Skip secondary menu

Funding News - NINDS Notes - June 2004


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Research on Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on autism and autism spectrum disorders. This announcement is made together with 5 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Autism and autism spectrum disorders (which consist of five disorders: autistic disorder, Rett's disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, Asperger's disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified) are complex disorders that are generally life-long, and affect multiple aspects of development, learning, and adaptation in the community. The causes of these disorders are poorly understood, but may include genetic, metabolic, immunologic, or infectious or other environmental influences.

Potential areas of research interest include: epidemiology, screening, early identification and diagnosis, genetic studies, brain mechanisms, communication skills, pharmacogenomic studies, cognitive neuroscience, psychosocial (behavioral) interventions, pharmacological and other biological interventions, and support and rehabilitative services across the lifespan--including adulthood and the transition to adulthood.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Clinical Trials Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2212, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5821; fax: 301-480-1080; e-mail: dh83f@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-085.html.

Top  This Item Only



High Throughput Tools for Brain and Behavior Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invite Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications to develop high throughput data acquisition and analysis tools to aid basic behavioral science or neuroscience research.*

Many of the common technologies used in neuroscience and behavioral science research require extensive time, labor, and cost for acquiring and analyzing data. There is a strong need to develop tools to make data collection and analysis more efficient, without compromising competency.

Applications considered appropriate for this announcement include those proposing research and development of tools for high throughput measures at any level (or combination of levels) of analysis--from molecules through behavior, including social behavior. The tools should be aimed at rapid acquisition and analysis of data useful to understanding the brain and behavior. The tools must be relevant to neuroscience and/or behavioral science appropriate to the missions of NINDS and NIMH.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Emmeline Edwards, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2109, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-9964; fax: 301-402-2060; e-mail: ee48r@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-086.html.

Top  This Item Only



Research on Neurovascular Mechanisms of Brain Function and Disease Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) encourage grant applications for research on the integration of neurobiological and cerebrovascular mechanisms in the adult, aged, and pediatric brain in health and disease.*

This announcement encourages studies focused on improving the understanding of the dynamic interactions within the neurovascular unit (NVU)--a construct consisting of brain microvascular endothelium, glia, neurons, and the extracellular matrix that maintains spatial relations among them. Knowledge of these interactions may stimulate new strategies for basic, translational, and clinical research on many neurological disorders, including stroke, vascular dementia, and intracerebral hemorrhage.

Potential areas of research interest include studies to: develop and characterize in vivo and in vitro models that reflect the unique features of neurovascular communication in the brain under normal, aging, and disease conditions; examine the genes and proteins that are uniquely expressed by the NVU and mechanisms by which brain cells regulate endothelial cell gene expression and vise versa; identify pattern-specific gene and protein expression within the NVU to provide a platform for further investigations on integrating brain-vascular biology as it pertains to conditions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, antigen presentation, metastasis, and local inflammation; explore the genesis and regulation of the NVU, its stem cell origins, and the interactions of microvessel networks in the regions of the central nervous system with developing neurons and in areas of adult neurogenesis; identify signal transduction pathways of brain and capillary endothelial cells in the regulation of the extracellular matrix under normal and disease conditions; identify regional diversity of NVU properties within the brain and the microvasculature throughout the lifespan; identify changes in NVU integrative functions in vivo and/or in situ using imaging approaches; explore the cell-cell interactions among the cellular and matrix elements of the NVU; and examine the plasticity of the NVU and the changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling throughout the lifespan.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas P. Jacobs, Program Director, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2112, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1431; fax: 301-480-2424; e-mail: jacobst@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-04-072.html.

Top  This Item Only



New Technology for Proteomics and Glycomics Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) encourage Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications to develop new technology for proteomics and glycomics.*

Proteomics and the subdiscipline of glycomics are rapidly developing, technology-intensive fields. However, technologies and methods in these fields remain largely inadequate to address the majority of meaningful biological problems, particularly with respect to quantitative and real time measurements. Continued intensive development of advanced tools is essential.

Potential areas of research interest include: identification of individual proteins; recognition of protein interactions; relative quantitation to distinguish differential expression of proteins; characterization of post-translational modifications; and qualitative or quantitative measurements at high spatial and/or temporal resolution to address the dynamics of protein interactions. One area of particular interest is the development of technologies that will permit quantitative and real-time observations, whether for clinical studies or experimental systems. Especially encouraged are applications that address the unique needs of glycomics and clinical proteomics. Informatics tools are needed for data handling and reduction, correlation of carbohydrate and protein information, and a variety of other purposes.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Danilo Tagle, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2133, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5745; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: tagled@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-089.html.

Top  This Item Only



Novel Technologies for In Vivo Imaging Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) invite Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications to develop novel technologies for in vivo imaging.*

Significant advances in medical imaging technologies made in the past 25 years largely have focused on structural or anatomical imaging at the organ or tissue level. Now there is an opportunity to develop and integrate novel imaging technologies that exploit current knowledge of the genetic and molecular bases of various diseases. Molecular biological discoveries have great implications for prevention, detection, and targeted therapy.

