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Funding News - November 2010


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Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
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NIH Offers Extramural Loan Repayment Programs

NIH announces the continued availability of education loan repayment under the extramural loan repayment programs (LRP).

The purpose of the LRP is to recruit and retain highly qualified health professionals as research investigators in clinical, pediatric, health disparities, or contraception and infertility research. There are five individual LRPs. Each provides up to $35,000 annually to repay the educational loan debt of qualified health professionals who agree to perform research within the NIH mission for at least two years, and agree to engage in such research for at least 50 percent of their work schedule.

The five LRPs have specific eligibility requirements and funding set-asides. For more information see the LRP website at http://www.lrp.nih.gov, or contact the Division of Loan Repayment Information Center at 1-866-849-4047 or lrp@nih.gov.

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NINDS Requests Clinical and Data Centers for Parkinson’s Disease Network

NINDS recently issued a request for applications to establish clinical and data coordinating centers for a Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Identification Network (PD-BIN).

PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait imbalance, and other motor, autonomic, sleep, neuropsychiatric, and cognitive symptoms. Although therapies to alleviate PD symptoms exist, none slow or prevent disease onset or progression. Efforts to develop such treatments have been hampered, at least in part, by the lack of reliable biologically-based identifiers for PD.

NINDS will fund a multi-site, multi-purpose PD-BIN to identify biological markers for PD risk, onset, and/or progression, and to encourage development of disease-modifying treatments. The purpose of this announcement is to invite applications to establish clinical and data coordinating centers for the network.

Letters of intent are due on December 18, 2010. Applications are due on January 18, 2011. Potential applicants should contact Dr. Katrina Gwinn, program director, Neurogenetics, NINDS, at 301-496-5745 or gwinnk@ninds.nih.gov, or visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-11-005.html.

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Bioengineering Research Partnerships

NINDS encourages applications to support bioengineering research partnerships. This announcement is made together with 12 other NIH components.

Many of today's biomedical problems are best addressed using a multi-disciplinary approach that extends beyond the traditional biological and clinical sciences. Bioengineering integrates principles from a diverse group of technical and biomedical fields and crosses the boundaries of many scientific disciplines represented throughout academia, laboratories, and industry. The creativity of interdisciplinary teams results in new basic understandings, novel products, and innovative technologies for addressing biomedical problems.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Albert Lee, program director, Extramural Science Programs, NIBIB, at 301-451-4772 or alee@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-234.html.

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Computational Tool Development and Integrative Data Analysis for LINCS

NIH invites applications for computational and integrative data analysis tools for the Library of Integrated Network-Based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program.

This initiative is funded through the NIH Common Fund, which supports cross-cutting programs that are expected to have exceptionally high impact. All Common Fund initiatives encourage investigators to develop bold, innovative, and often risky approaches to address problems that may seem intractable or to seize new opportunities that offer the potential for rapid progress.

The LINCS program supports high-throughput data collection and integrative computational analysis of informative molecular activity and cellular feature signatures. The major aim of the program is to build and provide a long-lasting resource that generates validated responses of different cell types to a broad array of cellular perturbations. This initiative intends to improve and add to the suite of computational tools and approaches available for researchers using LINCS, with a goal of making the tools and approaches widely available for use by the research community.

Letters of Intent Due January 22, 2011

Applications Due February 22, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Jennie Larkin, program director, NHLBI, at 301-435-0513 or larkinj2@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-10-005.html.

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CounterACT

NINDS encourages grant applications for exploratory or developmental translational research on countermeasures against chemical threats (CounterACT). This announcement is made together with 5 other NIH components.

Chemical threats are toxic chemicals that could be released by a deliberate terrorist attack, by accident, or by natural disaster, causing mass casualties. NIH has developed a comprehensive CounterACT program that supports basic, translational, and clinical research aimed at discovering and/or identifying better medical countermeasures against chemical threats, and their movement through the regulatory process. The program’s overarching goal is to enhance medical response capabilities during an emergency. This initiative supports exploratory and developmental translational research projects on therapeutics for reducing death and disease caused by exposure to chemical threats.

Letters of Intent Due January 4, 2011

Applications Due February 1, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. David Jett, program director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS, at 301-496-6035 or jettd@ninds.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-019.html.

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Global Research Initiative Program

NINDS invites grant applications to conduct basic biomedical research relevant to global health. This announcement is made together with 8 other NIH components.

The Global Research Initiative Program promotes the productive development of foreign investigators from low- and middle-income countries, who have trained in the US or in their home countries through an eligible NIH funded research grant/award. After training, participants are expected to continue independent and productive scientific careers, including providing expert training and consultation to others, and/or conducting basic and biomedical research within their home institutions. The program stimulates research on a wide variety of high priority health-related issues, and advances NIH’s efforts to address important global health issues.

Letters of Intent Due December 10, 2010

Applications Due January 10, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS, at 301-496-9523 or liuyuan@ninds.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-278.html.

