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Funding News - NINDS Notes - June 2000


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



NINDS Seeks Applications for Bioengineering Nanotechnology Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), the National Eye Institute (NEI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) invite applications for small business innovation research (SBIR) projects on nanotechnologies useful to biomedicine.

Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter at the scale of 1 to 100 nanometers, and the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. It is emerging as a field critical for enabling essential breakthroughs that may have tremendous biomedical potential.

Examples of potential research areas include studies on: nanoplumbing components such as valves, microfluidic channels, and motors; logic circuits based on quantum dots; development and improvement of techniques based on new principles for probing biological properties and phenomena not well understood at the nanometer scale and for characterizing nanoscale materials; development of fluorescent probes at the nanometer scale for monitoring biochemical processes on the surface and inside a cell in health and disease; creation of "smart" nanostructured biocompatible materials; development of nanofabricated barriers to prevent rejection of implantable materials; development of nanoparticles and nanospheres that enable controlled release of therapeutic agents, antibodies, genes, and vaccines into targeted cells; and development of sensor technologies for detection and analysis of biologically relevant molecular and physical targets in samples from blood, saliva, and other body fluids, or for use in the research laboratory, clinical specimens, and the living body.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: heet@nih.gov.

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Applications for Bioengineering Research Partnerships Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), the National Eye Institute (NEI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) invite applications for grants to support bioengineering research partnerships (BRPs).

A BRP is a multidisciplinary research team that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease, and to understand health and behavior. The partnership must include bioengineering expertise in combination with basic and/or clinical investigators. The field of bioengineering brings a perspective that is valuable for many of today’s biological problems. It integrates principles from a diversity of fields—crossing the boundaries of academia, science, medicine, and industry. The creativity of interdisciplinary teams is resulting in new basic understanding, novel products, and innovative technologies.

Examples of potential research areas include: biomechanics; bioprocessing; bioelectrics, ion channels, and organ function; clinical medicine, therapeutics, and drug delivery; combinatorial approaches to chemistry, materials, genes, and therapeutics; functional genomics including microarray technology, integrated systems, and analysis tools; imaging; nanotechnology; informatics and computational methods; medical implants, biomembranes, sensors, and devices; complex biological systems; organ culture systems and organogenesis; rehabilitation and prostheses; cell and tissue engineering and biomaterials; tissue regeneration; integrative physiology; and drug bioavailability.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1447; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: heet@nih.gov.

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Research on Mechanisms in HIV Dementia and Other CNS Diseases Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) encourage grant applications for research on common immunological and inflammatory mechanisms involved in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) and neurodegenerative and/or autoimmune diseases of the nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS).

Immunologically mediated inflammatory processes are well-known to produce cellular damage in HIV infection and autoimmune diseases such as MS. In addition, there is growing—but still indirect—evidence that inflammatory processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. Although it has been demonstrated that neuronal damage associated with injury or infection initiates apoptotic neuronal death, there is little data in human neurons to define the mechanisms that might be involved. Research is needed to determine the events producing neuronal cell death due to inflammation or infection that may be common to diverse neurodegenerative or autoimmune diseases as well as those that may be unique to HIV-1 infection.

Examples of potential research areas include studies on: common pathways for activation of phagocytes/microglia and astroglia in HAD, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative disorders; common glial responses to chemokines, cytokines, or other inflammatory agents that have been identified as occurring in HAD, MS, or AD; the role of chemokine receptors in the normal function of the brain; the role of glial cells in providing neural protection both in infection and in immune-mediated injury; identification of any common alterations in blood-brain barrier permeability found in HAD, MS, or AD; the interaction of HIV-1 with other infectious agents; possible common histopathological and histochemical changes in neurons, microglia, or astroglia that may be found in neurodegenerative disorders, MS, or HAD using material from brain, animal models, or tissue culture; the role of noninfectious environmental agents in modulating activation of macrophages/microglia and astroglia during the progression of HAD, MS, or AD; excitotoxicity or increased oxidative stress and their role in producing the apoptosis observed in HAD and AD; and susceptibility genes that may be common to individuals developing HAD, MS, or AD.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Applications for Research on the Role of Microglia

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) invite applications for research grants on the role of microglia in normal and abnormal immune responses in the nervous system.

