Alzheimers Disease-Related Dementias (AD/ADRD). These institutional research training programs should produce well-trained neuroscientists who leave the program with the research skills and scientific knowledge to make a significant contribution to research on AD/ADRD cognitive impairment and dementia. Programs should be designed to enhance the breadth and depth of training across the spectrum AD/ADRD research areas (e.g. AD, Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), Fronto-temporal Dementia (FTD) and mixed dementias) by incorporating didactic, research and career development components within this theme into a program that fosters exceptional research skills and knowledge. Programs may support basic, clinical and/or translational research. Programs supported by this FOA must include formal components to ensure a thorough understanding of experimental design, statistical principles and methodological approaches, analytical skills, and skills for communicating science, both orally and in writing, to a wide variety of audiences. All programs are expected to design and/or provide opportunities and activities that will foster the development of quantitative literacy and the application of quantitative approaches to the trainees' research. These training programs are intended to be 2 years in duration and support training of one or more of the following groups: dissertation stage predoctoral students in their 3rd and/or 4th year of graduate school, postdoctoral fellows and fellowship-stage clinicians. (NINDS does not support first or second year graduate students under this FOA).

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