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Funding News - July 2011


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
News & Notes:

Funding Opportunities:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



NINDS Announces a New SMA Funding Opportunity

NINDS is requesting applications to study biomarkers in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

SMA is a disease caused by an abnormal or missing gene known as the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1), which is responsible for the production of a protein essential to motor neurons.  Although the disease can be readily diagnosed, there are no approved treatments for SMA.  Biomarkers are objective ways to measure a disease process.  They also may provide a means to track progression of the disease and to determine if new treatments are effective.  This announcement encourages the study of candidate biomarkers in SMA that may be useful for evaluating new treatments.

This SMA biomarkers study will be the first project planned by the new Neurology Network of Excellence Clinical Trials (NeuroNEXT).  NeuroNEXT is a major NINDS initiative designed to streamline the early phase testing of new therapies in patients with neurological disorders.  Biomarkers, which provide information on whether new therapies are having the desired effect in patients, are a critical component in early phase testing.

Letters of intent are due August 1, 2011; applications are due September 1, 2011.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Elizabeth McNeil, program director, Office of Clinical Research, NINDS, at 301-496-9135 or mcneilde@ninds.nih.gov; or visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/rfa-files/RFA-NS-12-004.html.

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NINDS Hosts Nonprofit Forum to Advance Therapeutics

NINDS recently hosted its fifth nonprofit forum:  “Partnering to Advance Therapeutics for Neurological Disorders.” The meeting—attended by representatives from 60 nonprofit organizations across the country—gave patient advocacy groups an opportunity to learn from each other and about NIH and NINDS, provided them with an environment to share their interests, and allowed them to interact directly with program staff.  The forum was held on June 1 at the Neuroscience Center Building in Bethesda, MD.

NINDS Director Dr. Story Landis opened with welcome remarks and an overview, “NIH 101:  What It Is and Isn’t and How Council Works,” which covered NIH’s mission and makeup, and NINDS funding basics.

“Basic scientists think NIH is about enabling them to discover exciting new facts about how the brain works and how the heart works, and people interested in diseases think NIH is about learning about how to treat diseases,” said Landis.  “But it’s the marriage of that basic science and the application of that basic science that makes NIH unique.”

Participants discussed the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)—the proposed new NIH institute scheduled to open later this year—and then split into parallel breakout sessions, led by panels of NINDS program staff as well as nonprofit representatives.  Topics dealt with peer review and priority setting, translational and preclinical science, resources for patient registries and recruitment, and clinical research. 

The interactive breakout sessions were new to the forum this year, as was the new off-campus location.  These changes were suggestions by a planning group of advisors invited to help NINDS maximize the benefits of the meeting for the groups.  Members of the planning group were NINDS Director Dr. Story Landis; NINDS Deputy Director Dr. Walter Koroshetz; Ronald Bartek, president of the Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA); Mary Cobb, senior vice president of Membership and Organizational Strategy of the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD); Marian Emr, director of the NINDS Office of Communications and Public Liaison; Petra Kaufmann, associate director for Clinical Research, NINDS; Natacha Pires, director of medical and public affairs for the Neuropathy Association; Amy Rick, chief executive officer of the Parkinson’s Action Network; NINDS Public Liaison Officer Gregory Roa; Dr. Cynthia Rothblum-Oviatt, science coordinator of the Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T) Children’s Project; and Dr. Vicky Whittemore, former vice president and chief scientific officer of the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance.

During lunch, smaller networking groups were divided among six broad topics:  Rare Disease Network, Multisystem Diseases, the Benefits of Building Nonprofit Alliances, Nuts and Bolts of Establishing a Nonprofit Agency/Selecting a Scientific Advisory Board, Public-Private Partnerships, and Working with FDA.  Representatives could talk directly with the NINDS program staff who oversee the institute’s research portfolios as well as with their fellow patient advocacy colleagues and NIH and FDA staff. 

“We all came together to learn and discuss how we could work collaboratively to create a better future for the patients we represent,” said Natacha Pires, director of Medical and Public Affairs of the Neuropathy Association.  “For some, this was an opportunity to touch base and communicate updates; for others it was the exciting first of many more conversations to come,” she said.

The afternoon was filled with case histories, highlighting the accomplishments and experiences of three groups, and showing how collaboration and coordination with NIH, other HHS agencies, industry, and Congress could lead to successful outcomes. 

At the end of the day the nonprofit representatives gathered independent of NINDS staff to talk with each other and brainstorm about working together.  This session was also a first this year.

