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Funding News - NINDS Notes - June 2001


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:



Research on the Biology of Non-Human Stem Cells Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) encourage grant applications for research on the biology of non-human stem cells in the central nervous system (CNS).

One of the most exciting frontiers in medicine is the potential of stem cells for treating congenital and degenerative disorders. In the CNS, cell replacement is of particular interest because, unlike other tissues, the mature brain and spinal cord have little capacity for self-repair. CNS neurons are very restricted in their ability to regrow in situ, and the adult brain appears to have a limited ability to produce new neurons. Recent reports of multipotent stem cells that are able to generate cells with neuronal properties have raised expectations that some stem cells may be able to replace lost neurons and glia, repair defective circuits, and restore functions compromised by age, physical damage, or disease.

Potential areas of research interest include studies to: compare the mitotic potential and fates of different types of neural and non-neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo; compare the functional properties of neural precursor cells implanted at different stages of differentiation; characterize the migratory properties of stem cells in the developing, adult, or aging nervous system; investigate the ability of progenitor cells to revert to a more plastic, multipotent state; examine changes in gene and protein expression as stem and progenitor cells differentiate along specific lineages; compare the efficacy and risks of different modes of cell delivery in large and small mammals, and in animals of different ages; assess the ability of transplanted cells to integrate with the host nervous system and modify dysfunctional states; and develop novel techniques, such as non-invasive methods, to tract the integration and/or function of transplanted cells.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Arlene Chiu, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: chiua@ninds.nih.gov

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-078.html.

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Applications for Research on Child Neglect Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), along with 10 other components of the Federal Government,* invites grant applications for research on child neglect.

While much attention is paid to the issue of child abuse, little research has addressed the equally significant problem of child neglect. Yet, child neglect can have profound health consequences, including premature birth and perinatal complications, physical injuries (such as central nervous system and craniofacial injuries, fractures, and severe burns), disfigurement, disabilities, and mental and behavioral problems. Child neglect is a serious health, justice, social services, and education problem; therefore more research is needed to augment and expand existing scientific knowledge of this issue.

Potential areas for research include studies of: the antecedents of neglect including individual and social risk factors of neglect, and cultural, social, religious, or ethnic differences in causes, patterns, and contexts of neglect; the consequences of neglect including the educational consequences, the impact of the socio-emotional behavior of children and youth, the impact of neglect on short- and long-term health outcomes, prenatal and postnatal influences on the developing brain, and long-term neurobiological sequelae/morbidity of neglect; the processes and mediators accounting for or influencing the effects of neglect; the treatment, preventive intervention, and service delivery for neglected children; the issues related to specific neglect populations and their caretakers; and the effect of non-residential, parental involvement as either a causative or preventive factor in neglect.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2212, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5821; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: dh83f@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting Federal Government components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-060.html.

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Research on the Development of Zebrafish Mutagenesis and Screening Tools Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages, along with 16 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),* grant applications for research on the development of zebrafish mutagenesis and screening tools.

Mutational analyses in the non-vertebrate genetic models of the worm and the fruit fly have contributed significantly to the understanding of early developmental pathways. While the invertebrate systems have revealed much useful information, many features of patterning and morphogenesis of the vertebrate embryo are distinct, and, thus, cannot be studied using invertebrates. As a vertebrate, the zebrafish is more closely related to humans than are yeast, worms, or flies, and has a number of advantageous features as a model organism for study of vertebrate development, disease, and biological pathways.

Examples of potential research include: development and/or application of novel phenotypic screens for mutants, and methods of mutagenesis; genetic screens focusing on identifying mutations that affect the structure and function of specific tissue/organ systems, and novel developmental genes and pathways, including those mediating sensitivity or resistance to environmental teratogens; screens to analyze the genetic basis of adult phenotypes including behavior, aging, organ disease, cancer, and responses to environmental toxins, alcohol, and drugs; screens to detect altered gene expression patterns, as a tool to identify components of genetic pathways or those altered by environmental agents; and sensitized screens, using strains carrying a known mutation, in order to identify extragenic suppressors or enhancers of that mutation.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-070.html.

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Applications for Research on HIV Pathogenesis in Women Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites, along with 7 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),* applications for research studies on HIV pathogenesis in women using the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).

