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Funding News - NINDS Notes - October 2001


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Research on Cachexia and Quality of Life Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) encourage grant applications for research related to the prevention and management of cachexia to improve the quality of life.* Cachexia is a condition of severe malnutrition-characterized by anorexia, weight loss, and muscle wasting-that occurs as a consequence of chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis, cerebral palsy, cancer, AIDS, congestive heart failure, failure to thrive in older populations, end-stage organ failure, neurological degenerative diseases, chronic obstructive lung disease, chronic liver disease, and chronic renal failure. Numerous educational interventions are available for patients and families to treat and manage physical and emotional symptoms associated with cachexia to improve quality of life. However, these interventions have not been scientifically validated. Potential areas of research interest include studies to: determine which symptoms of cachexia are amenable to metabolic or biochemical interventions and which symptoms require behavioral interventions in order to improve quality of life; identify and test nutritional, pharmacological, and psychoneuroimmunological interventions to prevent or treat the anticipated onset of anorexia with cachexia; test biobehavioral interventions to promote quality of life in cachectic patients who have different underlying conditions or diseases; compare and contrast traditional treatments alone or in tandem with alternative or complementary therapies to arrest cachexia in two or more different underlying conditions or diseases; identify biological, immunological, chemical, genetic, or behavioral markers to be used as an index of successful outcome measures in cachexia or the treatment and management of cachexia; explore regimens to improve dyspnea, impaired mobility, pain, anorexia and fatigue associated with cachexia; explore the role of the neuroendocrine system in the development of cachexia; and examine the contribution of cachexia to the progression of neurodegenerative disease. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Jill Heemskerk, Program Director, Neurodegeneration Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2204, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5680; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: jh440o@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-109.html.

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Research on Chronic Pain Management Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for research on the management of chronic pain across the lifespan. This announcement is made together with 8 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).* There are more than 50 million Americans who experience chronic pain and more than half of dying patients experience moderate to severe pain during the last days of their life. Pain is a frequent cause for doctor visits, with approximately 45 percent of the population seeking medical help for pain at some point in their lives. Pain is found across the lifespan and it is estimated that 4 out of every 10 people with moderate or severe pain do not get adequate relief. Potential areas for research include studies to: test interventions to remove barriers to effective treatment of pain for all patients including those who are underserved; determine factors associated with the under-reporting of chronic pain and/or reporting that a treatment is effective when pain is not relieved; develop and test measurement tools to assess chronic pain in patients who are unable to verbalize their degree or type of pain; further explore the relationship between painful procedures and future pain sensitivity in premature infants; test innovative methods for translating scientific advances in pain management into practice settings; identify which of the patient barriers cause or result in psychological distress; identify the patient and/or healthcare provider barriers associated with the underusage or undertreatment of pain specific for different cultural and ethnic/minority populations; determine whether sensitivity or reactivity to pain is affected by dementia in the elderly; study nociceptive pathways in older people with and without chronic pain using neuroimaging methods; and assess the medical/health consequences of abused/over-used pain medications. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Cheryl Kitt, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2116, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: kittc@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-115.html.

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Epilepsy Research (Junior Investigators Exploratory/Developmental Awards)

Epilepsy Research Applications from Junior Investigators Sought The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites exploratory/developmental grant applications for translational research on epilepsy.* The purpose of this program announcement is to focus attention of junior investigators on translational research in epilepsy, to promote the interaction of basic researchers and clinical scientists, and to provide preliminary information leading to the prevention and cure of epilepsy. The ultimate goals are to effect meaningful advances in understanding the factors that contribute to epileptogenesis, and develop interventions and effective treatments that improve the quality of life of people with the disorder. Examples of potential research include: adaptation of models of neuronal development, injury or degeneration to the study of epilepsy and epileptogenesis; novel strategies and hypotheses that enhance understanding of the mechanisms of pathogenesis; proposals to identify genes involved in the epilepsies; studies directed at the development of therapeutic regimens; and development of new technologies relevant to the areas of emphasis in this initiative. For more information, potential applicants should contact Margaret Jacobs, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2110, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1917; fax: (301) 480-2424; e-mail: mj22o@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-01-111.html.