“The NINDS Nonprofit Forum is a recognition and acceptance of the evolving role of patient advocacy groups as research partners in the quest for better diagnostics and interventions for rare diseases,” said Dr. Stephen Groft, director of the NIH Office of Rare Disease Research.  “It was an outstanding conference.  The interchange that occurs between staff and patient group leaders really is remarkable.”

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Autism Centers of Excellence

NINDS requests new and renewal applications for Autism Centers of Excellence:  Networks and Centers.  This announcement is made together with 4 other NIH components and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms:  R01 and P50.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental disorders with early childhood onset.  These disorders, for which there is no cure and only limited treatments, generally have lifelong effects.  The purpose of this announcement is to encourage research on ASD, and encourages the development of networks and centers.  A network consists of multiple sites focusing on a specific topic.  Centers bring together expertise, infrastructure and resources focused on major questions about autism.  Centers should involve collaborations of basic and clinical scientists to address the research questions posed.

Letters of Intent Due October 16, 2011

Applications Due November 16, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, program director, Office of Clinical Research, NINDS, at 301-496-5821 or hirtzd@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-12-195.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-12-196.html.

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Blueprint: Developing Novel Drugs for Disorders of the Nervous System

NINDS requests applications for developing novel drugs for disorders of the nervous system.  This announcement is affiliated with the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research.

The NIH Blueprint is a framework to enhance cooperative activities among 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices that support research on the nervous system.

Recent advances in neuroscience offer unprecedented opportunities to discover new treatments for nervous system disorders. However, most promising compounds identified through basic research are not sufficiently drug-like for human testing.  To enable drug development by the neuroscience community, the NIH Blueprint is establishing a ‘virtual pharma’ network of contract service providers and consultants with extensive industry experience.  This program intends to develop drugs from medicinal chemistry optimization through Phase I clinical testing and to facilitate industry partnerships for subsequent development of the drugs.

Letters of Intent Due November 15, 2011

Applications Due December 15, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Jill Heemskerk, program director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-1779 or jill.heemskerk@nih.gov; or Dr. Rebecca Farkas, program director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-9271 or farkasr@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-12-002.html.

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Clinical Trial Planning Grants in Type 1 Diabetes

NINDS requests applications for clinical trial planning grants for type 1 diabetes.  This announcement is made together with 3 other NIH components.

Type 1 diabetes is a serious chronic illness. New types of insulin, along with improved management and monitoring technologies, have the potential to improve outcomes.  However, diabetes management requires complex balancing of medication dosing, diet, and exercise.  This announcement supports the development of clinical trials in individuals with type 1 diabetes to improve glycemic control and/or to treat or reduce diabetes complications including peripheral neuropathy and stroke.

Letters of Intent Due February 16, 2012

Applications Due March 15, 2012

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Katrina Gwinn, program director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, at 301-496-5745 or gwinnk@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-11-010.html.

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CounterACT

NINDS invites applications for countermeasures against chemical threats (CounterACT) cooperative research projects.  This announcement is made together with 6 other NIH components.

Chemical threats are toxic chemicals that could be used in a terrorist attack or accidentally released from industrial production, storage, or shipping.  They include traditional chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin and VX, and toxic industrial chemicals and pesticides such as cyanide, chlorine, parathion, and sodium fluoroacetate.  The mission of the CounterACT program is to develop new and improved therapeutics for chemical threats.

Letters of Intent Due August 14, 2011

Applications Due September 14, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. David Jett, program director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-6035 or dj140o@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-11-155.html.

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Ethical Issues

NINDS encourages applications for research on ethical issues in biomedical, social, and behavioral research.  This announcement is made together with 16 other NIH components and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms:  R01 and R21.

Research is needed to anticipate the evolution of bioethical issues, to ensure NIH-supported research is conducted in the most ethical manner possible, and to inform policy discussions that may emerge from NIH-supported research.  This announcement seeks applications for research projects to analyze and address ethical challenges and issues related to the conduct and output of biomedical, clinical, social, and behavioral research within the NIH mission.

Potential applicants should contact Joanne Odenkirchen, clinical research program manager, Office of Clinical Research, NINDS, at 301-496-3104 or jo21x@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-180.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-182.html.