Microglia are a relatively under-recognized, widely distributed cell population within brain parenchyma constituting about 1 to 2 percent of all cells. They are well-known to neuropathologists because they harbor agents including viruses such as HIV-1, treponema pallidum, fungi, and prions during sub-acute or chronic central nervous system (CNS) infections. The ability of microglia to harbor HIV-1 has excited new interest in these cells. As the major infected CNS cell, they play a key role in the development of AIDS dementia possibly by production of toxic factors following infection, or more directly by being unable to provide normal metabolic support for neurons.

Examples of potential research include studies to: define the relationship between the various types of microglia and macrophages and their cells of origin within and without the nervous system; define phenotypic markers that characterize microglia, distinguishing between microglial types and states of activation; investigate mechanisms of activation of microglia and their relationships to activation of T cells; delineate the contribution of microglia to the development of autoimmunity of the CNS via antigen presentation or production of specific cytokines; advance studies of the contributions of peripheral blood monocytes and macrophages to the presence of infected resident microglia; investigate the ability of microglia to elaborate chemokines and cytokines and to express receptors for chemokines and cytokines; investigate contributions of perivascular microglia to the entry of T cells and blood macrophages into the CNS across the blood-brain barrier; investigate the role of microglia in diseases such as multiple sclerosis and HIV infections, including the etiology of AIDS dementia; and study the potential of microglia to serve as therapeutic tools for delivery of drugs, enzymes, trophic factors, or genes into the CNS.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A. P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients With Alzheimer's Disease

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with mild to moderate dementia for a clinical trial of an experimental compound. This trial will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD.

Eligible patients must be between the ages of 40 and 90, otherwise healthy, and ambulatory, and they must be off all antidementia medications for 1 month. All treatment-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

To refer eligible patients, physicians should send a letter of referral and case summary to Dr. Thomas Chase, Chief, Experimental Therapeutics Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C106, 10 Center Dr. MSC 1406, Bethesda, MD 20892-1406; fax: (301) 496-6609. Please call Kimberly Mosby with any questions at (301) 496-4604 or 1-800-362-3479.

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Patients with Amnesia Sought for Cognitive Neuroscience Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior are seeking patients with severe isolated memory disorders due to anoxia, encephalitis, stroke, and other neurological or behavioral disorders. Amnesia patients who are otherwise intellectually unimpaired are especially needed.

Patients should be 18 to 65 years old and without immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Exceptions to this age range may be made given extraordinary clinical presentation. Only patients residing in the United States are eligible to participate in these studies.

The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and will include neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, and related evaluations. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, Medical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior are seeking patients with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration for cognitive neuroscience studies.

Eligible patients should be mild to moderately affected, between the ages of 18 and 70, and have no other current significant disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440; Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; email: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Cortical Myoclonus Needed

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with cortical myoclonus for participation in a controlled therapeutic trial of transcranial magnetic brain stimulation.

The trial will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All trial-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Stephanie Vogel, Patient Care Coordinator, Human Motor Control Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N234, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0600.

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NINDS Seeks Adults with Focal Frontal Lesions

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek adults with frontal lobe lesions for a longitudinal, prospective study of cognitive function.

