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Funding News - NINDS Notes - November 2000


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Applications Sought on Basic and Translational Research on Emotion

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) encourage grant applications on the processes and mechanisms involved in the experience and expression of emotion.

The study of emotion encompasses a wide range of psychological, social, developmental, and biological phenomena, including characteristic expressive signals, alterations in physiology, and subjective feeling states. Central and autonomic nervous system activity and the role of cognitive processing in emotion also are important subjects for study, as is the contribution of emotional and motivational systems to cognitive faculties such as perception, attention, memory, and motor control.

Examples of potential research areas include: the relationships among behavioral, expressive, physiological, and subjective aspects of emotion; the continuities across, and distinctions among, reflex, emotion, mood, temperament, emotional trait, and emotional disorder; the extent to which behavioral, expressive, physiological, and subjective measures of emotion can identify intent in individuals at risk for suicidal, violent, or self-injurious behavior within the context of preventive interventions; the biological and experimental sources of individual differences in emotional reactivity and regulation throughout development; the determinants, age-specific characteristics, and consequences of emotional attachments across the lifespan; how cultural and socialization processes influence the experience and expression of emotion; and the neuroanatomical and neurochemical processes involved in emotional states and emotion-based individual differences.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Emmeline Edwards, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2109, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ee48r@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-105.html.

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Research on HIV-1 Infection and the Peripheral Nervous System Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) invite grant applications for research on the effect of HIV-1 infection on the peripheral nervous system and sensory organs.

Although abnormalities of the peripheral nervous system associated with HIV-1 infection are not generally life threatening, they tend to occur relatively early in the course of the disease and contribute significantly to morbidity. Prompt recognition and effective treatment of these disorders could dramatically improve the quality of life of patients.

Examples of potential research areas include studies on: the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) and the properties of the blood-spinal cord barrier under normal and pathological conditions associated with HIV-1 infection; the etiology of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy; the pathogenesis of the demyelinating HIV-1 associated neuropathies; the role, in producing demyelination, of molecular mimicry resulting from homology of segments of HIV-1 genes and protein products with sequences in the myelin protein; the ability of drugs used in HAART therapy to pass the BNB in sufficient concentrations to be effective; the mechanisms of the neurotoxic effects produced by drugs commonly used in HAART therapy and the development of less toxic agents; the development of an animal model of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy; maladaptive responses to HIV-associated neuropathic pain; adaptive responses, such as unique coping strategies for dealing with HIV-induced neuropathic pain; and the neurotoxic effects of HIV medications on the peripheral sensory organs.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-00-123.html.

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NINDS Seeks Applications on Programs of Excellence in Biomedical Computing

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for planning grants that lead to the establishment of national programs of excellence in biomedical computing. This announcement is made together with 16 other NIH components.*

Computing and computational tools have become increasingly important in enabling progress in biomedical research. There exists an expanding opportunity to speed the progress of biomedical research through the power of computing especially in areas concerning management and analysis of data, and modeling biological processes.

Some potential areas of research include: databases, querying approaches, information retrieval, and data visualization; computing algorithms and new analysis and statistical methodologies for social science research related to areas of biomedical interest such as population aging; new approaches to data integration; and research and development of models or simulation environments.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2110B, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1917; fax: (301) 480-2424; email: liuyuan2@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-00-102.html.

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Applications on Biomedical Information Science and Technology Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for innovative research on biomedical information science and technology to promote the progress of biomedical research. This announcement is made together with 20 other NIH components.*

Computing and computational tools have become increasingly important in enabling progress in biomedical research. The promotion of biomedical information science and technology with biomedical research should result in new digital and electronic tools that will have substantial impact on broad areas of biomedical research.

Some potential areas of research interest include: tools for data collection, archiving large data sets, and electronic communication; research on databases, querying approaches, information retrieval, and data visualization; analysis tools for interpreting large data sets; computing algorithms and new analysis and statistical methodologies for social science research related to areas of biomedical interest such as population aging; research on new approaches to data integration; development of platform-independent translational tools for data exchange; research and development of models or simulation environments; tools or models to promote interoperability; and development of web-based linkage tools for data sharing.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2110B, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1917; fax: (301) 480-2424; email: liuyuan2@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-117.html.

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Applications on Biomedical Information Science and Technology Sought (SBIR/STTR)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer research (STTR) applications for research on biomedical information science and technology to promote the progress of biomedical research. This announcement is made together with 20 other NIH components.*

Computing and computational tools have become increasingly important in enabling progress in biomedical research. The promotion of biomedical information science and technology with biomedical research should result in new digital and electronic tools that will have substantial impact on broad areas of biomedical research.

Some potential areas of research interest include: tools for data collection, archiving large data sets, and electronic communication; research on databases, querying approaches, information retrieval, and data visualization; analysis tools for interpreting large data sets; computing algorithms and new analysis and statistical methodologies for social science research related to areas of biomedical interest such as population aging; research on new approaches to data integration; development of platform-independent translational tools for data exchange; research and development of models or simulation environments; tools or models to promote interoperability; and development of web-based linkage tools for data sharing.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2110B, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1917; fax: (301) 480-2424; email: liuyuan2@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-118.html.

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NINDS Seeks Applications for Research Relevant to Space Flight

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for ground-based research on basic, applied, and clinical biomedical and behavioral problems relevant to space flight. This announcement is made together with 9 other NIH institutes and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Space flight affords a unique opportunity to study and characterize basic biological and behavioral mechanisms in the absence of gravity—one of the fundamental forces that shapes life on earth. In addition, space flight presents unique environmental stressors to individuals, and the study of responses to these stressors will provide new insights into how organisms adapt.

