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Funding News - NINDS Notes - October 2006


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders Research Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for research on autism and autism spectrum disorders. This announcement is made together with 6 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 3 funding mechanisms: R01, R21, and R03.

Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with early childhood onset. Autism spectrum disorders share a cluster of impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication and/or the presence of stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities. These complex disorders are usually lifelong, and affect multiple aspects of development, learning, and adaptation in the community. The causes of these disorders are poorly understood, but are thought to include genetic, metabolic, immunologic, or infectious or other environmental influences.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Clinical Trials Group, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-5821; e-mail: dh83f@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-390.html (R01), http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-392.html (R21), or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-391.html (R03).

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Basic and Translational Research in Emotion Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for basic and translational research in emotion. This announcement is made together with 6 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The study of emotion encompasses a wide range of physiological, social, cognitive, and developmental phenomena. It includes investigations of overt behaviors, interpersonal relationships, communication and decision-making, and the environmental circumstances and experiences that shape and elicit emotions. Emotion research can also include the study of licit and illicit psychoactive substances that alter mood, and conversely, the study of how emotions and moods can predispose to, or modulate the effects of, pain or alcohol and psychoactive substances.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Debra Babcock, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-9964; e-mail: db390r@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-380.html.

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Bioengineering Research Grant Applications Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for bioengineering research. This announcement is made together with 16 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R01 and R21.

Many of today's biomedical problems are addressed using a multidisciplinary approach that extends beyond the traditional biological and clinical sciences. Bioengineering integrates principles from a diversity of technical and biomedical fields, and the resulting research provides new basic understandings, novel products, and innovative technologies that improve basic knowledge, health, and quality of life. Bioengineering also crosses the boundaries of scientific disciplines that are represented throughout academia, federal laboratories, and industry.

For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-419.html (R01) or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-418.html (R21).

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Bioengineering Research Partnerships Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for bioengineering research partnerships. This announcement is made together with 12 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Many of today's biomedical problems are best addressed using a multidisciplinary approach that extends beyond the traditional biological and clinical sciences. The primary objective of this announcement is to encourage basic, applied, and translational bioengineering research that could significantly improve human health. Bioengineering integrates physical, engineering, and computational science principles for the study of biology, medicine, behavior, or health. It advances fundamental concepts, creates knowledge from the molecular to the organ systems level, and develops innovative biologicals, materials, processes, implants, devices, and informatics approaches for patient rehabilitation, improving health, and the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease.

Letters of Intent Receipt Date: December 20, 2006.
Application Receipt Date: January 22, 2007.

For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-459.html.

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Research Sought on Brain Disorders in the Developing World

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on brain disorders across the lifespan relevant to developing nations. This announcement is made together with 9 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and the National Alliance for Autism Research (NAAR).

The purpose of this initiative is to support innovative, collaborative research and research training projects-between scientists from developed and developing countries-on brain disorders throughout life, relevant to low- and middle-income nations. The collaborative programs should involve research on neurological or neurodevelopmental function and impairment throughout life, and contribute to the long-term goal of building sustainable research capacity in developing countries to initiate and conduct such research.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-420.html.

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Clinical Trial Planning Grant Applications Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for the NINDS clinical trial planning grant program.

The Institute seeks to fund high-quality clinical trials to evaluate treatments for neurological disorders. The purpose of the program is to provide support for the organization of activities critical for the successful implementation of high-risk, complex, or large-scale clinical trials. It is designed to permit early peer review of the rationale for the proposed clinical trial and provide support for the development of a detailed manual of procedures and other essential elements that are needed before a large, clinical trial can begin.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Scott Janis, Clinical Research Project Manager, Clinical Trials Group, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-9135; e-mail: sj151t@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-460.html.

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Development and Application of PET and SPECT Imaging Ligands Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications to develop and apply positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging ligands as biomarkers for drug discovery and for pathophysiological studies of central nervous system disorders. This announcement is made together with 5 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R21 and R33.

Tremendous opportunities exist for using PET and SPECT imaging in studies of the pathophysiology of brain disorders, but relatively few radioligands are currently available for functional imaging of target molecules implicated in normal brain function, aging, and brain and behavioral disorders. The purpose of this announcement is to support the development of novel radioligands for PET or SPECT imaging in the human brain.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Debra Babcock, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-9964; e-mail: db390r@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-461.html (R21) or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-462.html (R33).