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HIV-Associated CNS Disease

NINDS and NIMH request grant applications for research on viral and host genetic factors regulating HIV-associated central nervous system disease. This announcement is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R01 and R21.

Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high. There remains much to learn about the evolving mechanisms of neuropathogenesis as people are living longer under therapy. This initiative will stimulate further research on the role of viral and host genetic factors in driving HAND pathophysiology in the setting of long-term treatment. It is a great opportunity for the neuroAIDS field to use state-of-the-art advanced genomic technologies and systems biology approaches to address questions relating to viral and host contribution to HIV neuropathogenesis.

Letters of Intent Due December 6, 2010

Applications Due January 6, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. May Wong, program director, Neural Environment, NINDS, at 301-496-1431 or mw132k@nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-11-020.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-11-021.html.

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Neurobiology of Migraine

NINDS encourages grant applications for research on the neurobiology of migraine. This announcement is made together with 4 other NIH components and is supported by 2 grant mechanisms: R01 and R21.

Migraine headaches affect a large percentage of the population, account for most pain-related emergency room visits, and may persist as a chronic condition that extends throughout life. Despite the prevalence of migraine and a long history of relevant research, many questions remain regarding the pathophysiology and the many factors that influence this complex disorder.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Linda Porter, program director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience, NINDS, at 301-496-9964 or porterl@ninds.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-10-258.html or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-10-259.html.

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NIH Blueprint: Computational Neuroscience Training

NINDS requests applications for training in computational neuroscience. This announcement is affiliated with the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research.

The NIH Blueprint is a framework to enhance cooperative activities among 16 NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices that support research on the nervous system.

The goal of this initiative is to establish new research education and training programs in computational neuroscience, and to support the continuation of meritorious existing programs for undergraduate and predoctoral students. Applicants also may propose to develop a short course or summer courses that can be open to scientists at any stage of their career from the grantee institution as well as other institutions.

Letters of Intent Due December 13, 2010

Applications Due January 13, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Susan Volman, program director, Division of Basic Neurosciences and Behavioral Research, NIDA, at 301-435-1315 or svolman@nida.nih.gov; or Dr. Mimi Ghim, deputy research training coordinator, Office of Science Policy and Communications, NIDA, at 301-402-1918 or ghimm@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-11-005.html.

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Perturbation-Induced Cellular Signatures

NIH invites applications to develop or adapt advanced technologies to detect perturbation-induced cellular signatures.

This initiative is funded through the NIH Common Fund, which supports cross-cutting programs that are expected to have exceptionally high impact. All Common Fund initiatives encourage investigators to develop bold, innovative, and often risky approaches to address problems that may seem intractable or to seize new opportunities that offer the potential for rapid progress.

Cancer biology has benefitted from the systematic and large-scale study of cellular signatures of disease. The time is right to expand the scope of such research beyond cancer and to develop innovative tools to advance it. Knowledge of perturbation-induced cellular signatures could provide significant insight to fundamental issues in biology by addressing, for example, differentiation of signatures among cell states across the lifespan or across levels of cellular complexity and specialization.

Letters of Intent Due January 22, 2011

Applications Due February 22, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Jennifer Couch, chief, Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Branch, Division of Cancer Biology, NCI, at 301-435-5226 or couchj@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-10-004.html.

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Robotics Technology Development and Deployment

NINDS invites small business innovation research applications to develop technologies that will advance the field of robotics. This announcement is made together with 17 other NIH components and 4 other federal agencies: the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Homeland Security.

During the past 5-10 years, tremendous progress in robotics technology has created new opportunities for automating tasks and enriching the lives of humans. NIH supports the development of robotic applications for surgery, health intervention, prostheses, rehabilitation, behavioral therapy, personalized care, and wellness/health promotion. Developing these applications is important to NIH because of the potential significant impact on healthcare in the future.

Letters of Intent Due November 20, 2010

Applications Due December 20, 2010

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Louis Quatrano, director, Behavioral Sciences and Rehabilitation Technologies Program, NICHD, at 301-402-4221 or quatranol@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-279.html.

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Scientific Meetings for Creating Interdisciplinary Research Teams

The Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) requests applications for scientific meetings aimed at creating interdisciplinary teams in basic behavioral and social science research. OppNet is a trans-NIH initiative to expand the agency’s funding of basic behavioral and social sciences research. This announcement includes 29 NIH components.

While scientific breakthroughs increasingly occur through the integration of disciplines or knowledge sharing across disciplines, existing infrastructures and scientific cultures create artificial barriers between disciplines that divide scientists and impede progress. The purpose of this initiative is to encourage interdisciplinary basic behavioral and social science research by a team composed of investigators who, collectively, have not previously collaborated.

Letters of Intent Due November 14, 2010

Applications Due December 14, 2010

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Kara Hall, health scientist, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, NCI, at 301-594-9056 or hallka@mail.nih.gov; Dr. Lis Nielsen, program director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research, NIA, at 301-402-4156 or nielsenli@nia.nih.gov; or Dr. Mariela Shirley, program officer, Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research, NIAAA, at 301-443-9787 or shirleym@mail.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-CA-10-017.html.

