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Funding News - NINDS Notes - October 2005


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Assays Sought for High Throughput Screening in the Molecular Libraries Screening Centers Network

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite applications for assays for high throughput screening to support the molecular libraries screening network (MLSCN).

This program announcement is an NIH Roadmap Initiative. The NIH Roadmap is an innovative approach to accelerate fundamental discovery and translate that knowledge into effective prevention strategies and new treatments. All NIH institutes and centers participate in Roadmap Initiatives.*

The goal of the MLSCN is to optimize and implement a variety of innovative biological, biophysical, and cell-based assays for biological targets or processes for which there are limited selective and potent small molecule modulators available to the public.  This program announcement encourages applications from investigators who have developed innovative assays for use in both basic research and therapeutics development programs, and are interested in having the assays used within the MLSCN.   The MLSCN intends to select approximately 100-200 assays per year to implement within the network of screening centers.

The MLSCN will provide assay implementation, a compound library, high throughput screening, optimization chemistry, and high throughput screening informatics.

LETTERS OF INTENT RECEIPT DATES: Dec. 21, 2005 & April 20, 2006.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATES: Jan. 18, 2006 & May 18, 2006

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Ingrid Li, Molecular Libraries Assay Access Team, NIH Molecular Libraries & Imaging Roadmap, National Institute of Mental Health/NIH/DHHS, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7185, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-443-5288;
fax:  301-402-4740; e-mail:  ili1@mail.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-147.html
For more information on the NIH Roadmap, please visit the web site at: http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/.

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Applications Sought for Collaborative Neurological Sciences Awards

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS (CMHRA) invite applications for collaborative neurological sciences (CNS) awards.*

The NINDS, NIDA, and NIMH CMHRA are committed to expanding neuroscience research opportunities for faculty, students, and fellows at minority institutions.  The purpose of the CNS award is to encourage collaborative research investigations among scientists at minority institutions and grantees from leading research laboratories who have NIH or equivalent grant support to conduct neuroscience research.   Funding from the CNS award will lead to joint research efforts and publications, shared resources, exchange of techniques, and other scientific act ivities to enable applicants at minority institutions to successfully compete for independent research funding during the performance period of award.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to:  stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases and disorders; episodic neurological states, such as epilepsy; chronobiology, circadian rhythms, and sleep; tumors of the nervous system; demyelinating and immunologically mediated disorders of the nervous system; neuro-AIDS (basic and clinical) and other viral-associated diseases of the nervous system; HIV infection of the central nervous system; neuropsychiatric risks, complications, and treatment related to hiv infection in the brain; neuromuscular and peripheral nerve disorders; fundamental neural processes; pain; neurodegenerative diseases and disorders; trauma and injury to the nervous system; repair and plasticity of the nervous system; behavioral and cognitive neuroscience; neurogenetics; nervous system development; and neurological impacts associated with drugs of abuse and the medical/mental/biological consequences and co-morbidity related to chronic drug use.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Alfred Gordon, Associate Direct or, Office of Minority Health and Research, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2149, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-3102; fax:  301-594-5929; e-mail:   ag38x@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-149.html.

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Applications Sought to Develop PET and SPECT Ligands for Brain Imaging

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer (STTR) grant applications to develop novel radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the human brain.  This announcement is made together with 4 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Tremendous opportunities exist for using PET and SPECT imaging in studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of brain disorders, but relatively few radioligands are currently available for functional imaging of target molecules implicated in normal brain function and in brain and behavioral disorders.  This initiative is intended to stimulate the development of radioligands for molecular targets that are of broad interest to the scientific community.

The widespread availability and use of these radioligands are expected to accelerate research on identifying and characterizing the neural circuits and pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of brain disorders, and to facilitate the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new compounds as potential therapeutic agents.

For more information, potential applicants should contact  Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Direct or, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2175, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1917; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:   dc342b@nih.gov

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-122.html.

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Applications Encouraged for Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Awards

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for mentored patient-oriented research career development awards (K23).  This announcement is made together with 20 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The purpose of the K23 award is to support the career development of investigators who have made a commitment to focus on patient-oriented research.  The award is also intended to:  encourage research-oriented clinicians to develop independent research skills and gain experience in advanced methods and experimental approaches needed to become independent investigators conducting patient-oriented research, and increase the pool of clinical researchers who can conduct patient-oriented studies, capitalizing on the discoveries of biomedical research and translating them to clinical settings.

The award provides support for 3 to 5 years of supervised study and research for clinically trained professionals who have the potential to develop into productive, clinical investigators focusing on patient-oriented research.  Applicants must justify the need for a period of mentored research experience and provide a convincing case that the proposed period of support and the career development plan will substantially enhance their careers as independent investigators in patient-oriented research.