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Global Research Initiative Program Applications Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for the global research initiative program in basic and biomedical sciences. This announcement is made together with 4 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The goal of this initiative is to provide funding opportunities for the increasing pool of foreign basic and biomedical scientists, clinical investigators, nurses, and other health professionals upon their return to their home countries. These opportunities will promote state-of-the-art knowledge of research methods to advance the critical issues in global health through basic and biomedical sciences research and technology development.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-394.html.

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Independent Scientist Award Applications Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for independent scientist awards. This announcement is made together with 12 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The purpose of the award is to foster the development of outstanding scientists and enable them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their field of research. The award provides 3, 4, or 5 years of salary support and "protected time" for newly independent scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, Director, Training and Career Development, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-4188; e-mail: NINDStrainingoffice@ninds.nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-527.html.

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Exploratory Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for exploratory innovations in biomedical computational science and technology. This announcement is made together with 15 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R21 and R01.

Computing and computational tools have become increasingly important in the progress of biomedical research. This initiative seeks fundamental research in biomedical information science and technology as well as for the development of new informatics, computational, and mathematical tools and technologies. An overall goal of this announcement is to support research and development of tools and approaches for computing data.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-411.html (R21) and http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-410.html (R01).

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Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology Initiative Applications Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer (STTR) applications for the innovations in biomedical computational science and technology initiative. This announcement is made together with 15 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R43/R44 (SBIR) and R41/R42 (STTR).

Computational and informatics tools have become increasingly important in the progress of biomedical research. The purpose of this announcement is to support fundamental research in biomedical computing science and technology as well as the development and application of new biocomputing tools or technologies for a particular area of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. Biomedical computing or biomedical information science and technology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, tools for electronic collaboration, and data retrieval, visualization, manipulation, and integration through the development of integrated analytical tools as well as computational research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical models and simulations.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-535.html (SBIR), or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-534.html (STTR).

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Institutional Clinical and Translational Science Award Applications Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for institutional clinical and translational science awards.

This request is an NIH Roadmap Initiative. The NIH Roadmap is an innovative approach to accelerate fundamental discovery and translate that knowledge into effective prevention strategies and new treatments. All NIH institutes and centers participate in Roadmap Initiatives.

Growing barriers between clinical and basic research, along with the ever increasing complexities involved in conducting clinical research, are making it more difficult to translate new knowledge to the clinic-and back again to the bench. These challenges are limiting professional interest in the field and hampering the clinical research enterprise at a time when it should be expanding. The purpose of this initiative is to assist institutions in creating uniquely transformative, novel, and integrative academic homes for clinical and translational science that have the resources to train and advance cadres of well-trained multi- and inter-disciplinary investigators and research teams with access to innovative research tools and information technologies to promote the application of new knowledge and techniques to patient care.

Letters of Intent Receipt Date: December 18, 2006.
Application Receipt Date: January 17, 2007.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Anthony Hayward, Division for Clinical Research Resources, NCRR; telephone: 301-435-0791; e-mail: haywarda@mail.nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-07-002.html. For more information on the NIH Roadmap, visit http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/.

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International Collaboration on Basic Biomedical Research Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for international collaboration on basic biomedical research. This announcement is made together with 10 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The opportunity to collaborate internationally provides access to new information and perspectives, innovative concepts and methods, emerging research technologies, and unique populations and environments important for addressing global health problems. The goal of this initiative is to support collaborative basic biomedical research between scientists supported by NIH and investigators in developing countries. NINDS is specifically interested in supporting collaborations that are relevant to its mission. The institute encourages basic and translational neuroscience research that will lead to the reduction of neurological disease borne by every age group and segment of society throughout the world.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-436.html.

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International Research Collaboration in Behavioral and Social Sciences Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for international research collaboration in behavioral and social sciences. This announcement is made together with 10 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The opportunity to collaborate internationally provides access to new information and perspectives, innovative concepts and methods, emerging research technologies, and unique populations and environments important for addressing global health problems. The goals of this initiative are to support collaborative behavioral and social science research between scientists supported by NIH and investigators in developing countries, and to help build research capabilities and foster further sustained and productive research and research collaborations at the foreign site.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Chief, Office of International Activities, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-437.html.

