Spinal-Cord-Injury-Information-Page

Spinal-Cord-Injury-Information-Page

Spinal Cord Injury Information Page

What research is being done?

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and those at other institutes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research to better understand SCI and how to treat it.  

Current research on SCI focuses on advancing our understanding of four key principles of spinal cord repair:

  • Neuroprotection—preventing cell death and protecting surviving nerve cells from further damage, such as drugs to reduce nerve cell death and controlled lowering of the body’s core temperature to reduce cell and blood vessel damage and improve functional outcome.
  • Repair and regeneration—encouraging the spinal cord’s intrinsic ability to self-repair and stimulating the regrowth of nerve cell projections (axons) and targeting their connections appropriately, including cell transplants, natural growth-promoting substances, and bioengineered growth scaffolds that allow axons to bridge across the injury site and rebuild neural circuits.
  • Cell-based therapies—replacing damaged nerve or support cells with other cell types, including stem cells, to regenerate neuronal growth and create new cell connections.
  • Retraining central nervous system circuits to restore body functions and form new nerve connections and pathways following injury or cell death (called neuroplasticity) through techniques including rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, robot-assisted training, and brain-computer interface technology that may help with voluntary muscle movement and coordination.

Basic spinal cord function research studies how the normal spinal cord develops, processes sensory information, controls movement, and generates rhythmic patterns (like walking and breathing). Research on injury mechanisms focuses on what causes immediate harm and on the cascade of helpful and harmful bodily reactions that protect from or contribute to damage in the hours and days following a spinal cord injury.  Neural engineering strategies also offer ways to restore communication and independence.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Spinal Cord Injuries
 

×
What research is being done?

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and those at other institutes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research to better understand SCI and how to treat it.  

Current research on SCI focuses on advancing our understanding of four key principles of spinal cord repair:

  • Neuroprotection—preventing cell death and protecting surviving nerve cells from further damage, such as drugs to reduce nerve cell death and controlled lowering of the body’s core temperature to reduce cell and blood vessel damage and improve functional outcome.
  • Repair and regeneration—encouraging the spinal cord’s intrinsic ability to self-repair and stimulating the regrowth of nerve cell projections (axons) and targeting their connections appropriately, including cell transplants, natural growth-promoting substances, and bioengineered growth scaffolds that allow axons to bridge across the injury site and rebuild neural circuits.
  • Cell-based therapies—replacing damaged nerve or support cells with other cell types, including stem cells, to regenerate neuronal growth and create new cell connections.
  • Retraining central nervous system circuits to restore body functions and form new nerve connections and pathways following injury or cell death (called neuroplasticity) through techniques including rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, robot-assisted training, and brain-computer interface technology that may help with voluntary muscle movement and coordination.

Basic spinal cord function research studies how the normal spinal cord develops, processes sensory information, controls movement, and generates rhythmic patterns (like walking and breathing). Research on injury mechanisms focuses on what causes immediate harm and on the cascade of helpful and harmful bodily reactions that protect from or contribute to damage in the hours and days following a spinal cord injury.  Neural engineering strategies also offer ways to restore communication and independence.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Spinal Cord Injuries
 

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and those at other institutes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research to better understand SCI and how to treat it.  

Current research on SCI focuses on advancing our understanding of four key principles of spinal cord repair:

  • Neuroprotection—preventing cell death and protecting surviving nerve cells from further damage, such as drugs to reduce nerve cell death and controlled lowering of the body’s core temperature to reduce cell and blood vessel damage and improve functional outcome.
  • Repair and regeneration—encouraging the spinal cord’s intrinsic ability to self-repair and stimulating the regrowth of nerve cell projections (axons) and targeting their connections appropriately, including cell transplants, natural growth-promoting substances, and bioengineered growth scaffolds that allow axons to bridge across the injury site and rebuild neural circuits.
  • Cell-based therapies—replacing damaged nerve or support cells with other cell types, including stem cells, to regenerate neuronal growth and create new cell connections.
  • Retraining central nervous system circuits to restore body functions and form new nerve connections and pathways following injury or cell death (called neuroplasticity) through techniques including rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, robot-assisted training, and brain-computer interface technology that may help with voluntary muscle movement and coordination.

Basic spinal cord function research studies how the normal spinal cord develops, processes sensory information, controls movement, and generates rhythmic patterns (like walking and breathing). Research on injury mechanisms focuses on what causes immediate harm and on the cascade of helpful and harmful bodily reactions that protect from or contribute to damage in the hours and days following a spinal cord injury.  Neural engineering strategies also offer ways to restore communication and independence.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Spinal Cord Injuries
 


Definition
Definition
Treatment
Treatment
Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Organizations
Publications
Publications

Spasticity information sheet compiled by NINDS, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Myoclonus fact sheet compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).