Guillain-Barré-Syndrome-Information-Page

Guillain-Barré Syndrome Information Page


What research is being done?

Scientists are concentrating on finding new treatments and refining existing ones. Scientists are also looking at the workings of the immune system to find which cells are responsible for beginning and carrying out the attack on the nervous system. The fact that so many cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome begin after a viral or bacterial infection suggests that certain characteristics of some viruses and bacteria may activate the immune system inappropriately, and investigators are searching for those characteristics. Some studies show that normal variations in certain genes could increase the risk of developing GBS; however, more research is needed to identify and confirm associated genes. Using an animal model, scientists hope to identify which proteins in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are at greatest risk of autoimmune attack and which components of the immune system contribute to the autoimmune response against the PNS.  A greater understanding of how the immune system damages the PNS could lead to better treatments for autoimmune disorders such as GBS.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Guillain-Barre Syndrome

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What research is being done?

Scientists are concentrating on finding new treatments and refining existing ones. Scientists are also looking at the workings of the immune system to find which cells are responsible for beginning and carrying out the attack on the nervous system. The fact that so many cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome begin after a viral or bacterial infection suggests that certain characteristics of some viruses and bacteria may activate the immune system inappropriately, and investigators are searching for those characteristics. Some studies show that normal variations in certain genes could increase the risk of developing GBS; however, more research is needed to identify and confirm associated genes. Using an animal model, scientists hope to identify which proteins in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are at greatest risk of autoimmune attack and which components of the immune system contribute to the autoimmune response against the PNS.  A greater understanding of how the immune system damages the PNS could lead to better treatments for autoimmune disorders such as GBS.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Scientists are concentrating on finding new treatments and refining existing ones. Scientists are also looking at the workings of the immune system to find which cells are responsible for beginning and carrying out the attack on the nervous system. The fact that so many cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome begin after a viral or bacterial infection suggests that certain characteristics of some viruses and bacteria may activate the immune system inappropriately, and investigators are searching for those characteristics. Some studies show that normal variations in certain genes could increase the risk of developing GBS; however, more research is needed to identify and confirm associated genes. Using an animal model, scientists hope to identify which proteins in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are at greatest risk of autoimmune attack and which components of the immune system contribute to the autoimmune response against the PNS.  A greater understanding of how the immune system damages the PNS could lead to better treatments for autoimmune disorders such as GBS.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Guillain-Barre Syndrome


Definition
Definition
Treatment
Treatment
Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Organizations
Publications
Publications

Fact sheet on neurological diagnosis and testing, prepared by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).    

Miller Fisher syndrome information sheet compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) fact sheet produced by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).