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Research on the Links Between the Immune System, Brain Function, and Behavior Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for research on the functional links between the immune system, brain function, and behavior. This announcement is made together with 6 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Despite the brain's status as an immune privileged site, an extensive bi-directional communication takes place between the nervous and the immune system in both health and disease. Immune cells and neuroimmune molecules modulate brain function through multiple signaling pathways throughout the lifespan. However, details regarding the extent, routes, or mechanisms whereby immune signaling affects the brain in either normal conditions or during immune challenge and inflammation are largely unexplored. The purpose of this announcement is to identify research opportunities that may help to bridge the gap in understanding how immune cells and their mediators affect brain development, function, and behaviors related to cognition and mood.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Ursula Utz, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1431; e-mail: uu1p@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-533.html.

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Muscular Dystrophy Research Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on the pathogenesis and therapies for muscular dystrophy. This announcement is made together with 3 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Muscular dystrophies-which are characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of muscles-collectively have a high impact on health, affecting tens of thousands of people in the United States alone. Many cases of muscular dystrophy represent new occurrences of disease, where there is no prior family history. Though recent research has increased knowledge about genetic defects associated with many forms of muscular dystrophy, there has not been a corresponding improvement in treatment of these diseases. There is a need to learn more about the pathogenesis of of the diseases and to improve early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Porter, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: jp477n@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-508.html.

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Muscular Dystrophy Research Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on the pathogenesis and therapies for muscular dystrophy. This announcement is made together with 3 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Muscular dystrophies-which are characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of muscles-collectively have a high impact on health, affecting tens of thousands of people in the United States alone. Many cases of muscular dystrophy represent new occurrences of disease, where there is no prior family history. Though recent research has increased knowledge about genetic defects associated with many forms of muscular dystrophy, there has not been a corresponding improvement in treatment of these diseases. There is a need to learn more about the pathogenesis of of the diseases and to improve early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Porter, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1917; e-mail: jp477n@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-508.html.

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National Research Service Awards/Training Grants Available

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) for institutional research training grants. This announcement is made together with 20 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The objective of the NRSA program is to provide predoctoral and postdoctoral research training opportunities for individuals interested in pursuing research careers in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research. The purpose of the NRSA research training program is to help ensure that a diverse and highly trained workforce is available to assume leadership roles related to the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research agenda. Training activities can be in basic biomedical or clinical sciences, behavioral or social sciences, health services research, or any other discipline relevant to the NIH mission.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Stephen Korn, Director, Training and Career Development, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-4188; e-mail: NINDStrainingoffice@ninds.nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-468.html.

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National Research Service Awards/Individual Predoctoral Fellowships Available

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) for individual predoctoral fellowships to promote diversity in health-related research. This announcement is made together with 21 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

These awards provide up to 5 years of support for research training leading to the Ph.D. or equivalent research degree, the combined M.D./Ph.D. degree, or another formally combined professional degree and research doctoral degree in biomedical, behavioral, health services, or clinical sciences. The primary objective of this announcement is to help ensure that diverse pools of highly trained scientists will be available in appropriate research areas to carry out the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, health services, or clinical research agenda. This initiative seeks to improve the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the training of predoctoral students from underrepresented groups, including individuals with disabilities, minority and ethnic groups, and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Michelle Jones-London, Program Director, Office of Minority Health and Research, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-3102; e-mail: mj146o@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-481.html.

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Networks and Pathways Collaborative Research Projects Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for networks and pathways collaborative research projects. This announcement is made together with 11 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The purpose of this announcement is to support research projects that will leverage and complement the ongoing technology development being pursued in the National Technology Centers for Networks and Pathways (TCNPs) program-an NIH Roadmap program. TCNPs are interdisciplinary, combining multiple technologies to create novel approaches to map protein networks and pathways of interaction. The NIH Roadmap is an innovative approach to accelerate fundamental discovery and translate that knowledge into effective prevention strategies and new treatments.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Danilo Tagle, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-5745; e-mail: dt39y@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-522.html.

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Pain Research Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for basic, clinical, and translational research on pain. This announcement is made together with 11 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 3 funding mechanisms: R01, R03, and R21.

Pain is a critical national health problem. Chronic pain affects more than 50 million Americans per year. Pain often results in disability and has a profound effect on quality of life. New advances are needed in every area of pain research, from the micro perspective of molecular sciences to the macro perspective of behavioral and social sciences. Although great strides have been made in some areas-such as the identification of neural pathways of pain-the experience of pain and the challenge of treatment have remained unsolved.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Linda Porter, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-9964; e-mail: lp216a@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-542.html (R21), http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-543.html (R03), or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-544.html (R01).