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HIV-Associated Neurodegeneration

NINDS, NIMH, and NIA request applications for research on the pathophysiology of HIV-associated neurodegeneration in aging populations on long-term anti-retroviral therapy.  This announcement is supported by 2 funding mechanisms:  R01 and R21.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projects that by 2015, more than half of all HIV-infected individuals in the U.S. will be over age 50.  Coupled with the aging process, the extended exposure of these adults to both HIV and antiretroviral drugs appears to increase their risk of illness and death from cardiovascular, bone, kidney, liver, lung, neurological, and neuropsychiatric complications.  This announcement will stimulate research on the pathophysiology and treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in HIV-infected people over age 50 who are on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Letters of Intent Due August 9, 2011

Applications Due September 9, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. May Wong, program director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, at 301-496-1431 or wongm@mail.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-12-070.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-12-071.html.

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Hypertension

NINDS and NHLBI request applications for research on reducing the impact of hypertension in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Hypertension is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease and stroke.  This announcement seeks research projects that emphasize implementation science and focus on hypertension control and prevention in LMICs.  Poor control of hypertension and a lack of strategies to maintain normal blood pressure, particularly in LMICs, reflect the challenges of effective and affordable implementation in health care and other systems.  The goal of this initiative is to improve implementation of existing approaches to prevention and control rather than develop new treatments.  Developing novel and effective means of controlling blood pressure in persons who have suffered stroke or transient ischemic attack is of particular interest to NINDS.

Applications Due August 10, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Salina Waddy, program director, Office of Minority Health and Research, NINDS, at 301-496-3102 or waddysp@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-12-027.html.

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Independent Scientist Award

NINDS encourages applications for the Independent Scientist Award.  This announcement is made together with 11 other NIH components.

The award supports the development of outstanding scientists and enables them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their research fields.  It provides 3, 4, or 5 years of salary support and “protected” time for newly independent scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-191.html.

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Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award

NINDS invites applications for the Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award. This announcement is made together with 18 other NIH components.

The award prepares qualified individuals for careers that have a significant impact on the health-related needs of the Nation.  It provides support and “protected” time for an intensive, mentored research career development experience in biomedical or behavioral research, including translational research leading to research independence.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-193.html.

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Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award

NINDS encourages applications for the Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award. This announcement is made together with 19 other NIH components.

The objectives of this award are to: encourage research-oriented clinicians to develop independent research skills and gain experience in advanced methods and experimental approaches needed to become independent investigators; increase the pool of clinical researchers who can conduct patient-oriented studies; and support the career development of investigators who have made a commitment to focus on patient-oriented research.  It provides salary and research support for a sustained period of “protected time” (3 to 5 years).

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-194.html.

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Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award

NINDS invites applications for Mentored Quantitative Research Development Awards. This announcement is made together with 16 other NIH components.

The purpose of this award is to attract to NIH-relevant research investigators whose quantitative science and engineering research has thus far not been focused primarily on questions of health and disease. The award provides support and “protected” time for a period of supervised study and research for productive professionals with quantitative and engineering backgrounds to integrate their expertise with NIH research. Quantitative includes mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, and chemistry.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-196.html.

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Mentored Research Scientist Development Award

NINDS encourages applications for Mentored Research Scientist Development Awards. This announcement is made together with 15 other NIH components.

The award provides support and “protected” time—3, 4, or 5 years—for intensive, supervised career development under the guidance of an experienced mentor or sponsor in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences leading to research independence.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Michelle Jones-London, program director, Office of Minority Health and Research, NINDS, at 301-496-3102 or jonesmiche@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-190.html.

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Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research

NINDS invites applications for Midcareer Investigator Awards in patient-oriented research.  This announcement is made together with 15 other NIH components.

This award provides mid-career investigators with “protected” time to lead research mentoring programs for neurology residents and fellows, and to conduct their NIH-funded research.  The overall goal is to increase workforce diversity in the pool of clinical researchers who can conduct patient-oriented research, successfully compete for peer-reviewed grants, and mentor the next generation of clinical investigators.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-195.html.

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Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

NINDS encourages applications that apply nanoscience and nanotechnology approaches to address problems in biology and medicine.  This announcement is made together with 16 other NIH components and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms:  R01 and R21.

Nanoscience and nanotechnology refer to the understanding and control of matter at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels—at the length scale of approximately 1 - 100 nanometers.  This announcement encourages the study of basic biological phenomena and engineer nanotechnology solutions that will enable biomedical breakthroughs in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of diseases and traumatic injuries.  Projects may include the development, modification, or integration of advanced nanotechnologies and nanoscience-based tools, methods, concepts, and devices; and engineering nanoscale structures and systems to study and understand biological processes in health and disease, and to develop novel diagnostics and interventions for treating disease.

Potential applicants should contact Stephanie Fertig, research project manager, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-1779 or sf260n@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-148.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-149.html.