HIV infection in women is increasing globally. Last year, women accounted for more than 45 percent of the approximately 36 million people estimated to be living with AIDS worldwide. Marked gender differences may exist in HIV disease progression, response to antiretroviral therapy, and complications of therapy. Furthermore, women with HIV/AIDS suffer from a variety of conditions unique to women. Studies of HIV/AIDS in women can play an important role in testing new biological or sociobehavioral hypotheses at the population level, and in linking basic science findings and laboratory methods to epidemiologically well-defined populations and communities. WIHS-a multicenter, prospective study-was established in 1993 to carry out comprehensive investigations of the impact of HIV infection in women.

Examples of potential areas of research include studies on: the pathogenesis of central and peripheral nervous system abnormalities caused directly or indirectly by HIV infection in HIV-positive women; the role of genetic factors, immune status, and hormonal function in women at risk for AIDS-related neurological disorders; the molecular basis of HIV infection and disease progression in women in the antiretroviral era; endocrinological factors, HIV expression, and disease progression; interactions between pregnancy and HIV infection; fertility-related behaviors among HIV-seropositive women; direct and indirect effects of drug use and associated infection co-morbidities; and the in vivo role and mechanism of action of oral antiviral factors.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-084.html.

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Research on HIV-1 Infection of the Central Nervous System Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) invite grant applications for basic and clinical research on HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS).

During the last 15 years research on HIV-1 infection has significantly improved understanding of the neurological and neuropsychiatric complications associated with AIDS. However, there are many fundamental gaps in the knowledge of HIV-1 entry into the brain, establishment of viral reservoirs, and reseeding of systemic compartments. These issues are particularly relevant since potent anti-retroviral therapy does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier and may not be effective in eliminating CNS reservoirs. Drug-resistant viral reservoirs in the CNS may be important not only in reseeding of systemic compartments, but also may contribute to the worsening of neurological disease in long-term AIDS survivors. Therefore it is essential to develop an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of HIV infection of the brain using novel approaches and technologies.

Potential areas of research interest include studies on: the establishment of CNS viral reservoirs; reseeding of the peripheral compartment from the CNS; the role of CNS viral load in contributing to neurological and neuropsychiatric dysfunction; HIV-induced CNS degeneration and dysfunction using novel imaging techniques; development of HIV-1 therapeutic agents capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier; the co-modulation of neural processes and related biological systems by HIV-1 and other neurotoxins; and the role of opportunistic infections in neurobehavioral and neurological complications of HIV infection.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-072.html.

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Novel Approaches to Enhance Animal Stem Cell Research Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites, along with 9 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),* applications on novel approaches to enhance animal stem cell research.

Embryonic and other stem cells are valuable biomedical research models for the study of biological and disease processes and for the creation of disease models. Stem cells hold tremendous promise as model systems for development of therapeutics and development of replacement tissues. Thus far, embryonic stem cells have been isolated from several biomedically important nonhuman research models. However, research is needed to provide for a full array of totipotent and multipotent stem cells from nonhuman biomedical research animal models, as well as to provide the research tools to identify, characterize, and purify those cells.

Areas of potential research interest include studies to: expand the number of nonhuman animal model systems in which embryonic stem cells are available; identify, isolate, culture, and characterize multipotent stem cell populations derived from nonhuman embryonic stem cells, and from post-fetal tissue types; generate and use panels of markers for stem cell attributes common across species for use in characterization of stem cells in a range of animal species or tissues; and create universal methods of culture to maintain the undifferentiated state of embryonic or other characterized, multipotent stem cells across nonhuman animal species.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Arlene Chiu, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: chiua@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-076.html.

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Research on Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invite grant applications for research on restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD).

RLS is a common neurological disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations of the legs and an urge to move them for relief. Because symptoms are intensified by inactivity and lying down, individuals with RLS often have difficulty falling and staying asleep. An estimated 80 percent of individuals with RLS also have a condition called PLMD, which is characterized by repetitive stereotyped movements of the limbs-primarily the legs-during sleep.

