Dystonias-Information-Page

Dystonias-Information-Page

Dystonia Information Page

What research is being done?

Investigators believe that the dystonias result from an abnormality in an area of the brain called the basal ganglia or other brain regions that control movement. There may be abnormalities in the brain's ability to process certain chemicals or in the way the brain processes information and generates commands to move.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research related to dystonia in its laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and also supports additional dystonia research through grants to major research institutions across the country. Scientists at other NIH Institutes (National institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals with dystonia.  

Scientists at NINDS laboratories and clinics have conducted detailed investigations of the pattern of muscle activity, imaging studies of brain activity, and physiological studies of the brain in people with dystonia. The search for genes responsible for some forms of dystonic continues. Treatment studies--using medications or surgery--are being conducted in many centers. 

The Dystonia Coalition is a clincal research network for dystonia created with support from NINDS and the NIH Office of Rare Diseases as part of the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network. For more information on the clinical studies and patient registry established by the Coalition, see https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/dystonia.

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What research is being done?

Investigators believe that the dystonias result from an abnormality in an area of the brain called the basal ganglia or other brain regions that control movement. There may be abnormalities in the brain's ability to process certain chemicals or in the way the brain processes information and generates commands to move.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research related to dystonia in its laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and also supports additional dystonia research through grants to major research institutions across the country. Scientists at other NIH Institutes (National institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals with dystonia.  

Scientists at NINDS laboratories and clinics have conducted detailed investigations of the pattern of muscle activity, imaging studies of brain activity, and physiological studies of the brain in people with dystonia. The search for genes responsible for some forms of dystonic continues. Treatment studies--using medications or surgery--are being conducted in many centers. 

The Dystonia Coalition is a clincal research network for dystonia created with support from NINDS and the NIH Office of Rare Diseases as part of the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network. For more information on the clinical studies and patient registry established by the Coalition, see https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/dystonia.

Investigators believe that the dystonias result from an abnormality in an area of the brain called the basal ganglia or other brain regions that control movement. There may be abnormalities in the brain's ability to process certain chemicals or in the way the brain processes information and generates commands to move.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research related to dystonia in its laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and also supports additional dystonia research through grants to major research institutions across the country. Scientists at other NIH Institutes (National institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals with dystonia.  

Scientists at NINDS laboratories and clinics have conducted detailed investigations of the pattern of muscle activity, imaging studies of brain activity, and physiological studies of the brain in people with dystonia. The search for genes responsible for some forms of dystonic continues. Treatment studies--using medications or surgery--are being conducted in many centers. 

The Dystonia Coalition is a clincal research network for dystonia created with support from NINDS and the NIH Office of Rare Diseases as part of the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network. For more information on the clinical studies and patient registry established by the Coalition, see https://www.rarediseasesnetwork.org/cms/dystonia.


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