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NINDS News Articles


   


 

Microscope image of ALS and FTD in a mouse

Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD
Friday, May 22, 2015
Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72.

MRI machine

A SMARTer approach to stroke care
Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Time is critical when it comes to stroke: early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers.

Cellular code writer

Scientists unravel the mystery of the tubulin code
Tuesday, May 12, 2015
Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs— speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. The pattern of these markers makes up the “tubulin code” and according to a paper published in Cell, scientists at NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have uncovered the mechanism behind one of the main writers of this code, tubulin tyrosine ligase-7 (TTLL7).

Searching for brain cancer treatments

Study points to possible treatment for lethal pediatric brain cancer
Monday, May 4, 2015
Using brain tumor samples collected from children in the United States and Europe, an international team of scientists found that the drug panobinostat and similar gene regulating drugs may be effective at treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), an aggressive and lethal form of pediatric cancer.

An artist’s representation of the remyelination study.

Drugs that activate brain stem cells may reverse multiple sclerosis in mice
Monday, Apr 20, 2015
Two drugs already on the market — an antifungal and a steroid — may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study in Nature, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. The study was partially funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).


New NIH logo

Researchers find essential brain circuit in visual development
Monday Aug 26, 2013
A study in mice reveals an elegant circuit within the developing visual system that helps dictate how the eyes connect to the brain. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, has implications for treating amblyopia, a vision disorder that occurs when the brain ignores one eye in favor of the other.

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