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National Service Award - Institutional Research Training Grants

NINDS invites applications for the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Institutional Research Training Grants program.  This announcement is made together with 20 other NIH components. 

The program develops and/or enhances research training opportunities for individuals interested in careers in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research.  It also may be used to support other types of predoctoral and/or postdoctoral training in scientific areas relevant to the NIH mission.  The overall goal is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available in appropriate scientific disciplines to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-184.html.

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Neural Prosthetics

NINDS, NIBIB, and NICHD encourage applications for advanced neural prosthetics research and development. 

Neural prosthetic devices restore or supplement function of the nervous system lost during disease or injury.  Recent efforts in brain machine/computer interfaces include real time cortical control of robotic limbs in non-human primates and the control of computer cursors by paralyzed individuals.  There are opportunities to capitalize on advances in fundamental understanding of natural neuromuscular systems and in neural interfaces to develop new prosthetic limbs.  This announcement encourages applications for cooperative agreements to pursue translational and pilot clinical studies for neural prosthetics.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Naomi Kleitman, program director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, at 301-496-1447 or nk85q@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-147.html.

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NIH Pathway to Independence Award

NINDS encourages applications for the NIH Pathway to Independence Award.  This announcement is made together with 22 other NIH components.

One of the most challenging transitions in any research career is that from a postdoctoral trainee to an independent scientist.  This award assists postdoctoral investigators in transitioning to a stable independent research position with NIH or other independent research funding.  It not only allows investigators to transition at an earlier age, but also provides an enhanced probability of success in obtaining NIH or other independent research support.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, director, Training and Career Development, NINDS, at 301-496-4188 or korns@ninds.nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-197.html.

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NINDS Cooperative Program in Translational Research Single-Component Research Projects

NINDS encourages applications for NINDS Cooperative Program in Translational Research single-component research projects.

Recent discoveries across a broad range of neuroscience research areas offer promising opportunities for treatment of neurological disorders.  As part of its mission to reduce the burden of neurological disease, NINDS encourages the "translation" of these discoveries into new treatments.  This announcement supports milestone-driven projects focused on the identification, optimization, and pre-clinical testing of candidate therapeutics.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, program director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-1779 or tm208y@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-11-153.html.

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NINDS Phase III Investigator-Initiated Multi-Site Clinical Trials

NINDS invites applications for phase III investigator-initiated multi-site clinical trials.

Phase III clinical trials are the most complex and challenging trials to design and implement.  For completion within the funding period and budget, awarded clinical trials need extensive planning and proactive oversight.  In addition to lengthy study start-up, slow participant enrollment can cause trial delays and result in the need of additional funding in order to complete the planned trial.  This announcement provides a mechanism suitable for the submission and successful implementation of a large, complex phase III clinical trial, incorporating several stages to allow the investigators and NINDS to assess study progress and feasibility.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Scott Janis, clinical research project manager, Office of Clinical Research, NINDS, at 301-496-9135 or sj151t@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-11-173.html.

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NINDS Program Project Grant

NINDS invites applications for program project grants (PPG).

PPGs support investigator-initiated research programs, consisting of three or more highly interdependent projects, in which a team of investigators works in a clearly defined area of mutual scientific interest.  PPGs support research in which the funding of several interdependent highly meritorious projects as a group offers significant scientific advantages over support of these same projects as individual research grants.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Alan Willard, deputy associate director, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS, at 301-496-9248 or aw135y@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-11-172.html.

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Proteomics and Glycomics

NINDS invites small business applications to develop new technology for proteomics and glycomics.  This announcement is made together with 4 other NIH components and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms:  R43/R44 and R41/R42.

Proteomics continues to be a rapidly expanding field.  Proteomics technologies and methods in the three broad, interacting domains of biology, analytical chemistry, and informatics are still largely inadequate to address the bulk of challenging biological problems.  This announcement encourages small businesses to develop broadly applicable research tools that address the core technical challenges in proteomics and glycomics, including—but not restricted to—robotics, sample preparation and pre-fractionation, analytical separations, gel and array imaging, quantitation, mass spectrometry, intelligent automated data acquisition, and improved informatics technologies.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Danilo Tagle, program director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, at 301-496-5745 or dt39y@nih.gov.  For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-215.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-214.html.

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Persons with Advanced Cancer Pain Sought for Study

NINDS is seeking persons with severe pain from advanced cancer to participate in a research study. This study is investigating the safety and effectiveness of the experimental medication resiniferatoxin (RTX), which is being injected directly into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of humans for the first time. 

