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NINDS Grantees in the News


See news releases about NINDS-supported research from across the U.S. 

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

2015


Epigenomics of Alzheimer’s disease progression
February 18 | MIT
Study of epigenomic modifications reveals immune basis of Alzheimer's disease.

Brain’s iconic seat of speech goes silent when we actually talk
February 18 | University of California, Berkeley & Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
For 150 years, the iconic Broca’s area of the brain has been recognized as the command center for human speech, including vocalization. Now, scientists at UC Berkeley and Johns Hopkins University in Maryland are challenging this long-held assumption with new evidence that Broca’s area actually switches off when we talk out loud.

What Autism Can Teach Us About Brain Cancer
February 9 | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Applying lessons learned from autism to brain cancer, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered why elevated levels of the protein NHE9 add to the lethality of the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, glioblastoma.

UVA finds trigger for protective immune response to spinal cord injury
February 6 | University of Virginia
Hot on the heels of discovering a protective form of immune response to spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have pinpointed the biological trigger for that response – a vital step toward being able to harness the body’s defenses to improve treatment for spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

Anti-epilepsy drug preserves brain function after stroke
February 4 | UT Health Science Center San Antonio
New approach stops nerve activity instead of breaking up clots.

Study ties immune cells to delayed onset of post-stroke dementia
February 3 | Standford University
Researchers say that the appearance in the brain of a type of immune cell has been implicated in delayed dementia in mice and humans who have suffered a stroke.

New reset button discovered for circadian clock
February 3 | Vanderbilt University
The discovery of a new reset button for the brain's master biological clock could eventually lead to new treatments for conditions like seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift and possibly even cure jet lag.

Neurologists find movement tracking device helps assess severity of Parkinson’s
February 3 | University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
A device that measures movement and balance can effectively help assess and track the progression of Parkinson’s disease, even when medications are used to reduce Parkinson’s symptoms, UT Southwestern Medical Center research found.

Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury
February 2 | University of Wisconsin-Madison
This story starts in 1955, upon the death of Albert Einstein, when the pathologist charged with performing the famous scientist’s autopsy stole his brain.

Glioblastoma: Three Genes Tied to Radiation Resistance in Recurrent Tumors
January 30 | The Ohio State University
A new study has identified several genes that together enable a lethal form of brain cancer to recur and progress after radiation therapy.

Walking on ice takes more than brains
January 29 | Salk Institute
Walking across an icy parking lot in winter–and remaining upright–takes intense concentration. But a new discovery suggests that much of the balancing act that our bodies perform when faced with such a task happens unconsciously, thanks to a cluster of neurons in our spinal cord that function as a “mini-brain” to integrate sensory information and make the necessary adjustments to our muscles so that we don’t slip and fall.

Brain’s On-Off Thirst Switch Identified
January 26 | Columbia University Medical Center
Neurons that trigger our sense of thirst—and neurons that turn it off—have been identified by Columbia University Medical Center neuroscientists. The paper was published today in the online edition of Nature.

Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development
January 23 | Washington University in St. Louis
Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

Scientists find gene vital to central nervous system development
January 21 | Washington University in St. Louis
Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

Muscle weakness studies suggest possible therapeutic strategies
January 20 | University of Colorado Denver
A recently published study by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and her colleagues suggests potential therapies for central core disease, a condition that can delay development of motor skills such as sitting, crawling and walking in affected infants.

New high-speed 3-D microscope -- SCAPE -- gives deeper view of living things
January 19 | Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science
Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), has developed a new microscope that can image living things in 3D at very high speeds.

What Really Causes Brain Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury in Football and Elsewhere? University of Maryland School of Medicine Researchers Have a Surprising Answer
January 15 | University of Maryland
New Study Finds That Brain Inflammation Is a Major Treatable Cause.

Blood Test for Brain Injury May Not Be Feasible
January 13 | University of Rochester
Complications involving the brain’s unique waste removal system – the existence of which has only recently been brought to light – may thwart efforts to identify biomarkers that detect traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Breakthrough on chronic pain: New imaging study paves way for potential new treatments
January 12 | Harvard Gazette
For the first time, scientists have found evidence of neuroinflammation in key regions of the brains of patients with chronic pain, according to a new study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a Harvard affiliate.

Brain Scientists Figure Out How A Protein Crucial To Learning And Memory Works
January 7 | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical “clamp” that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger.

Study Pinpoints Autism-Linked Protein for Sculpting Brain Connections
January 6 | Duke University
A new study by Duke researchers provides a close-up of synapse refinement and identifies a protein that is crucial in this process. Disruptions in the protein, called hevin, have previously been linked to autism, depression and suicide, but the molecule’s role in the developing brain was mostly unknown until now.

Animal Study Points to a Treatment for Huntington's Disease -- CHOP Gene Therapy Expert Fine-Tunes Protein Signals, Improves Motor Function and Reduces Brain Shrinkage in a Neurological Disorder
January 5 | The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
By adjusting the levels of a key signaling protein, researchers improved motor function and brain abnormalities in experimental animals with a form of Huntington’s disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. The new findings may lay the groundwork of a novel treatment for people with this fatal, progressive disease.

Last updated February 23, 2015