For more information, potential applicants should contact the Office of Training and Career Development, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2154, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-4188; fax:  301-402-4370; e-mail:  nindstrainingoffice@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-143.html.

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Probes for Microimaging the Nervous System Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer (STTR) grant applications for research and development of probes useful in imaging the structure and function of the brain and other parts of the nervous system.  This announcement is made together with 4 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

An emerging area of scientific opportunity is the design and use of probes to study structure and function at the molecular and subcellular levels in living cells. Approaches and tools such as labels that attach to specific peptide or nucleotide moieties, fluorescent resonance energy transfer, green fluorescent protein (and mutant color variants), and genetically engineered voltage or ion-sensitive fluorophores are making it possible to visualize not only the distribution of molecular species in cells, but the manner in which they interact.

Topics of research interest include, but are not limited to:  bioengineering of small-molecule, sterically benign probes that can be genetically linked to proteins that play important roles in cell function; research, development, and engineering of probes that can report quantitative information regarding particular molecular or subcellular events or structures; research and development of probes that attach to specific sites on proteins that can be observed through multiple modalities; and research and development of caged molecules that provide temporally and spatially controlled release of molecular probes.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Direct or, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2175, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1917; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:   dc342b@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-120.html.

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Applications Sought for Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD Fellows

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) for individual predoctoral MD/PhD fellows.  This announcement is made together with 7 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The enormous complexity of biomedical and behavioral science today prevents the standard course of study at most medical schools from providing the experience necessary to develop researchers.   Integrated curricula that combine training for the MD degree with extensive research experience have been developed because scientists who are both medical doctors and trained scientists play a vital role in helping to bring the highest scientific standards into basic, clinical, translational, epidemiologic, prevention, and services research settings.

This award is for promising applicants who have the potential to become productive, independent, highly trained physician-scientists—including patient-oriented physician-scientists—in their scientific mission areas.  This funding opportunity supports individual predoctoral F30 fellowships with the expectation that these training opportunities will increase the number of future investigators in basic, translational, and clinical research who are physician-scientists.

For more information, potential applicants should contact the Office of Training and Career Development, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2154, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-4188; fax:  301-402-4370; e-mail:  nindstrainingoffice@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-151.html.

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Applications Sought for Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Short-term Institutional Research Training Grants

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Short-term Institutional Research Training Grants.  This announcement is made together with 13 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The objective of the short-term research training (T35) program is to develop or enhance research training opportunities for individuals interested in careers in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research.   The program may also be used to support other types of predoctoral and postdoctoral training in focused, often emerging, scientific areas relevant to the mission of the NIH funding institute or center. The training program must be in either the basic, clinical, or behavioral research aspects of the health-related sciences.

This program is intended to encourage students to pursue research careers by exposure to, and short-term involvement in, the health-related sciences. The training should be of sufficient depth to enable the trainees—upon completion of the program—to have thorough exposure to the principles underlying the conduct of research.

For more information, potential applicants should contact the Office of Training and Career Development, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2154, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-4188; fax:  301-402-4370; e-mail:  nindstrainingoffice@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-117.html.

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Applications Sought for Exploratory/Developmental Projects in Translational Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for exploratory/developmental projects in translational research.*

Remarkable insights have been made recently into the molecular, genetic, and cellular bases of neurological disease.   In many cases, developmental work must be completed before the basic research results can be translated into effective therapies.   A key requirement for successful therapeutic development is the characterization of new assays, models, tools, and technologies that provide for reliable discovery and testing of therapies.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to:  identification of targets for therapeutic intervention; development of assays that permit the preliminary screening of candidate therapeutics; development of animal models that permit further evaluation of candidate therapeutics and/or toxicology studies; development of tools and technologies that can be directly used for therapy development; preliminary identification of candidate therapeutics that can be evaluated through further preclinical testing; and testing of therapeutics for efficacy in cell-based or animal models of a neurological disorder.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Director, Technology Development Group, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD   20892; telephone:  301-496-1779; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-157.html.

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Applications Sought for NINDS Cooperative Program in Translational Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for the NINDS Cooperative Program in Translational Research.*

Recent discoveries in the neurosciences offer promising opportunities for treatment of neurological disorders.  The goal of this announcement is to implement a program of cooperative agreements that will support milestone-driven projects focused on the identification and preclinical testing of new therapies.

This program is intended to stimulate the development of partnerships between basic and clinical investigators, and agreements between the academic and industrial sectors, so that translational research in neuroscience can flourish as a cooperative process leading to new and effective interventions for neurological disorders.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Director, Technology Development Group, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1779; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-158.html.