This study involves up to 8 visits to the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. There will be one inpatient admission lasting 2-3 days to receive a single dose of the study drug, which is given under general anesthesia. Study evaluations include a history and physical examination, eye examination, sensory testing, blood draws, pregnancy test, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electrocardiogram (EKG), and completion of pain questionnaires. Telephone follow up will continue for 7 months after the treatment.

Volunteers must be 18 years of age or older, have cancer, and have severe pain below the chest that has not improved with standard treatment. They must also agree to live with a responsible adult and not seek any new cancer treatment for 15 days after receiving the study drug.  Those who are pregnant or have impaired blood clotting, CSF shunts, implanted metal objects, or allergy to chili peppers or capsaicin are not eligible to participate.

This study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center.  There is no cost for participation, for the study medication, or for any of the tests associated with the research study.  Travel costs may be reimbursed.

For more information, contact Lisa Farinelli, RN, at 301-594-8118.  Please refer to study number 09-D-0039.

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Persons with Epilepsy Sought for Study

NINDS is seeking individuals with seizures that are not controlled by medication for a research study to better understand uncontrolled seizures and to train neurologists and neurosurgeons in the management of uncontrolled epilepsy.  Standard epilepsy treatment, including epilepsy surgery if needed, is provided to participants.

Volunteers must be 8 years of age or older, and will be evaluated with standard epilepsy testing, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head, blood tests, video electroencephalography, and neurological examinations.  This study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.  Participants will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for about 2 weeks for testing and possible surgery and recovery, and will return for outpatient visits 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery.  If surgery is not performed, no further follow-up will be required after the initial 2-week hospital stay. There is no charge for study-related tests and procedures; some travel costs may be reimbursed. 

For more information, contact the Patient Recruitment Office at 800-411-1222 or prpl@cc.nih.gov, or Gretchen Scott, RN, at 301-496-2921. Please refer to study number 11-N-0051.

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Persons with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Sought for Study

NINDS scientists are seeking persons with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) to participate in a research study to learn about NF2 tumor development and progression.

Study participants will have an evaluation of their NF2-related tumors and how those tumors affect vision, walking, hearing, and balance. All testing—which will include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)—will be performed on an outpatient basis and will be repeated every 6 months for up to 5 years.

Eligible persons must have a diagnosis of NF2 by established criteria or genetic testing, be 8 to 75 years old, and be able to have MRI scans.  Persons who are pregnant, or who have an allergy to MRI contrast may not be eligible.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.  There is no charge for study-related tests.  Travel costs may be reimbursed.

For more information, contact the Patient Recruitment Office at 800-411-1222 or prpl@cc.nih.gov.  Please refer to study number 08-N-0044.

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Persons with Syringomyelia Sought for Study

NINDS is seeking persons with syringomyelia to participate in a research study. This study will follow the natural course of and effects of surgery for syringomyelia.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and have syringomyelia or Chiari I malformation.  Persons who cannot undergo MRI scanning, have bleeding problems, or are pregnant are not eligible.  The study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and includes annual outpatient visits over a 5 year period.

Evaluations in this study include health histories, physical examinations, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain and spine.  Participants with progressive symptoms from their syringomyelia will be offered surgical treatment, which will require a 7-10 day hospital admission. There is no charge for study-related tests.  Travel costs may be reimbursed.

For more information, contact the Patient Recruitment Office at 800-411-1222 or prpl@cc.nih.gov, or Gretchen Scott, RN, at 301-496-2921. Please refer to study number 10-N-0143.

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Volunteers Needed for Brain Imaging Study

NINDS is looking for volunteers for a brain imaging study.  The study includes both people who have had a concussion and those who have not.  The purpose of the study is to learn more about which parts of the brain are involved in controlling unwanted actions and how this control may be damaged by traumatic brain injury.  Information gained from this study will help scientists better understand how these brain areas might be affected in people after brain injury.

Volunteers will be asked to perform activities that involve moving and suppressing movements during functional magnetic resonance imaging scans and transcranial magnetic stimulation.  The study involves two outpatient visits lasting 2-3 hours each.  The study does not provide any treatment.

Eligible volunteers with a concussion are between 18 and 40 years old, have had at least one concussion, have no metal in the body that would make having an MRI scan unsafe, and have no history of seizures.  Volunteers without a concussion are between 18 and 40 years old, have no metal in the body that would make having an MRI scan unsafe, and have no history of seizures. 

The study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.  There is no cost for participation.  Volunteers will be compensated for their time.  Travel costs may be provided. 

For more information, contact Sarah Levy at levys3@mail.nih.gov or 301-443-4366.  Please refer to study number 10-N-0185.

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