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Preclinical Therapeutics Development for NeuroAIDS Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications proposing novel models of HIV-related central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) damage that can be used to screen for compounds showing promise as treatments in patients. This announcement is made together with 2 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R21 and R03.

Since the availability of the first antiretroviral therapy zidovudine in 1987 and sequential discoveries of other antiretroviral agents there has been a dramatic decrease in mortality and morbidity among the HIV/AIDS population. However, despite these important advances, the prevalence of HIV-associated mental and neurological disorders is reported to be increasing, in part because of the prolonged lifespan of infected patients. The purpose of this announcement is to encourage the development and/or validation of new in vitro and in vivo models of HIV or HAART-related neurotoxicity that show promise for use in the screening of novel CNS- and PNS-targeted therapeutic compounds.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Michael Nunn, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-1431; e-mail: mn52e@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-528.html (R21) or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-529.html (R03).

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Research Encouraged on the Shared Neurobiology of Fragile X Syndrome and Autism

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on the shared neurobiology of fragile X syndrome and autism.

This announcement is made together with 2 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Health Research Board (HRB) of Ireland, the FRAXA Research Foundation, Cure Autism Now (CAN), the National Alliance for Autism Research (NAAR), and Autism Speaks, and is supported by 2 funding mechanisms: R03 and R21.

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with early childhood onset. Between 2.5 percent and 6 percent of autistic individuals have fragile X syndrome, and approximately 25 percent of children with fragile X have autism. Applications in response to this initiative should focus on a topic related to understanding neural pathways, circuits, systems, and molecules that play a role in the cause or pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome and may be implicated in autism.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Laura Mamounas, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-5745; e-mail: lm92t@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-429.html (R03) or http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-06-430.html (R21).

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Research Sought Targeting Diseases Caused by Protein Misfolding or Misprocessing

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for targeting diseases caused by protein misfolding or misprocessing. This announcement is made together with 2 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The goal of this announcement is to support research to identify and optimize small molecule reagents of any kind that specifically ameliorate a protein folding or processing defect in inherited diseases. An NIH-sponsored scientific conference held in 2004 underscored the importance of protein folding and protein processing by cellular quality control systems in the manifestation of inherited human disease. While protein folding can occur either within the cytoplasm or within the secretory pathway, proteins that use the secretory pathway for folding and trafficking are responsible for a disproportionate share of inherited misfolding diseases.

Letters of Intent Receipt Date: December 12, 2006.
Application Receipt Date: January 12, 2007.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Danilo Tagle, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS; telephone: 301-496-5745; e-mail: dt39y@nih.gov. For a more detailed description of this announcement, visit http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-479.html.

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Individuals with Frontotemporal Dementias Sought for Study

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek persons with frontotemporal dementia, Pick's disease, progressive aphasia, or corticobasal degeneration, aged 21-80, for an evaluation study involving neuropsychological and genetic testing, a neurological examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET).

Eligible persons should be able to travel to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, for the study, and have a diagnosis of one of the following: frontotemporal dementia, Pick's disease, progressive aphasia, or corticobasal degeneration. Persons who are unable to cooperate with neuropsychological testing or unable to travel back and forth to the NIH or who have other serious medical illnesses, may not be eligible.

The study requires a 1- to 2-week inpatient or outpatient stay at NIH at no cost to the participants. Travel to and from NIH is provided for the participants and caregivers.

For more information, contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: jg40b@nih.gov. Please refer to study number 81-N-0010.

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Individuals with Seizures Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek people age 5 and older with seizures for participation in research studies. People with seizures that are not controlled by standard antiepileptic drugs are eligible. However, those with other medical conditions, particularly if on-going therapy is needed, may be excluded. The scientists will record seizures with video-EEG (electroencephalogram) monitoring, and will conduct non-invasive brain imaging tests such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The studies may last several months, with an inpatient stay of up to 2 weeks and 10-15 outpatient visits of about an hour each.

Before patients enter the study, they will be screened in the outpatient clinic. The screening will include a history, a neurological examination, an EEG, and an MRI scan, if needed. Even if patients decide not to enter the study after the initial screening, the investigators may be able to make suggestions for further seizure evaluation or treatment.

The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. There is no cost for participation or for any tests associated with the research.

For further information, contact Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N250, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD 20892-1408; telephone: 301-496-1923. Please refer to study number 01-N-0139.

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