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Applications Sought for NINDS Cooperative Small Business Awards in Translational Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer (STTR) applications for NINDS cooperative small business awards in translational research.*

The NINDS translational research program supports the preclinical development of treatments for neurological disorders.  The program uses a number of grant and cooperative agreement mechanisms to fund both exploratory/developmental work and milestone-driven therapy development programs.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to:  identification of targets for therapeutic intervention; development of assays that permit the preliminary screening of candidate therapeutics; development of animal models that permit further evaluation of candidate therapeutics and/or toxicology studies; development of tools and technologies that can be directly used for therapy development; preliminary identification of candidate therapeutics that can be evaluated through further preclinical testing; and testing of therapeutics for efficacy in cell-based or animal models of a neurological disorder. 

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Direct or, Technology Development Group, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1779; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-159.html.

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Applications Sought for NINDS Mentored Research and Clinical Scientist Development Awards in Translational Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for NINDS Mentored Research and Clinical Scientist Development Awards in Translational Research.*

Recent discoveries in neuroscience offer promising opportunities for improved therapies for neurological disorders. As part of its mission to reduce the burden of neurological disease, NINDS is committed to encouraging the translation of these basic discoveries into new treatments.  This award enables investigators to build a program of translational research in neurological disorders under the guidance of an experienced mentor. The training received through this program has two key elements—a research project, conducted under the supervision of the mentor, and a career development program, which will provide broad training for the applicant in the preclinical development of therapies.

This opportunity is available to investigators with PhDs (or equivalent research-intensive degrees) who are in the early stages of establishing independent research careers, and investigators with clinical doctoral degrees or PhDs in a clinical discipline. Applicants should have significant postdoctoral or clinical fellowship experience or a junior faculty appointment at the applicant organization.

For more information, potential applicants should contact  Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Director, Technology Development Group, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD   20892; telephone:  301-496-1779; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-160.html.

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Applications Requested for Research on the Biology of RNA Interference

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests grant applications for research to improve uptake, stability, processing, and delivery of RNA interference specific to target tissues and specific cell types.  This announcement is made together with 6 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective post-transcriptional strategy for silencing genes.  The purpose of this initiative is to stimulate research to understand uptake and processing of RNAi by target tissues; to assess stability, half-life, and off-target effects in target tissues; and to determine optimal delivery methods for uptake by the target tissues.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to, studies to:  determine stability and half-life of RNAi and its potential toxicity in cells and tissues; elucidate delivery and uptake processes in target tissues and cells; develop chemical modifications that will allow or regulate distribution; determine off-target effects in target tissues and cells; develop chemical modifications that will minimize off-target effects; and identify chemical modifications that will enhance the pharmacokinetic properties of small interfering RNA (siRNA).

LETTERS OF INTENT RECEIPT DATE:  December 21, 2005.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE:  January 18, 2006.

For more information, potential applicants should contact  Dr. Danilo Tagle, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2133, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-5745; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  dt39y@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at:   http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-05-019.html.

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Applications Requested to Develop New Therapeutics and Monitoring Technologies for Type 1 Diabetes and its Complications

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer (STTR) applications to develop new therapeutics and monitoring technologies for type 1 diabetes and its complications.  This announcement is made together with 5 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Type I diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that destroys the insulin-producing cells and affects an estimated one million Americans—usually with onset in childhood or young adulthood. The disease markedly impairs quality of life and shortens life expectancy.  This announcement is intended to support innovative research on T1D and its complications.

Areas of research interest include, but are not limited to, studies to:  develop high throughput assays based on biologic pathways likely involved in the pathogenesis of T1D and its complications that could be used to screen molecular libraries for novel therapeutic agents; explore different islet/beta cell sources (pig, fish, others) for xenotransplantation and their possible humanization to make them more functionally efficient and able to avoid rejection by the recipient immune system; improve efficiency and efficacy of islet isolation methods in order to obtain higher yield and viability; develop methods for ex-vivo expansion of cadaveric islets; develop technology to improve transportation and maintenance of healthy islets; develop accurate surrogate markers (biomarkers) to monitor the progression to development of T1D and its complications or for quantitatively assessing response to therapy intended to prevent or reverse the disease; develop methods for measuring the pancreatic beta cell mass, function, and/or detection of early inflammation; and develop assays able to diagnose islet rejection at an early stage.

LETTERS OF INTENT RECEIPT DATE:  February 15, 2006.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE:  March 15, 2006.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Porter, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2142, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1917; fax:  301-402-1501; e-mail:  jp477n@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-05-010.html.