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Screenable Disorders in Newborns

NINDS, NICHD, NIDCD, and NIDDK invite grant applications to develop innovative therapies and tools for screenable disorders in newborns.

The goal of newborn screening is to detect potentially fatal or disabling conditions in newborns, thereby providing a window of opportunity for early treatment, often while the child is still asymptomatic. Such early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on the clinical severity of the condition in the affected child. This initiative supports the development of beneficial treatments for infants that have been identified through newborn screening as having potentially fatal or disabling conditions.

Potential applicants should contact Dr. John Porter, program director, Neurogenetics, NINDS, at 301-496-5745 or porterjo@ninds.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-230.html.

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Self-Regulation

The Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) requests applications for basic research on self-regulation. OppNet is a trans-NIH initiative to expand the agency’s funding of basic behavioral and social sciences research. This announcement includes 29 NIH components.

Self-regulatory processes influence health behaviors, economic decision-making, communication, processing of health messages, and persistence in academic and work-related goals. These, in turn, are related to multiple diseases and health outcomes. Understanding the basic mechanisms involved in self-regulation has implications for understanding disease risk, how interventions are designed, how health messages are framed, and how social institutions support or impede individuals’ health goals.

Letters of Intent Due December 6, 2010

Applications Due January 6, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Lis Nielsen, program director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research, NIA, at 301-402-4156 or nielsenli@nia.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-11-010.html.

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Social Environment on Health

The Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) requests applications for research on the effects of social environment on health. OppNet is a trans-NIH initiative to expand the agency’s funding of basic behavioral and social sciences research. This announcement includes 29 NIH components.

Several decades of research have shown that aspects of the social environment are strongly and consistently related to the development of behavioral risk factors for a diverse array of diseases, and to the development, progression, and outcomes of diseases ranging from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes to drug abuse and infectious diseases. This initiative encourages the study of structural, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, cognitive, emotional, and/or biological mechanisms through which the social environment affects health outcomes.

Letters of Intent Due December 6, 2010

Applications Due January 6, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Bethany Griffin Deeds, deputy branch chief, Epidemiology Research Branch, Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research, NIDA, at 301-402-1935 or deedsb@nida.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-11-003.html.

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Tumor Microenvironment Network

NINDS and NCI request applications for multidisciplinary research centers focused on the microenvironment. These centers will form the NCI Tumor Microenvironment Network (TMEN).

The main objective of this initiative is to delineate mechanisms of tumor-stroma interactions in human cancer. Such an effort is likely to generate a more comprehensive understanding of the composition(s) of the stroma in normal tissues as well as of the role(s) of the stroma in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis and in responses to treatment. TMEN research centers are designed to pursue defined, individual research programs as well as engage in cross-network activities and joint projects with other TMEN teams.

Letters of Intent Due December 20, 2010

Applications Due January 20, 2011

Potential applicants should contact Dr. Jane Fountain, program director, Neural Environment, NINDS, at 301-496-1431 or fountai@ninds.nih.gov. For more information visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-CA-10-021.html.

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Persons with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Sought for Study

NINDS scientists are seeking persons with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) to participate in a research study to learn about NF2 tumor development and progression.

Study participants will have a thorough evaluation of their NF2-related tumors and how those tumors affect function (vision, walking, hearing, balance, etc.). All testing—which will include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)—will be performed on an outpatient basis and will be repeated every 6 months.

Eligible persons must have a diagnosis of NF2 by established criteria or genetic testing, be 8 to 75 years old, and be able to have MRIs. Persons who are pregnant, or who have an allergy to MRI contrast or other medical conditions that would limit their ability to participate, may not be eligible.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. There is no cost for study-related tests. Travel costs may be reimbursed.

For more information, contact the Patient Recruitment Office at 800-411-1222, or via email at prpl@cc.nih.gov. Please refer to study number 08-N-0044.

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Persons with Syringomyelia Sought for Study

NINDS is seeking persons with syringomyelia to participate in a research study. This study will follow the natural course of syringomyelia.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and have syringomyelia, presyringomyelia, or Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia. Persons who cannot undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, have bleeding problems, or are pregnant are not eligible. The study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and requires participants to undergo annual outpatient visits over a 5-year period. Evaluations in this study include health histories, physical and neurological examinations, and MRI scans of the brain and spine. Participants with neurological progression will be offered surgical treatment. Participants with no neurological progression will not undergo surgery but will be followed to identify factors that may influence syringomyelia progression. There is no cost for study-related procedures. Travel costs may be reimbursed.

For more information, contact the Patient Recruitment Office at 800-411-1222, or via email at prpl@cc.nih.gov, or Hetty DeVroom, RN, at 301-594-8111. Please refer to study number 10-N-0143.

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