To be eligible, patients must be between the ages of 16 and 70 and have a single focal lesion of the frontal lobes. Some of the possible causes of such frontal lesions include: brain abscess, embolic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, tumor, partial surgical resection, arteriovenous malformation, congenital hypoplasia, aplasia porencephalic cysts, and penetrating head injuries. Patients will not be eligible if they have ongoing, severe medical illness or other problems precluding successful serial follow-up. A partial list of exclusion criteria includes history of: generalized or multifocal brain injury, mental retardation, precocious puberty, severe closed head trauma, elevated intracranial pressure, radiation therapy, intractable epilepsy, neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage, congenital hydrocephalus from any cause, or the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Studies to be done at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, include magnetic resonance imaging, neurologic examination and history, and cognitive testing. Records of all studies and evaluations will be made available to the referring physician. All study-related expenses and certain travel expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: jg40b@nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Adults with Focal Frontal Lesions

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking adults with frontal lobe lesions for a longitudinal, prospective study of cognitive function.

To be eligible, patients must be between the ages of 16 and 70 and have a single focal lesion of the frontal lobes. Some of the possible causes of such frontal lesions include: brain abscess, embolic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, tumor, partial surgical resection, arteriovenous malformation, congenital hypoplasia, aplasia porencephalic cysts, and penetrating head injuries. Patients will not be eligible if they have ongoing, severe medical illness or other problems precluding successful serial follow-up. A partial list of exclusion criteria includes history of: generalized or multifocal brain injury, mental retardation, precocious puberty, severe closed head trauma, elevated intracranial pressure, radiation therapy, intractable epilepsy, neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage, congenital hydrocephalus from any cause, or the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Studies to be done at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, include magnetic resonance imaging, neurologic examination and history, and cognitive testing. Records of all studies and evaluations will be made available to the referring physician. All study-related expenses and certain travel expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, Medical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Frontal Lobe Dementia Needed

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducting neurobehavioral studies are seeking patients with progressive dementia diagnosed as Pick's disease, frontal lobe dementia, progressive aphasia, or lobar atrophy of the frontal lobes. Patients with radiological evidence of focal atrophy of the frontal lobes are particularly needed.

Eligible patients must not have concurrent immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, Medical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Frontal Lobe Dementia Needed

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducting neurobehavioral studies seek patients with progressive dementia diagnosed as Pick's disease, frontal lobe dementia, progressive aphasia, or lobar atrophy of the frontal lobes. Patients with radiological evidence of focal atrophy of the frontal lobes are particularly needed.

Eligible patients must not have concurrent immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: jg40b@nih.gov.

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Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy or Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Sought

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) for an experimental treatment trial. The study will test an experimental drug's ability to ameliorate the immune dysregulation induced by HTLV-1. Testing of this drug will be carried out in compliance with FDA guidelines.

Eligible patients must be at least 16 years of age, meet diagnostic criteria for HAM/TSP, and be negative for HIV, HCV, and hepatitis B surface antigen. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Joan Eaton, RN, CRNP, Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5B16, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0064; fax: (301) 402-0373; email: eatonj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for an experimental treatment trial. The study will test an experimental drug's ability to reduce disease activity as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Testing of this drug will be carried out in compliance with FDA guidelines.

Eligible patients must be 18 to 65 years old, have relapsing/remitting or secondary progressive MS, and be taking Avonex or Betaseron for at least a 6-month period and continuing to have exacerbations. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's recent medical records to Joan Eaton, RN, CRNP, Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5B16, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0064; fax: (301) 402-0373; email: eatonj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Accepts Organ Donations for Multiple Sclerosis Research

In the Neuroimmunology Branch of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) multiple sclerosis (MS) research has been ongoing for the past 30 years. Studying the pathology of brain tissue is a vital part of this research, which may enable us to determine the cause of MS.

Many people have expressed interest in organ donation for the purpose of MS research. Gifts of brain and spinal cord from those who have a diagnosis of MS are invaluable to the further understanding of this disease.

For more information, physicians should contact Joan Eaton, RN, CRNP, or Jennifer McCartin, RN, Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5B16, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0064; fax: (301) 402-0373; email: eatonj@ninds.nih.gov.

The Neuroimmunology Branch is grateful for your contribution to continuing research in multiple sclerosis.