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Applications for Mechanisms in Immunomodulation Trials Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests grant applications for clinical trials of immunomodulatory interventions for immune system mediated diseases, and vaccines for preventive and treatment of non-HIV/AIDS infectious diseases.  This announcement is made together with 3 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The mechanisms underlying immunologic interventions are poorly understood even in cases where efficacy has been shown.  In addition, clinical trials supported by industry and other sources, including NIH, often do not include studies of underlying mechanisms.  High priority should be given to the use of patient samples from clinical trials in immunologic diseases for studies of the basic underlying mechanisms of therapeutic effect, immunologic function, and disease pathogenesis.  Applications submitted in response to this initiative will be subject to a hyperaccelerated review/award process.

Potential areas of research interest include, but are not limited to, studies to:  quantify disease-related, autoreactive, or alloreactive lymphocytes using methods such as MHC/peptide tetramers, chimeric antibodies, or very early activation antigens; assess reagents that can identify newly recognized populations of regulatory T cells which appear to be altered in autoimmune disease; identify and evaluate cytokine and cytokine receptor polymorphisms and analysis for genetic linkage to disease; use high throughput technologies to identify and evaluate genes activated in disease sites; identify useful surrogate markers that correlate with disease activity and/or response to intervention or vaccine; compare immune parameters between peripheral blood samples and biopsy samples from sites of disease; and assess potential causative environmental agents through the use of molecular evidence.

Letters of intent are due at least 1 month prior to application due date.

Applications are accepted on the 9th of each month.  The last receipt date will be June 9, 2006.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Ursula Utz, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2134, Bethesda, MD  20892; telephone:  301-496-1431; fax:  301-480-2424; e-mail:  uu1p@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this request for applications, please visit the NIH web site at:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-05-028.html.

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Individuals with Fabry Disease Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek individuals with Fabry disease for a study to collect information about the disorder that will be critical to the design of future clinical trials of an investigational, new oral drug used to treat certain individuals with Fabry disease.

Eligible participants are males, age 18 years or older with Fabry disease whose mutated alpha-galactosidase A enzyme can be made more active.  People with significant medical disorders other than Fabry disease may be ineligible to participate.

Participants will undergo a series of tests and procedures over 5 days (5-8 hours per day as inpatients).

The study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.   All travel arrangements to and from NIH will be coordinated through the Developmental and Metabolic Neurology Branch (DMNB) under the supervision of Ms. Cheryl Hipple (1-800-258-0299).  Although the costs of travel may be reimbursed by NIH on many occasions, this cannot always be guaranteed.  Participants will bear no direct costs for any of the tests performed at the NIH Clinical Center.

For more information, contact the principal investigator, Dr. Raphael Schiffmann, DMNB, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 3D03, 10 Center Drive MSC 1260, Bethesda, MD  20892-1260, telephone: 301-496-1465, fax:  301-480-8354, email:  rs4e@nih.gov. Please refer to study number 05-N-0129.  More information on this study can be found at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00106912?order=5.

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Individuals with Frontotemporal Dementias Sought for Study

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek persons with frontotemporal dementia, Pick's disease, progressive aphasia or corticobasal degeneration, aged 21-80, for an evaluation study involving neuropsychological and genetic testing, a neurological examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET).

Eligible persons should be able to travel to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, for the study, and have a diagnosis of one of the following:   frontotemporal dementia, Pick's disease, progressive aphasia, or corticobasal degeneration.   Persons who are unable to cooperate with neuropsychological testing or unable to travel back and forth to the NIH or who have other serious medical illnesses, may not be eligible.

The study requires a 1- to 2-week inpatient or outpatient stay at NIH at no cost to the participants.  Travel to and from NIH is provided for the participants and caregivers. 

For more information, contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440;  telephone:   301-496-0220; fax:  301-480-2909;
e-mail: jg40b@nih.gov.  Please refer to study number 81-N-0010.

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Individuals with Seizures Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek people age 5 and older with seizures for participation in research studies. People with seizures that are not controlled by standard antiepileptic drugs are eligible.  However, those with other medical conditions, particularly if on-going therapy is needed, may be excluded.  The scientists will record seizures with video-EEG (electroencephalogram) monitoring, and will conduct non-invasive brain imaging  tests such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.  The studies may last several months, with an inpatient stay of up to two weeks and 10-15 outpatient visits of about an hour each. 

Before patients enter the study, they will be screened in the outpatient clinic.  The screening will include a history, a neurological examination, an EEG, and an MRI scan, if needed.  Even if patients decide not to enter the study after the initial screening, the investigators may be able to make suggestions for further seizure evaluation or treatment. 

The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.   All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.  There is no cost for participation or for any tests associated with the research. 

For further information, contact Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N250, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD  20892-1408; telephone:  301-496-1923.  Please refer to study number 01N-0139.

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