Press Releases & News Articles: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Copyright 2014, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke en Press Release Saturday Sunday NIH invests $85 million for BRAIN Initiative research$85-million-for-BRAIN-Initiative-Research.htm$85-million-for-BRAIN-Initiative-Research.htm The National Institutes of Health announced its second wave of grants to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, bringing the NIH investment to $85 million in fiscal year 2015. Thu, 01 Oct 2015 00:00:00 EDT Dormant viral genes may awaken to cause ALS Scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) discovered that reactivation of ancient viral genes embedded in the human genome may cause the destruction of neurons in some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Wed, 30 Sep 2015 00:00:00 EDT Scientists uncover nuclear process in the brain that may affect disease Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Mon, 17 Aug 2015 00:00:00 EDT PINK1 protein crucial for removing broken-down energy reactors Cells are powered by tiny energy reactors called mitochondria. When damaged, they leak destructive molecules that can cause substantial harm and eventually kill brain cells. Scientists at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) showed that a protein called PINK1 that is implicated in Parkinson’s disease is critical for helping cells get rid of dysfunctional mitochondria. Wed, 12 Aug 2015 00:00:00 EDT Neurons' broken machinery piles up in ALS A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies. Wed, 12 Aug 2015 00:00:00 EDT Scientists adopt new strategy to find Huntington’s disease therapies Scientists searched the chromosomes of more than 4,000 Huntington’s disease patients and found that DNA repair genes may determine when the neurological symptoms begin. Partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, the results may provide a guide for discovering new treatments for Huntington’s disease and a roadmap for studying other neurological disorders. Fri, 07 Aug 2015 00:00:00 EDT Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell’s exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. NIH scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many drugs. Fri, 31 Jul 2015 00:00:00 EDT Futuristic brain probe allows for wireless control of neurons A study showed that scientists can wirelessly control the path a mouse walks with just a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. Thu, 16 Jul 2015 00:00:00 EDT Normal neuronal firing may spark brain tumor growth Using human brain tumor samples, scientists have discovered that normal patterns of nerve cell firing may enhance the growth of cancer cells. They also found that, neuroligin-3 (NLGN3), a gene known to be important for brain cell communication, may influence tumor growth and patient survival, making it a potential new target for therapy. The study, published in Cell, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Tue, 16 Jun 2015 00:00:00 EDT Progesterone does not significantly improve outcome after traumatic brain injury Results of a phase 3 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial suggest that progesterone may not significantly improve outcomes in patients who have suffered a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Tue, 16 Jun 2015 00:00:00 EDT NIH Names Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D. Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. announced today the selection of Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., as the Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). He has served as Acting Director of the NINDS since October, 2014. Thu, 11 Jun 2015 00:00:00 EDT Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. Fri, 22 May 2015 00:00:00 EDT