Potential topics of research interest include: early disease detection; disease screening; imaging for diagnosis, staging, or monitoring the effects of therapy; image-guided biopsy, therapy, and interventional procedures; copies of prototypes imaging systems; and research resources, including development of software and related informatics methods that assist in more efficient delivery of imaging technologies for screening, diagnosis, and treatment for cancer and other diseases.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Director, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2131, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: dc342b@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-094.html.

Top  This Item Only



Research Partnerships for Improving Functional Outcomes Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for Research Partnerships for Improving Functional Outcomes for basic, applied, and translational multidisciplinary research on problems related to rehabilitation or health maintenance of individuals with acute or chronic disease. This announcement is made together with 8 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

A "partnership" is a multidisciplinary research team that applies an integrative systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to improve function, promote health, and increase participation in community life. An increasing proportion of the nation's healthcare expenses is devoted to the care of individuals with chronic diseases and disorders, many of whom experience significant declines in their abilities to perform activities of daily living and to participate in community life. Effective rehabilitation solutions for these individuals may significantly improve the nation's use of increasingly constrained healthcare resources.

Examples of areas of research interest include studies to: develop and test the efficacy of symptom-focused or holistic/integrated therapies for high prevalence conditions that cause disability, including low back pain, stroke, hearing loss, visual loss, and congestive heart failure; determine the extent to which genetic, environmental, social, and psychological factors determine patient responses to specific rehabilitative interventions; investigate the processes, at a molecular level, that lead to formation of muscle and skin contractures that occur due to inactivity and chronic disease; define the optimal setting(s) and timing of rehabilitation strategies, optimal pain protocols, the role of passive range of motion, and the most cost-effective follow-up for patients undergoing hip and knee replacement surgeries; develop algorithms that can be used to match available interventions and technologies to individual patients to optimize functional outcomes; develop and evaluate defined rehabilitation interventions based upon detailed biomechanical analyses of the patterns of muscle activation in specific conditions; and test methods to promote the dissemination of evidence-based rehabilitative therapies and technologies from the laboratory or clinic to community environments.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Director, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2131, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: dc342b@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-04-077.html.

Top  This Item Only



Research on Understanding and Preventing Brain Tumor Dispersal Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) invite grant applications for research to understand and prevent brain tumor dispersal.*

Many brain tumors are highly invasive and, therefore, extremely difficult to treat. Cells from the primary tumor often infiltrate surrounding brain tissues, so that removal of the main tumor mass is not sufficient to prevent recurrence. The goal of this program announcement is to promote studies that: identify the properties of brain tumor cells that cause them to migrate; determine how interaction of tumor cells with normal brain elements affects migration; and translate understanding of these parameters into interventions that target invading tumor cells.

Potential areas of research interest include studies to: analyze candidate genes and signal transduction pathways that control brain tumor cell dispersal, and molecular and cellular mechanisms that control normal brain cell migration and potentially regulate the dispersal of brain tumor cells; determine the cells of origin and specific properties of migrating brain tumor cells; analyze the interactions of brain tumor cells with normal brain elements that may contribute to understanding tumor dispersal; study extracellular matrix properties that potentially control normal and aberrant migration of cells in the central nervous system; determine what causes brain tumor cells to exit the cell cycle during migration and reenter it during subsequent cell proliferation; study neural progenitor cell biology that may shed light on brain tumor dispersal; investigate why invading brain tumor cells are resistant to chemotherapy or radiation; establish novel in vitro and in vivo migration assays that can be used to elucidate mechanisms of brain tumor cell dispersal; develop novel methodologies that permit more effective visualization of migrating brain tumor cells; and develop therapeutic interventions that target migrating brain tumor cells and prevent them from forming new tumors.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2143, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5745; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-04-079.html.

Top  This Item Only




Applications to Establish Microarray Centers for Research on the Nervous System Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request grant applications to establish microarray centers for research on the nervous system.*

Oligonucleotide and cDNA microarrays are used to make quantitative or relative measurements of gene expression. The microarrays contain nucleotide sequences corresponding to known genes or expressed sequence tags. A single array can contain thousands of genes, which may represent a significant subset of the genes, or even the entire genome, of an organism. A comparison of cells or tissues from experimental and control preparations provides data on differences in expression levels between the two conditions. Changes in gene expression and expression patterns may reveal clues to underlying, widespread alterations of cellular physiology and/or provide information on developmental or disease processes. Changes in one or a few genes might lead to the discovery of individual molecular targets for drug therapy.