Potential research areas include neurology, musculoskeletal biology, immunology, cardiovascular functioning, integrative physiology, cognition and problem solving under stress and isolation, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism and drug delivery, and diagnosis and treatment of diseases or injury by both ground support and space flight crews. Use of hyper- or hypo-gravity, as research tools or models, is encouraged.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: heet@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-00-088.html.

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Applications for Research on Functional MRI and Intervention for Cognitive Deficits After Traumatic Brain Injury Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request applications for research studies on functional MRI (fMRI) and intervention for cognitive deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to encourage research on functional imaging of brain activity in brain-injured individuals with complex cognitive deficits that constitute altered executive functioning. Imaging studies of the brain have been responsible for advances in the treatment of many aspects of brain function, as well as in understanding the functional loci of many neurological disorders. In TBI, imaging has been very useful in diagnosis and development of management strategies, and in the acute stages after injury. Additional studies in functional imaging will help to unravel the long-term consequences of TBI, and aid in further diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.

Examples of potential areas of research include: studies using fMRI to follow changes in activation in the injured brain during sub-acute and chronic stages; use of fMRI to correlate brain activity/structure in TBI with specific cognitive deficits within the domain of executive function after TBI; assessment of the patterns of activation within the limbic system; use of functional imaging to assess changes and localize activity in specific brain regions during cognitive activities in persons with cognitive deficits after TBI; studies to help understand the particular vulnerability of regions that contribute to executive function, and the pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to these deficits; studies to monitor the longitudinal changes in brain regions that directly contribute to TBI deficits in executive function, as well as evaluating the therapeutic effects of behavioral, pharmacological, and other therapeutic interventions; use of functional imaging to assess changes in activation of brain regions after specific interventions directed at memory, attention, concentration, comprehension, insight, or other components of executive/cognitive function; fMRI studies to help evaluate current treatment and rehabilitation strategies and test their efficacy; and studies to develop and validate surrogate markers based on fMRI to monitor progress in TBI as related to executive function.

Application Receipt Date: February 15, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Mary Ellen Michel, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2222, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 402-1501; email: mm108w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-01-007.html.

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Patients with Menkes Disease Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with Menkes disease—a genetic disorder affecting the metabolism of copper—for a study of early copper histidine therapy. In the study, researchers will evaluate the effects of early copper histidine in patients with Menkes disease, and correlate specific molecular defects with responses to treatment.

Eligible patients must be diagnosed at or shortly after birth as having Menkes disease.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Stephen Kaler, NINDS, NIH, Building 31, Room 1B-03, 31 Center Drive MSC 2082, Bethesda, MD 20892-2082; telephone: (301) 496-8368; fax: (301) 402-1073; email: sgk@box-s.nih.gov.

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Children with Porencephaly, Stroke, and Cerebral Palsy Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking children with porencephaly, stroke, and cerebral palsy for a study of abnormal acquired and genetic coagulation factors. In the study, researchers will measure a series of potential risk factors for stroke that include autoimmune, inflammatory, and genetic clotting factor abnormalities. By identifying the factors that contribute to childhood stroke, porencephaly, and cerebral palsy, researchers hope this study will lay the groundwork for future research projects that will explore potential treatments.

Eligible patients must be less than 15 years of age with a history of porencephaly, cerebral infarction (stroke), and/or cerebral palsy and have a diagnosis of porencephaly or stroke confirmed by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and/or Doppler ultrasonography.

The study consists of a 30-minute telephone interview/questionnaire and a blood sample, and will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Karin Nelson or Dr. John Lynch, NINDS, NIH, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 5S220, Bethesda, MD 20892-1447; telephone: (301) 496-1714; fax: (301) 496-2358; email: lynchj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Stuttering or Other Speech Articulation Disorders Sought

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking family members with stuttering or other speech articulation disorders—such as phonological disorders—for a genetic study and to develop criteria for defining and differentiating patients with stuttering from those with other speech disorders. Stuttering is characterized by sound and syllable repetitions and consonant/vowel prolongations. Speech articulation or phonological disorders are related, but different, speech disorders characterized by omissions, substitutions, or distortions of sounds.

To be eligible, participants must have developmental stuttering with onset prior to puberty, with or without subsequent recovery, or developmental phonological disorders such as speech sound omissions or errors during conversational speech with poor error awareness, with or without subsequent recovery. Patients who developed stuttering following brain injury are not eligible.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Kimberly Bidus, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D38, 10 Center Drive MSC 1164, Bethesda, MD 20892-1164; telephone: (301) 496-9367; fax: (301) 480-0803; email: bidusk@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Vocal Fold Paralysis for a Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking affected and unaffected members of families with vocal fold paralysis for a study to improve understanding of the disorder's pathophysiology and to relate the occurrence of the disorder to the genetic pattern of inheritance. Vocal fold paralysis—a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder—can cause difficulty with vocal fold movement for breathing, voice, and sometimes, swallowing.

To be eligible, participants must be ages 5 to 75 and members of a family with more than one person affected with vocal fold paralysis. Family members may qualify if their condition is due to an unknown cause and has occurred over at least two generations. Family members may not qualify if their condition was caused by traumatic injury.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Christy Ludlow, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D38, 10 Center Drive MSC 1164, Bethesda, MD 20892-1164; telephone: (301) 496-9367; fax: (301) 480-0803; email: ludlowc@ninds.nih.gov.

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