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Research on Inflammatory Muscle Disease Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) invite grant applications for research on the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory muscle disease. * Inflammatory muscle disease includes a number of different conditions characterized by muscle inflammation and repeated tissue degeneration and regeneration. Although there have been tremendous advances on the understanding of the cell biology, physiology, and molecular genetics of skeletal muscle, there is little information about how normal muscle cell function is affected by inflammatory processes. Potential areas of research interest include: clarification of the processes by which muscle cells are damaged and repaired in inflammatory muscle disease; exploration of immune responses in muscle diseases; studies that establish and clarify the role of cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses to muscle substances and muscle-related structures; clarification of molecular and cellular aspects of tissue degeneration in inflammatory muscle disease; studies aimed at exploring pathogenetic mechanisms involving mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress; deeper exploration of the role of inflammation in genetic muscle diseases; delineation of the potential role of neurogenic influences in the origin of inflammatory muscle disease; studies that help define standard approaches to evaluate disease activity and damage and clinical outcomes; studies that help develop improved diagnostic procedures, using improved imaging techniques to better understand mechanisms of inflammatory muscle disease and monitor treatment; exploration of new types of therapy, including gene transfer and use of muscle stem cells; exploration of pharmacological interventions, including evaluations of the use of steroids; development, use, and sharing of appropriate animal models for inflammatory muscle disease; studies of the involvement of apoptotic cell death in the process of muscle fiber degeneration; and exploration of the relationship between inflammatory cells, muscle cell death, and blood vessels. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-131.html.

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Applications for Pilot Studies for Clinical Trials Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for pilot studies for clinical trials in neurological disorders.* The objective of this program announcement is to increase the quality of clinical research to evaluate interventions for the treatment or prevention of neurological disease, and to obtain preliminary data and conduct studies to support the rationale for a subsequent full-scale clinical trial of interventions to treat or prevent neurological disease. Examples of potential research include: studies to refine the intervention strategy (dosage, duration, delivery system) and define the target population, and collection of preliminary data for establishing measures of efficacy and safety. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Marler, Associate Director for Clinical Trials, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2216, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9135; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: jml37f@nih.gov; or Dr. Barbara Radziszewska, Clinical Research Project Manager, Clinical Trials Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2216, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9135; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: br94h@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-01-119.html.

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Research on the Role of Antioxidants in the Prevention of Diabetic Complications Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Eye Institute (NEI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the Office of Dietary Supplements encourage grant applications for research on the use of antioxidants to prevent diabetic complications.* Prevention and treatment of long-term complications remain a critical problem in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the United States, diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness in working-age adults, of new cases of end-stage renal disease, and of non-traumatic lower leg amputations. In addition, cardiovascular complications are now the leading cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality, particularly among women and the elderly. Examples of potential research include studies to: determine the mechanism(s) by which antioxidant(s) prevent or influence the development of diabetic vascular disease, including neurovascular and cerebrovascular disease; define interactions between oxidative pathways and free radical formation and the signaling pathways by which insulin, glucose, and other factors affect the endothelium; investigate genetic factors that may affect susceptibility by which oxidative stress and antioxidant therapies affect microvascular and macrovascular disease in diabetes; assess metabolism and tissue distribution, determine kinetics, and establish optimal dosing regimens for vitamin E or other antioxidants in patients with diabetes and/or diabetic complications; establish valid surrogate markers or clinical endpoints of diabetic complications that could be used in phase III trials of antioxidants; determine clinically meaningful, state-of-the-art measures of oxidant/antioxidant status of patients with diabetes; compare antioxidants to establish which are most likely to be efficacious in diabetic complications, or to define specific subpopulations who are most likely to benefit from antioxidant intervention; and develop new strategies to inhibit oxidation/glycoxidation and examine the effect of these strategies on microvascular or cardiovascular disease. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Paul Nichols, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2118, Bethesda, MD, 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 401-2060; e-mail: pn13w@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-112.html.

