Frontotemporal-Dementia-Information-Page

Frontotemporal Dementia Information Page


What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research on FTD. Among several research projects, scientists hope to identify novel genes involved with FTD, perhaps leading to therapeutic approaches where delivery of normal genes would improve or restore brain function.  Clinical imaging may help researchers better understand changes in the brains of people with FTD, as well as help diagnose these disorders.  Other projects are aimed a better understanding the toxic effects of protein buildup and how it is related to the development of FTD and related dementias.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
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What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research on FTD. Among several research projects, scientists hope to identify novel genes involved with FTD, perhaps leading to therapeutic approaches where delivery of normal genes would improve or restore brain function.  Clinical imaging may help researchers better understand changes in the brains of people with FTD, as well as help diagnose these disorders.  Other projects are aimed a better understanding the toxic effects of protein buildup and how it is related to the development of FTD and related dementias.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Pick Disease

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and fund research on FTD. Among several research projects, scientists hope to identify novel genes involved with FTD, perhaps leading to therapeutic approaches where delivery of normal genes would improve or restore brain function.  Clinical imaging may help researchers better understand changes in the brains of people with FTD, as well as help diagnose these disorders.  Other projects are aimed a better understanding the toxic effects of protein buildup and how it is related to the development of FTD and related dementias.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Pick Disease


Definition
Definition
Treatment
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National Institutes of Health, DHHS
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Bethesda, MD 20892-2292
Tel: 301-496-1752; 800-222-2225; 800-222-4225 (TTY)