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NINDS News Articles


   


 

Brain goes nuclear

Scientists uncover nuclear process in the brain that may affect disease
Monday, Aug 17, 2015
Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Cellular energy factories

PINK1 protein crucial for removing broken-down energy reactors
Wednesday, Aug 12, 2015
Cells are powered by tiny energy reactors called mitochondria. When damaged, they leak destructive molecules that can cause substantial harm and eventually kill brain cells. Scientists at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) showed that a protein called PINK1 that is implicated in Parkinson’s disease is critical for helping cells get rid of dysfunctional mitochondria.

Making scents of new cells in the brain’s odor-processing area

Neurons' broken machinery piles up in ALS
Wednesday, Aug 12, 2015
A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies.

HD_skyline_view

Scientists adopt new strategy to find Huntington’s disease therapies
Friday, Aug 7, 2015
Scientists searched the chromosomes of more than 4,000 Huntington’s disease patients and found that DNA repair genes may determine when the neurological symptoms begin. Partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, the results may provide a guide for discovering new treatments for Huntington’s disease and a roadmap for studying other neurological disorders.

Crystal clear hormone receptors

Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors
Friday, Jul 31, 2015
Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell’s exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. NIH scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many drugs.


New NIH logo

Researchers find essential brain circuit in visual development
Monday Aug 26, 2013
A study in mice reveals an elegant circuit within the developing visual system that helps dictate how the eyes connect to the brain. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, has implications for treating amblyopia, a vision disorder that occurs when the brain ignores one eye in favor of the other.

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