Arteriovenous-Malformation-Information-Page

Arteriovenous Malformation Information Page


What research is being done?

The NINDS has established an Arteriovenous Study Group to learn more about the natural causes of AVMs and to improve surgical treatment of these lesions.   An NINDS study at Columbia University, A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVMs (ARUBA), showed that medical management alone is superior to medical management and interventional therapy (conventional surgery, endovascular procedures, and radiosurgery) for improving the long-term outcome of individuals with unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations.  Data from a recently closed observational phase will show if the disparities continued over the additional five years of follow-up.

Among other NINDS-funded research, scientists are testing a class of drugs called beta-blockers to see if they may lead to the development of new treatments for people with vascular malformations.  Other NINDS-funded investigators hope to develop biomarkers (signs that may indicate risk of a disease) for AVM that may improve risk assessment and aid in the choice of therapy that may provide maximize benefit with minimal risk to the individual.  Additional NINDS-funded research hopes to determine molecular pathways fundamental to the formation of brain AVMs.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Arteriovenous Malformations

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What research is being done?

The NINDS has established an Arteriovenous Study Group to learn more about the natural causes of AVMs and to improve surgical treatment of these lesions.   An NINDS study at Columbia University, A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVMs (ARUBA), showed that medical management alone is superior to medical management and interventional therapy (conventional surgery, endovascular procedures, and radiosurgery) for improving the long-term outcome of individuals with unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations.  Data from a recently closed observational phase will show if the disparities continued over the additional five years of follow-up.

Among other NINDS-funded research, scientists are testing a class of drugs called beta-blockers to see if they may lead to the development of new treatments for people with vascular malformations.  Other NINDS-funded investigators hope to develop biomarkers (signs that may indicate risk of a disease) for AVM that may improve risk assessment and aid in the choice of therapy that may provide maximize benefit with minimal risk to the individual.  Additional NINDS-funded research hopes to determine molecular pathways fundamental to the formation of brain AVMs.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Arteriovenous Malformations

The NINDS has established an Arteriovenous Study Group to learn more about the natural causes of AVMs and to improve surgical treatment of these lesions.   An NINDS study at Columbia University, A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVMs (ARUBA), showed that medical management alone is superior to medical management and interventional therapy (conventional surgery, endovascular procedures, and radiosurgery) for improving the long-term outcome of individuals with unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations.  Data from a recently closed observational phase will show if the disparities continued over the additional five years of follow-up.

Among other NINDS-funded research, scientists are testing a class of drugs called beta-blockers to see if they may lead to the development of new treatments for people with vascular malformations.  Other NINDS-funded investigators hope to develop biomarkers (signs that may indicate risk of a disease) for AVM that may improve risk assessment and aid in the choice of therapy that may provide maximize benefit with minimal risk to the individual.  Additional NINDS-funded research hopes to determine molecular pathways fundamental to the formation of brain AVMs.

Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus
Arteriovenous Malformations


Definition
Definition
Treatment
Treatment
Prognosis
Prognosis
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
Organizations
Organizations
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