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Patients with Neuroacanthocytosis Sought for Cognitive Neuroscience Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior are seeking patients with neuroacanthocytosis (X-linked [McLeod syndrome], non-X-linked, and sporadic patients are eligible) to examine the role of the basal ganglia in this disease.

Eligible patients must be referred by a physician, should be ambulatory, and must be able to travel to Bethesda, MD, for testing. They should present with acanthocytosis either in the setting of the McLeod phenotype or in association with neurological signs such as neuromyopathy or cerebral involvement. Patients with abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig) or neuroaxonal dystrophy (Hallervorden-Spatz) are not eligible.

The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and will include experimental neuropsychological testing, functional and structural neuroimaging, and a neurological evaluation. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Adrian Danek, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-402-6395; e-mail: daneka@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior are seeking patients with progressive supranuclear palsy for cognitive neuroscience studies.

Eligible patients should be mild to moderately affected, between the ages of 18 and 70, and have no other current significant disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440; Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; email: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Seizures Sought for Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients age 5 and older with uncontrolled partial and secondary generalized seizures for participation in studies of experimental antiepileptic drugs and transcranial magnetic stimulation. NINDS scientists are also seeking patients with seizures for studies of brain mapping with PET and MRI scans. Younger children with new onset seizures may be eligible for some studies.

Patients will be screened to determine eligibility. The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD 20892-1408; telephone: (301) 496-1505.

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People with Seizures Sought for Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek people age 5 and older with seizures for participation in research studies. The scientists are testing a non-invasive procedure called transcranial magnetic stimulation for seizure treatment, and are studying brain mapping with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.

Younger children with new-onset seizures may be eligible for some studies. The studies may last several months, with an inpatient stay of up to two weeks, and 10-15 outpatient visits of about an hour each. Screening will determine eligibility. People with medical problems that require treatment in addition to seizures may be excluded.

The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH. There is no cost for participation or for any tests associated with the research. The studies are carried out in compliance with testing and safety standards of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

For more information, physicians should contact Ingrid Caldwell, Patient Care Coordinator, at 301-496-1923, or Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD 20892-1408; telephone: 301-496-1505; fax: 301-402-2871.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Stroke for Study of Motor Function Recovery

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking stroke patients for participation in studies to test two interventions geared to improve recovery of motor function and to identify the brain areas associated with motor recovery if it occurs.

Participants must be older than 18 years of age and have had a stroke at least 6 months ago that affected movements on the right side of the body. The studies will include inpatient rehabilitation therapy, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic stimulation, and cognitive and neuroimaging testing. The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter, a copy of the patient's hospital medical records, and a copy of the patient's last brain MRI or CT scan to: Elaine Considine, Patient Care Coordinator, or Dr. George Wittenberg, Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N234, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0600; fax: (301) 402-1007.

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Patients with Syringomyelia Sought for Study of Physiology

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with syringomyelia for studies of the pathophysiology of the disorder. Patients will undergo testing both before and after receiving surgical treatment for this condition.

To be eligible, patients must be 18 to 70 years old and must have syringomyelia associated with a pathologic process at the craniocervical junction, such as Arnold-Chiari malformation. Prior surgery does not exclude patients from the trial, but patients who are pregnant or are suffering from bleeding disorders will not be accepted. This study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD. All treatment-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Edward H. Oldfield, Chief, Surgical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D37, 10 Center Drive MSC 1414, Bethesda, MD 20892-1414; telephone: (301) 496-5728.

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Patients with Upper or Lower Extremity Amputations Sought for Study

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are seeking patients with upper or lower extremity amputations to participate in studies of reorganization of motor and sensory functions.

Patients with and without phantom sensations or phantom pain are eligible. The studies are noninvasive and may include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic stimulation, electroencephalography (EEG), and evaluations using scales of pain and phantom sensations. The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Elaine Considine, Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N234, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: (301) 496-0600; fax: (301) 402-1007.

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