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Applications for Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke (SPOTRIAS).* The goal of the SPOTRIAS will be to reduce the disability of and mortality in stroke patients by promoting rapid diagnosis and effective intervention. The intent of the programs is to support a collaboration of clinical research from different specialties whose collective efforts will lead to new approaches for early diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke patients. Despite enormous research efforts including many clinical trials, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. The requirement for administration within 3 hours of stroke onset has proven a major obstacle to the widespread use of tPA. Dramatic improvements in stroke outcomes could be achieved by reducing the time necessary to respond to and diagnose stroke and by identifying new interventions that could be safely and promptly administered to a wider range of patients. Examples of potential research include: studies to evaluate novel stroke treatments; development and testing of innovative systems for delivery of emergency medical services; development and evaluation of clinical tools useful for rapid stroke treatment; tests of potential biomarkers, surrogate outcomes, and clinical stroke scales useful in acute stroke research; development and evaluation of new treatments and practices within critical care units for patients immediately after initial emergency department management; tests of strategies for rehabilitation of acute stroke patients; and long-term quality-of-life research for patients treated early for acute stroke. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Marler, Associate Director for Clinical Trials, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2216, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9135; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: jml37f@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-01-092.html.

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Applications Sought for Research on Zebrafish as an Animal Model

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for research studies on zebrafish as an animal model for development and disease research. This announcement is made together with 16 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).* As a vertebrate, the zebrafish is more closely related to humans than are yeast, worms, or flies. Many features of zebrafish development have been characterized, including early embryonic patterning, early development of the nervous system, and aspects of cell fate and lineage determination. The zebrafish has a number of valuable features as a model organism for the study of vertebrate development. Examples of potential areas of interest include research on neurogenesis, nervous system patterning, cell lineage, cell migration, programmed cell death, axon pathfinding and regeneration, myelination, and cognitive, motor, and sensory function. Analyses of mutants that may serve as models for neurological disorders are also encouraged. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-095.html.

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Applications for Autism Research Centers of Excellence Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) request applications for Centers of Excellence in Autism Research.* The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to establish several research centers, each of which will bring together expertise, infrastructure, and resources focused on major questions about autism. The centers will address research issues such as causes, diagnosis, early detection, prevention, and treatment, including approaches such as developmental neurobiology, genetics, and psychopharmacology. Examples of potential areas of research include: development of new or improved treatments in behavioral/psychological, pharmacological, and other biological modalities; development of methods for early diagnosis and screening, including biological and behavioral indices for early detection; investigation of neural bases and pathways for abnormal behaviors; investigation of potential environmental etiologies and risk factors including prenatal events, infections, toxic exposures, and immunizations; description and characterization of co-morbidities and how they relate to etiology, pathology, and prevention; neuroimaging investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain mapping, other new technologies to determine neuroanatomic and localized functional abnormalities and how they change over time; genetic studies including gene-environment interactions, candidate genes, and genotype-phenotype correlations; studies of language and disorders of communication; interventional, descriptive, and neuroimaging studies that utilize a related comparison group such as fragile X syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, mental retardation, tuberous sclerosis, and Williams syndrome; and development of novel animal models. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 29, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Clinical Trials Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2212, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5821; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: dh83f@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-02-001.html.

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Applications on Biomarkers for Diabetic Microvascular Complications Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the National Eye Institute (NEI) request applications for research to develop and validate biomarkers for microvascular complications of diabetes.* The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to invite basic and clinical research applications to develop biochemical, cellular, physiological, or genetic surrogate endpoints that can be used to predict risk, aid in early diagnosis, and assess progression of the microvascular complications of diabetes. The overall goal of this RFA is to develop biomarkers that could be used as diagnostic tools for patients, or as outcome measures used in clinical trials to test new therapeutic agents. Areas of potential research interest include studies to: identify and validate new biomarkers of early signs of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy, and that identify patients at risk for the development of these conditions; develop non-invasive measures of oxygenation or blood flow in relevant tissues; identify and validate new diagnostic tools that can be used to more sensitively monitor progression of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy, including studies to assess the correlation between non-invasive markers of disease and pathological progression; clarify the predictive value of existing biomarkers or surrogate endpoints; and identify biomarkers that could be useful in predicting susceptibility to or development of multiple microvascular complications. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: February 14, 2002. For more information potential applicants should contact Dr. Paul Nichols, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2118, Bethesda, MD, 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 401-2060; e-mail: pn13w@nih.gov. *For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-02-016.html.

