Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Disease-Information-Page

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page


What research is being done?

CJD is believed to be caused by an abnormal form of normal cellular proteins called prions. The normal harmless prion protein is found throughout the body but is most abundant in the nervous system. The infectious form of the prion protein changes shape and clumps together, which may lead to the nerve cell loss and other brain damage seen in CJD. Researchers are examining prions associated with CJD and other prion diseases, and trying to discover factors that influence prion infectivity and transmission. Other projects are examining how abnormal prions cross the protective blood-brain barrier and spread through the central nervous system. Findings may identify new therapies to treat prion diseases.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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What research is being done?

CJD is believed to be caused by an abnormal form of normal cellular proteins called prions. The normal harmless prion protein is found throughout the body but is most abundant in the nervous system. The infectious form of the prion protein changes shape and clumps together, which may lead to the nerve cell loss and other brain damage seen in CJD. Researchers are examining prions associated with CJD and other prion diseases, and trying to discover factors that influence prion infectivity and transmission. Other projects are examining how abnormal prions cross the protective blood-brain barrier and spread through the central nervous system. Findings may identify new therapies to treat prion diseases.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

CJD is believed to be caused by an abnormal form of normal cellular proteins called prions. The normal harmless prion protein is found throughout the body but is most abundant in the nervous system. The infectious form of the prion protein changes shape and clumps together, which may lead to the nerve cell loss and other brain damage seen in CJD. Researchers are examining prions associated with CJD and other prion diseases, and trying to discover factors that influence prion infectivity and transmission. Other projects are examining how abnormal prions cross the protective blood-brain barrier and spread through the central nervous system. Findings may identify new therapies to treat prion diseases.

 

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease


Definition
Definition
Treatment
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Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
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