Areas of potential research interest include: studies to distinguish genetic and non-genetic forms and to map, identify, and characterize genes involved in the etiology of RLS and PLMD; epidemiological studies to determine the incidence and prevalence of RLS and PLMD in population as a function of sex, age, and/or ethnic group; development of genetic models of RLS and PLMD in both small and large animals; studies in animals exposed to precipitants of RLS and PLMD; studies to determine how dopamine pathways are altered in RLS and PLMD; identification of biological markers that could be used in diagnostic or treatment studies; studies of the effect of movement on sensory symptoms of RLS; studies of the relationship between RLS and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity; dosage studies of the treatments currently used for RLS and PLMD; and studies of previously unexplored treatments for RLS and PLMD.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Paul Nichols, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2108, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-9964; fax: (301) 402-2060; email: pn13w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-086.html.

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Research on Strategies for Germ-line Modifications in the Rat Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages, along with 6 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH),* grant applications for research on strategies for germ-line modifications in the rat.

Rats are widely used as scientific models of human physiology because of several unique characteristics including size, extensive phenotype data, and relevance to many aspects of human biology. They also provide very important and useful models in the areas of neurobehavior and addiction, and human arthritis and related autoimmune diseases. Because of the significant use of rat models in cardiovascular biology, renal and pulmonary disease, reproduction, neurobiology, immunology, cancer, diabetes, arthritis and autoimmune disease, and endocrinology, the ability to manipulate the rat genome is important.

Potential areas of research include: strategies for culturing pluripotent rat embryonic stem cells to allow genetic manipulation and to create rats with germ-line transmission of genetic modifications; development of alternative technologies to create null mutations or gene placement in the rat; development of cost-effective nuclear transfer procedures in the rat; studies that demonstrate mutation transfer to rat stem cells or other cells for transfer into embryos or germ cells; and methods for targeting engineered introns into rat chromosomal DNA to support the study of gene function.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATES: October 1, 2001; October 1, 2002; and October 1, 2003.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Arlene Chiu, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: chiua@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-01-077.html.

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Applications for Autism Centers of Excellence Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) request applications for developmental grants for autism centers of excellence.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to support early and mid-stage development of interdisciplinary teams of investigators focused on basic and clinical issues related to autism.

This RFA is intended to increase the number and quality of teams and/or sites fully prepared to organize the scientific resources and infrastructure necessary to generate outstanding applications for Centers of Excellence for Autism Research. Support from this RFA will give the teams an opportunity to define common goals and objectives, prove the feasibility of their working as cohesive, interactive research teams, and aid in the acquisition of resources, equipment, or administrative support needed to operate interdisciplinary centers. This type of multidisciplinary, multi-faceted research is important for better understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of autism.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 12, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2212, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5821; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: dh83f@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-01-013.html.

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Applications on Gene Discovery for Neurological and Neurobehavioral Disorders Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request applications for research studies on gene discovery for neurological and neurobehavioral disorders.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to promote the identification of genes that cause or contribute to human neurological and neurobehavioral diseases. This RFA is intended to encourage applications for genetics research projects with objectives such as identifying the gene or genes that produce disease susceptibility, identifying “modifier” genes that affect disease susceptibility or outcome, and/or investigating the relationship between genotype and disease phenotype.

Areas of potential research include: traditional linkage analysis; sib-pair and affected-pedigree-member methods; case-control or family-based association studies; linkage disequilibrium mapping in genetically isolated populations; candidate gene analysis; cytogenetic studies to identify chromosomal abnormalities associated with a disorder; and positional cloning techniques.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 10, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-002.html.

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Applications for Parkinson’s Disease Research Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Disease Research, the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation/National Parkinson’s Foundation, and the Parkinson’s Alliance request applications for fast-track (R21) grants for research on Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder caused by selective degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra-a brain area critical for purposeful control of movement. The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to stimulate novel, innovative, or high-impact research on the cure, cause, prevention, and/or improved treatment of Parkinson’s disease and its complications.

Areas of potential research interest include epidemiology, genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and clinical studies. An important component of disease cure or prevention is the translation of basic discoveries to clinical applications, therefore studies utilizing translational or “bench-to-beside” approaches are encouraged. Collaborative efforts between basic neurobiologists and clinicians also are welcomed.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 19, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Diane Murphy, Program Director, Neurodegeneration Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2223, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5680; fax: (301) 480-1080; e-mail: murphyd@ninds.nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-006.html.

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