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Applications on Cognitive Neuroimaging Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) request applications for cognitive neuroimaging research to understand the link between neuronal activity and functional imaging signals.* The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to solicit proposals that will increase the utility of functional imaging techniques in the field of cognitive neuroscience by providing greater understanding of the link between hemodynamic effects and underlying neural activity and by improving the ability of these techniques to address questions with a significant temporal component. Examples of potential areas of research include studies to: explore the relationships between synaptic activity, brain metabolic changes, vascular responses, and hemodynamic signals in cortical and subcortical regions; establish a quantitative link between neuronal responses and fMRI signals-relationships of hemodynamic signal to neuronal firing rates and neuronal subthreshold activity; address the issue of spatial homogeneity, sensitivity and variability due to region-specific vasculature and neuronal packaging; couple the MRI technique with other modes of investigation that would directly rule out alternative sources of signal change; combine the techniques of functional neuroimaging with in-vivo single unit electrophysiology or microdialysis in nonhuman primates; demonstrate direct coupling between electrical activity (EEG-MEG) and hemodynamic signals (MRI-optical signal); develop and validate regionally specific computational models of electrical activity and hemodynamic metabolism in nonhuman primates or other relevant animal models; and develop and adapt novel experimental designs employing existing functional imaging techniques in humans to nonhuman primate or other relevant models for the purpose of extending these protocols to studies linking neuronal activity to hemodynamic signal to specifically address the issue of the dynamics of cognitive function. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 28, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Emmeline Edwards, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2109, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ee48r@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-009.html.

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Applications on Deep Brain Stimulation Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request applications for research on the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation (DBS).* The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to seek applications that will expand the consortium and strengthen the research effort in the area of mechanisms of action of DBS. Areas of potential research include: studies to further refine the understanding of the functional organization of basal ganglia and other parts of the motor control network and their role in the regulation of behaviors, such as voluntary movement; studies of the stimulatory and/or inhibitory effects of DBS on specific pathways, fibers of passage, and cell bodies in subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus (GPi); preclinical studies in a suitable animal model to test the possibility that intervention with DBS in the early phase of Parkinson's disease (PD) modifies the progression of the disease; studies of the acute and long-term effects of DBS on the motor activity patterns in areas of the motor system that do not receive direct stimulation; parametric studies in a suitable model of the effects of stimulation parameters or stimulation location on the symptoms of PD; studies of the effect of DBS on gene expression and synaptic plasticity in areas of the motor system that do not receive direct stimulation; development of improved animal models showing progressive degeneration that allow the study of the physiology of brain stimulation in the normal and diseased or injured brain and the changes chronic stimulation evokes; and studies in a suitable animal model of the effect of DBS on non-motor symptoms of PD. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 20, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: heet@nih.gov; or Dr. Eugene Oliver, Program Director, Neurodegeneration Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2203, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5680; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: eo11c@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-003.html.

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Research on the Effects of Hypoglycemia on Neuronal and Glial Cell Function Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International request applications for research on the effects of hypoglycemia on the function of neuronal and glial cells of the developing and mature central nervous system.* The purposes of this request for applications (RFA) are to solicit basic studies to define the effect of varying glycemic levels on cerebral metabolism, transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier, and astrocytic regulation of substrates for neuronal metabolism, and to determine pathological consequences of acute and recurrent hypoglycemic insult on cells of the central nervous system. Examples of potential areas of research include studies to: evaluate the role of glial-derived alternative fuels in the maintenance of neuronal and glial function; examine cellular physiological alterations in response to hypoglycemia; determine the role of astrocytic glycogen in maintaining neuronal function and survival during hypoglycemia; elucidate the effects of hypoglycemia on mechanisms regulating astrocytic uptake of glutamate; assess the extent and mechanism of CNS damage during acute or recurrent hypoglycemia, and to determine whether sensitivity to hypoglycemia varies with age; and determine whether there is a therapeutic window during which hypoglycemia-induced CNS damage can be ameliorated or reversed. Also encouraged are studies on the relationship between the astrocyte pentose phosphate pathway, oxidative stress, and brain injury during glucose deprivation; interactions between astrocytes and other cell types such as oligodendrocytes and their relationship to brain injury during hypoglycemia; and potential agents that could be used to mitigate hypoglycemia-induced neuronal damage. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: March 15, 2002. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Toby Behar, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2114A, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 480-2424; e-mail: tb72z@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-008.html.

