Press Releases & News Articles: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Copyright 2015, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/index.htm en Press Release Saturday Sunday http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss “Sixth sense” may be more than just a feeling http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_sixth_sense_09232016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_sixth_sense_09232016.htm With the help of two young patients with a unique neurological disorder, an initial study by scientists at the National Institutes of Health suggests that a gene called PIEZO2 controls specific aspects of human touch and proprioception, a “sixth sense” describing awareness of one’s body in space. Mutations in the gene caused the two to have movement and balance problems and the loss of some forms of touch. Despite their difficulties, they both appeared to cope with these challenges by relying heavily on vision and other senses. Fri, 23 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT New members appointed to National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nands_council_09152016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nands_council_09152016.htm Four distinguished individuals from the neuroscience community have been chosen to serve on the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council, the principal advisory body to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Thu, 15 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT NINDS Names Dr. Clinton B. Wright as Director of the Office of Clinical Research http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_ocr_director_dr-clinton-wright_09152016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_ocr_director_dr-clinton-wright_09152016.htm The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has named vascular neurologist Clinton B. Wright, M.D., M.S., as director of its Office of Clinical Research (OCR) and associate director of the institute. Dr. Wright is expected to join the NINDS in November. NINDS is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Thu, 15 Sep 2016 00:00:00 EDT Stem cell therapy heals injured mouse brain http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_stem_cell_therapy_08222016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_stem_cell_therapy_08222016.htm Scientists and clinicians have long dreamed of helping the injured brain repair itself by creating new neurons, and an innovative NIH-funded study published today in Nature Medicine may bring this goal much closer to reality. A team of researchers has developed a therapeutic technique that dramatically increases the production of nerve cells in mice with stroke-induced brain damage. Mon, 22 Aug 2016 00:00:00 EDT Researchers examine how Parkinson’s disease alters brain activity over time http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_pd_brain_changes_08152016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_pd_brain_changes_08152016.htm Neuroscientists peered into the brains of patients with Parkinson’s disease and two similar conditions to see how their neural responses changed over time. The study, funded by the NIH’s Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program and published today in Neurology, may provide a new tool for testing experimental medications aimed at alleviating symptoms and slowing the rate at which the diseases damage the brain. Mon, 15 Aug 2016 00:00:00 EDT NIH-funded study supports surgery as treatment for myasthenia gravis http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_myasthenia_gravis_08102016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_myasthenia_gravis_08102016.htm In a global study of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease that causes muscle weakness and fatigue, researchers found that surgical removal of an organ called the thymus reduced patients’ weakness, and their need for immunosuppressive drugs. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health. Wed, 10 Aug 2016 00:00:00 EDT Novel genetic mutation may lead to the progressive loss of motor function http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_neuropathy_08032016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_neuropathy_08032016.htm Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues identified the genetic cause and a possible therapeutic target for a rare form of pediatric progressive neuropathy. Neuropathy, damage or disease affecting the peripheral nervous system, can range from rare conditions linked to a patient’s exome to more common causes like diabetes and viral infections. Wed, 03 Aug 2016 00:00:00 EDT New imaging method may predict risk of post-treatment brain bleeding after stroke http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_bleeding_stroke_brain_06172016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_bleeding_stroke_brain_06172016.htm In a study of stroke patients, investigators confirmed through MRI brain scans that there was an association between the extent of disruption to the brain’s protective blood-brain barrier and the severity of bleeding following invasive stroke therapy. The results of the National Institutes of Health-funded study were published in Neurology. Fri, 17 Jun 2016 00:00:00 EDT Standard blood pressure target is sufficient for treating some strokes http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_bp_strokes_06082016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_bp_strokes_06082016.htm An international stroke study found that standard and intensive blood pressure treatments were equally effective in the emergency treatment of acute intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain. Patients whose systolic blood pressure was reduced rapidly in emergency rooms to standard levels used to treat acute stroke (140-179 mm Hg) did as well as patients whose pressure was reduced to intensive levels (110-139 mm Hg). The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, was funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Wed, 08 Jun 2016 00:00:00 EDT Prevention may be essential to reducing racial disparities in stroke http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_ninds_regards_06022016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_ninds_regards_06022016.htm Blacks between the ages of 45 and 54 die of strokes at a rate that is three times greater than their white counterparts, according to the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, which looked at stroke incidence and mortality of nearly 30,000 participants over the age of 45 from an ethnically and demographically diverse sample of the U.S. population. Thu, 02 Jun 2016 00:00:00 EDT NIH-funded study reveals how differences in male and female brains emerge http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_worm_brain_circuits_05162016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_worm_brain_circuits_05162016.htm Nematode worms may not be from Mars or Venus, but they do have sex-specific circuits in their brains that cause the males and females to act differently. According to new research published in Nature, scientists have determined how these sexually dimorphic (occurring in either males or females) connections arise in the worm nervous system. The research was funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Mon, 16 May 2016 00:00:00 EDT New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_new_role_identified_for_scars_04082016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_new_role_identified_for_scars_04082016.htm For decades, it was thought that scar-forming cells called astrocytes were responsible for blocking neuronal regrowth across the level of spinal cord injury, but recent findings challenge this idea. According to a new mouse study, astrocyte scars may actually be required for repair and regrowth following spinal cord injury. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and published in Nature. Fri, 08 Apr 2016 13:00:00 EDT