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NINDS News Articles


   


 

Sparking Brain Tumors

Normal neuronal firing may spark brain tumor growth
Tuesday, Jun 16, 2015
Using human brain tumor samples, scientists have discovered that normal patterns of nerve cell firing may enhance the growth of cancer cells. They also found that, neuroligin-3 (NLGN3), a gene known to be important for brain cell communication, may influence tumor growth and patient survival, making it a potential new target for therapy. The study, published in Cell, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Progesterone does not significantly improve outcome after traumatic brain injury
Tuesday, Jun 16, 2015
Results of a phase 3 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial suggest that progesterone may not significantly improve outcomes in patients who have suffered a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

NINDS Director Walter J. Korozhetz

NIH Names Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D. Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Thursday, Jun 11, 2015
National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. announced today the selection of Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., as the Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). He has served as Acting Director of the NINDS since October, 2014.

Microscope image of ALS and FTD in a mouse

Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD
Friday, May 22, 2015
Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72.

MRI machine

A SMARTer approach to stroke care
Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Time is critical when it comes to stroke: early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers.


New NIH logo

Researchers find essential brain circuit in visual development
Monday Aug 26, 2013
A study in mice reveals an elegant circuit within the developing visual system that helps dictate how the eyes connect to the brain. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, has implications for treating amblyopia, a vision disorder that occurs when the brain ignores one eye in favor of the other.

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