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Applications for Gene Therapy for Neurological Disorders Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) request applications for research on gene therapy for neurological disorders.* Gene therapy holds tremendous promise for the treatment of neurological disorders. Despite recent advances in this area, however, certain scientific, technological, and safety goals must be achieved before gene transfer becomes a viable therapeutic alternative. The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to accelerate the translation of gene transfer methodologies into clinical practice. Examples of potential areas of research include: development of improved inducible vectors that permit effective temporal control over transgene expression; design of vectors with regulatory elements that permit gene expression to be targeted to specific brain regions, peripheral neural tissues, or other cell types of therapeutic interest; development of methods that achieve higher transduction efficiencies and high-level, stable transgene expression in the nervous system; development of techniques that permit improved focal or global delivery of vectors into the brain or peripheral neural tissues; and development of improved methods for monitoring transgene expression in the brain. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 16, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2143, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5745; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: finkelsr@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-007.html.

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Applications for New Approaches to Prevent Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International request applications for new approaches to prevent hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes.* The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to define and characterize hypoglycemia in people with diabetes, and to develop new approaches to prevent the development of hypoglycemia and improve its effects in people with diabetes. Examples of potential areas of research include studies to: determine the prevalence of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes, with a focus on delineating differences among various age groups (e.g., children, adults, and elderly adults); delineate the role of age, gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and other factors on the risk of hypoglycemia; identify factors, including method of treatment, exercise, nutrition, or duration of diabetes, which affect risk of hypoglycemia; establish normative data for blood glucose levels, particularly in children, throughout a 24-hour period; determine whether there are changes in counter-regulatory mechanisms with age; determine whether intensive glucose control during pregnancy has adverse effects on the developing fetus; determine whether alternative fuels (e.g., ketones) can provide a buffer against hypoglycemia; assess the reliability and utility of continuous glucose sensors in detecting falling blood glucose levels and in preventing severe hypoglycemia; determine whether the occurrence of hypoglycemia can be minimized by altering the timing of drug delivery or by drugs with altered kinetics; determine whether different treatment regimens for diabetes affect counter-regulatory mechanisms; evaluate whether there are differences in counter-regulation between individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes; and develop and test strategies for minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia with intensive glucose management. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 21, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Toby Behar, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2114A, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 480-2424; e-mail: tb72z@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-01-032.html.

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Applications on Hypoglycemia Unawareness Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International request applications for research to address the problem of hypoglycemia unawareness in people with diabetes.* The objectives of this request for applications (RFA) are to define the mechanisms underlying the loss of hypoglycemia awareness in patients with diabetes, and to develop novel approaches to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia unawareness. Potential areas of research include studies to: elucidate the identity, location, and functional characteristics of glucose-sensing neurons, and determine whether these characteristics are altered by recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia; identify the neuronal populations involved in generating hypoglycemic awareness, and the potential effects of recurrent hypoglycemia upon these neural systems; identify the neuroendocrine or biochemical signals generated by hypoglycemia, and the changes in these signals over recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia; determine whether altered glucose transport may play a role in hypoglycemia unawareness; explore the effect of sleep on counter-regulatory responses, and determine the role of nighttime hypoglycemia in loss of awareness; delineate the role of age, gender, or race/ethnicity in the development of hypoglycemia unawareness; assess the extent to which uncontrolled hyperglycemia may impair neuronal function and contribute to hypoglycemia unawareness; and develop and test strategies for promoting glucose sensing by the brain. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 21, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Toby Behar, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2114A, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 480-2424; e-mail: tb72z@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-01-031.html.