The goal of this request for applications (RFA) is to establish up to three microarray centers that will work together as a consortium, providing NINDS-funded and NIMH-funded investigators with a broad spectrum of services to support microarray analyses on the nervous system. The services will include: providing commercial arrays; producing arrays for use by the neuroscience community; performing array experiments, including hybridization reactions, array reading, and data analyses; and advising and training the neuroscience community, including assisting with experimental design, advising on how best to obtain experimental results, and training neuroscientists on the effective use of microarray experimental techniques, in an effort to disseminate expertise throughout the neuroscience community. The services provided by the centers will be on a fee-for-service basis.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: August 9, 2004

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Director, Technology Development Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1779; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-05-002.html.

Top  This Item Only



Applications to Establish Molecular Libraries Screening Centers Network Requested

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) requests grant applications to establish a molecular libraries screening centers network.*

This request for applications (RFA) is an NIH Roadmap Initiative. The NIH Roadmap is an innovative approach to accelerate fundamental discovery and translate that knowledge into effective prevention strategies and new treatments. All NIH institutes and centers participate in Roadmap Initiatives.*

The molecular libraries screening centers network will be a national resource capable of providing innovative high throughput molecular screening approaches to identify small organic molecules (compounds) that are active in biological assays, and synthetic chemistry to improve the use of these molecules as bioactive probes for in vitro, and potentially in vivo, studies of normal and abnormal physiology of cells, organs, model systems, and/or organisms. The primary objective of this screening effort is to identify compounds that will constitute a new set of research tools for both public and private sector scientists to use. In addition, some of these compounds may be used by scientists as chemical platforms that may lead to new therapeutics.

Potential areas of research interest include: discovery of novel biological targets that can inform studies of cell function and disease pathophysiology; discovery, validation, and application of assays (screens) and disease models to evaluate the activity of novel small molecules; and use of chemical genomic approaches to characterize the biology of genes of interest, cellular processes, and proteins associated with disease processes.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: August 24, 2004

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Linda Brady, Project Team Leader, Molecular Libraries Screening Centers Network, NIMH, Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 7185, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-443-5288; fax: 301-402-4740;
e-mail: lbrady@mail.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-04-017.html. For more information on the NIH Roadmap, please visit the website at: http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/.

Top  This Item Only



Applications to Establish Senator Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative Research Centers Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) request applications to establish Senator Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative Research Centers to increase basic and clinical research on all forms of muscular dystrophy.

Muscular dystrophies--a group of diseases characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of muscles--collectively have a high impact on health, affecting tens of thousands of people in the United States alone. Although recent research has revealed much about genetic defects associated with many forms of muscular dystrophy, treatment for the diseases has not changed significantly. There is a need to learn more about pathogenesis of the diseases and to improve early detection and screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Examples of areas of research interest include studies to: clarify the role of inflammatory changes that accompany tissue degeneration; explore the relationship between vascular changes and pathogenesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle; develop improved outcome measures and methods to monitor changes due to treatment or disease progression; expand the use of non-invasive techniques, including imaging, to determine changes in muscle properties during disease progression and treatment; define molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the cardiovascular disease associated with muscular dystrophies; pursue the development and sharing of appropriate animal models for muscular dystrophies; improve treatments to prevent and reverse muscle weakness and wasting; explore methods to prevent respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy; determine if stem cells can be delivered through the circulatory system efficiently and effectively; promote bioengineering and other innovative research into rehabilitation of patients with muscular dystrophies; develop disease-specific measurements for quality of life; and encourage research on the psychosocial, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of muscular dystrophy, including mental health concerns of affected persons and families.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: August 26, 2004

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Director, Channels, Synapses and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2131, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: dc342b@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this request for applications, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AR-04-008.html.

Top  This Item Only




Patients with Cervical or Focal Hand Dystonia Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek people with cervical or focal hand dystonia who are receiving botulinum toxin injections for a study of a medication called amlodipine. This research study will examine whether amlodipine can improve the effect of botulinum toxin injections for dystonia, which causes abnormal postures and disrupted movements.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Barbara Karp, Office of the Clinical Director, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5S209, 10 Center Drive MSC 1428, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428; telephone: 301-496-0150; fax: 301-480-2973. Please refer to study number 01-N-147.

Top  This Item Only



Persons with Dysphagia Sought for Research Studies

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking persons with dysphagia to participate in research studies to determine the feasibility of using hyolaryngeal muscle stimulation to prevent aspiration during swallowing. This protocol will include individuals who have chronic pharyngeal dysphagia and have been instructed not to take food by mouth or are on a restricted diet. The outcome of this study will be relevant to future use of neuromuscular stimulation for laryngeal elevation in patients with pharyngeal dysphagia.

Individuals may qualify if they are 18-80 years of age, have intact cognition and hearing for communication, and have had chronic pharyngeal dysphagia for more than six months, penetration or aspiration of foods or liquids, or coughing.

The study involvesone three-day inpatient visit to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. The studies will be carried out under testing and safety standards of the Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, interested persons may contact Ianessa Humbert, 10 Center Drive MSC 1416, Building 10, Room 5D38, Bethesda, MD 20892-1416; telephone: (301) 402-1109; e-mail: humberti@ninds.nih.gov.

Top  This Item Only