Press Releases & News Articles: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Copyright 2015, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/index.htm en Press Release Saturday Sunday http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss New members selected for National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nands_council_02042016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nands_council_02042016.htm Six esteemed individuals have been selected to serve on the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council, the principal advisory body to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Thu, 04 Feb 2016 00:00:00 EST NIH Launches New Public Health Campaign http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_mindyourrisks_02022016.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_mindyourrisks_02022016.htm A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that uncontrolled high blood pressure is not only the leading cause of stroke but may also be linked to cognitive decline and dementia. Today, the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is launching a public health education campaign called Mind Your Risks. Tue, 02 Feb 2016 00:00:00 EST New NIH-funded memory drug moves into Phase 1 clinical study http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_memory_drug_12312015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_memory_drug_12312015.htm An experimental drug that may improve memory is now being tested in a Phase 1 safety trial. The compound, BPN14770, was developed by Tetra Discovery Partners, with support from the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network, a program designed to facilitate the discovery and development of novel neurological treatments. It is the first compound funded by the program to reach a Phase 1 clinical trial. Thu, 31 Dec 2015 00:00:00 EST Speeding up brain’s waste disposal may slow down neurodegenerative diseases http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_proteasomes_neurodegenerative_disorders_12212015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_proteasomes_neurodegenerative_disorders_12212015.htm A study of mice shows how proteasomes, a cell’s waste disposal system, may break down during Alzheimer’s disease (AD), creating a cycle in which increased levels of damaged proteins become toxic, clog proteasomes, and kill neurons. The study, published in Nature Medicine and supported by the National Institutes of Health, suggests that enhancing proteasome activity with drugs during the early stages of AD may prevent dementia and reduce damage to the brain. Mon, 21 Dec 2015 00:00:00 EST Scientists manipulate consciousness in rats http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brain_consciousness_12182015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brain_consciousness_12182015.htm Scientists showed that they could alter brain activity of rats and either wake them up or put them in an unconscious state by changing the firing rates of neurons in the central thalamus, a region known to regulate arousal. The study, published in eLIFE, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health. Fri, 18 Dec 2015 00:00:00 EST DNA repair factor linked to breast cancer may also play a role in Alzheimer’s disease http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brca1_alzheimers_11302015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brca1_alzheimers_11302015.htm Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The results, published in Nature Communications, suggest that low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain may contribute to dementia. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Mon, 30 Nov 2015 00:00:00 EST Study shows how fruit flies beat the heat (and cold) http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_flies_temp_11232015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_flies_temp_11232015.htm Humans aren’t the only ones that take shelter when the weather turns unpleasant. A team of researchers at Northwestern University’s Department of Neurobiology has mapped the neural circuits that allow flies to avoid uncomfortable temperatures. Mon, 23 Nov 2015 00:00:00 EST Batten disease may benefit from gene therapy http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_batten_gene_therapy_11112015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_batten_gene_therapy_11112015.htm In a study of dogs, scientists showed that a new way to deliver replacement genes may be effective at slowing the development of childhood Batten disease, a rare and fatal neurological disorder. Wed, 11 Nov 2015 00:00:00 EST Scientists identify main component of brain repair after stroke http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_GDF10_stroke_repair_10282015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_GDF10_stroke_repair_10282015.htm Looking at brain tissue from mice, monkeys and humans, scientists have found that a molecule known as growth and differentiation factor 10 (GDF10) is a key player in repair mechanisms following stroke. The findings suggest that GDF10 may be a potential therapy for recovery after stroke. The study, published in Nature Neuroscience, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Wed, 28 Oct 2015 00:00:00 EDT An itch you just can’t scratch http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_chronic_itch_10272015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_chronic_itch_10272015.htm Everyone knows the best way to suppress an itch is to scratch it, but for people who suffer from skin diseases like eczema, no amount of scratching can bring relief. Fortunately, help may be on the way. Scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and the University of California, Berkeley have identified a pair of proteins responsible for chronic itching. The study, published in Neuron and partially funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), may lead to treatments that can stop an itch at its source. Tue, 27 Oct 2015 00:00:00 EDT Study in mice shows how brain ignores distractions http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brain_ignores_distractions_10212015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_brain_ignores_distractions_10212015.htm In a study of mice, scientists discovered that a brain region called the thalamus may be critical for filtering out distractions. The study, published in Nature and partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, paves the way to understanding how defects in the thalamus might underlie symptoms seen in patients with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and schizophrenia. Wed, 21 Oct 2015 00:00:00 EDT Nuclear transport problems linked to ALS and FTD http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nuclear_transport_10162015.htm http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/pressrelease_nuclear_transport_10162015.htm Three teams of scientists supported by the National Institutes of Health showed that a genetic mutation linked to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) may destroy neurons by disrupting the movement of materials in and out of the cell’s nucleus, or command center where most of its DNA is stored. Fri, 16 Oct 2015 00:00:00 EDT