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Applications for Parkinson's Disease Neuroprotection Clinical Trial (Clinical Centers) Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for clinical centers to collaborate on a large, double-blind randomized trial of two or more potential neuroprotective agents in patients early in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD).* The intent of this request for applications (RFA) is to solicit applications from qualified investigators proposing to serve as clinical centers in order to conduct a large, collaborative randomized double-blind trial testing neuroprotective agents in patients with early PD. A clinical center is an institution that is actively involved with the recruitment, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of study participants. It will consist of a team of researchers with the neurological skills to apply diagnostic criteria for PD and criteria for study selection, and to deliver medical care to PD patients. Optimally, the team will also have experience in collaborative clinical studies. The center(s) may have agreements with other nearby institutions to recruit and treat patients for this study. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 15, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Bernard Ravina, Program Director, Clinical Trials Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2225, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9135; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: ravinab@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-010.html.

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Applications for Research on Research Integrity Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and the Office of Research Integrity request applications for research on research integrity.* The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to address the need for more and better information on the factors that encourage and/or discourage integrity in publicly funded research. Examples of potential research areas of interest include: research norms and/or practices; institutional climate and responsibility; education on the responsible conduct of research; mentor/trainee relationships; data acquisition, management, sharing, and ownership; responsible authorship; integrity of publication practices and the research record; research collaborations and issues that may arise from such collaborations; conflict of interest; and the meaning of research misconduct and the regulations, policies, and guidelines that govern research misconduct in PHS-funded institutions. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 19, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Mary Ellen Michel, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2209, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: mm108w@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-005.html.

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Applications for Technology Development for Safe and Effective Deep Brain Stimulation Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and the Office of Research Integrity request applications for research on research integrity.* The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to address the need for more and better information on the factors that encourage and/or discourage integrity in publicly funded research. Examples of potential research areas of interest include: research norms and/or practices; institutional climate and responsibility; education on the responsible conduct of research; mentor/trainee relationships; data acquisition, management, sharing, and ownership; responsible authorship; integrity of publication practices and the research record; research collaborations and issues that may arise from such collaborations; conflict of interest; and the meaning of research misconduct and the regulations, policies, and guidelines that govern research misconduct in PHS-funded institutions. APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: November 19, 2001. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Mary Ellen Michel, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2209, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: mm108w@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-005.html.

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Patients with Menkes Disease Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with Menkes disease-a genetic disorder affecting the metabolism of copper-for a study of early copper histidine therapy. In the study, researchers will evaluate the effects of early copper histidine in patients with Menkes disease, and correlate specific molecular defects with responses to treatment. Eligible patients must be diagnosed at or shortly after birth as having Menkes disease. The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Stephen Kaler, NINDS, NIH, Building 31, Room 1B-03, 31 Center Drive MSC 2082, Bethesda, MD 20892-2082; telephone: (301) 496-8368; fax: (301) 402-1073; email: sgk@box-s.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking individuals with spasmodic dysphonia to participate a study to improve understanding of the disorder's pathophysiology, and to evaluate the role of laryngeal sensation in symptom generation. Eligible participants must be between 18 and 70 years of age, and have spasmodic dysphonia or muscular tension dysphonia. Participants should be without a history of cardiac problems, asthma, or pulmonary disease and should not be currently receiving treatment for their voice disorder. The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Christy Ludlow, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D38, 10 Center Drive MSC 1416, Bethesda, MD 20892-1416; telephone: (301) 496-9366; fax: (301) 480-0803; email ludlowc@ninds.nih.gov.

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Children with Stroke, Cerebral Palsy, and Porencephaly Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking children with stroke, cerebral palsy, and porencephaly for a study of abnormal acquired and genetic coagulation factors. In the study, researchers will measure a series of potential risk factors for stroke that include autoimmune, inflammatory, and genetic clotting factor abnormalities. By identifying the factors that contribute to childhood stroke, cerebral palsy, and porencephaly, researchers hope this study will lay the groundwork for future research projects that will explore potential treatments. Eligible patients must have a history of porencephaly, cerebral infarction (stroke), and/or cerebral palsy and have a diagnosis of porencephaly or stroke confirmed by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and/or Doppler ultrasonography. The study consists of a 30-minute telephone interview/questionnaire, blood sample, and buccal smear. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The study will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Dr. Karin Nelson or Dr. John Lynch, NINDS, NIH, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 5S220, Bethesda, MD 20892-1447; telephone: (301) 496-1714; fax: (301) 496-2358; email: lynchj@ninds.nih.gov.

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