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Funding News - NINDS Notes - April 2003


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Articles:

Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:



Applications for Academic Research Enhancement Awards Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for academic research enhancement awards (AREA). This announcement is made together with 21 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).* The AREA program is intended to support new and continuing health-related research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible schools and components of domestic institutions. The program will enable qualified scientists to receive support for small-scale research projects, and is intended to create a research opportunity for scientists and institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH programs that support the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. Examples of research topics of particular interest include: development, neurotrophic factors, cognition, epilepsy, stroke, cerebrovascular disorders, neuropathic pain, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular disorders, brain tumors, autism, and genetic disorders of the nervous system.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Randall Stewart, AREA Grant Coordinator, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2135, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: rs416y@nih.gov.

For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-03-053.html.

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NINDS Establishes Human Genetics Repository

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recently awarded a contract to establish the NINDS Human Genetics Repository-a genetic resource center for human gene discovery for neurological disorders. The purpose of the repository is to develop genetic resources that can be shared by the research community, and to encourage the research efforts of established scientists, junior investigators, and scientists with novel approaches.

Genetic studies of neurological disorders are increasing in number and complexity. During the last decade, many genes that cause single-gene neurological diseases have been identified. For many neurological disorders, however, complex genetics play a role, and progress in identifying genes that affect susceptibility and outcome has been slow. Such disorders may be caused by multiple genes, or by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Genetic studies of these disorders require a large and diverse sample and accompanying information base. For complex diseases in which single gene effects are modest, sharing is often essential to obtain sample sizes sufficient for statistical analysis. A repository of DNA samples, cell lines, and accompanying clinical and pedigree data is an invaluable resource for the neuroscience community.

Sharing eases the rapid replication of new findings, stimulates multidisciplinary research involving clinical and basic scientists, and provides resources for new investigators to enter an area of genetic research. The repository will protect the rights of research participants and ensure that maximum use is made of their contributions by decreasing duplicative data collection efforts. It also clarifies discrepancies among results obtained from different data sets.

The NINDS contract for collecting, storing, characterizing, and distributing biomaterials for the repository was awarded to the Coriell Institute for Medical Research (CIMR). The repository will receive samples and clinical data including pedigree, diagnostic, and other information from investigators studying epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson's disease; process and store blood samples to prepare DNA samples and viable cell lines; and distribute cell lines, DNA samples, and accompanying clinical diagnostic, pedigree, and other data to eligible investigators.

The repository is available for immediate receipt of genetic resources from investigators who wish to submit samples from individuals with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and stroke, and is expected to expand to include other neurological disorders in the future as well. As a service of the repository, investigators who submit samples will in turn receive cell lines and DNA samples on those disorders for no charge and will be eligible for withdrawal of other stored samples (following a waiting period) for a modest fee.

Investigators who wish to arrange for submission and cell line creation, or who would like information regarding ongoing sample collections, should contact Cynthia Royds, project manager for the NINDS repository at Coriell (at croyds@arginine.umdnj.edu).

For general information about the NINDS repository and to discuss the specific goals of an ongoing or future project in this context, interested persons should contact Dr. Katrina Gwinn-Hardy at kg127a@nih.gov. The NINDS is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in Bethesda, Maryland, and is the nation's primary supporter of biomedical research on the brain and nervous system.

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Applications for Bioengineering Research Grants Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages applications for exploratory or developmental bioengineering research grants. This announcement is made together with 15 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Bioengineering integrates physical, chemical, or mathematical sciences and engineering principles into biological, medical, behavioral, or health studies. It advances fundamental concepts, creates knowledge from the molecular to the organ systems level, and develops innovative biologics, materials, processes, implants, devices, and informatics approaches for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, patient rehabilitation, and strategies for improving health.

Examples of potential areas of research interest include: development of molecular probes for imaging of structure or function; new imaging modalities; organ culture systems; biomaterials or engineered tissues; development or evaluation of prostheses; medical implants, biomembranes, or sensors; tools for robotic or non-invasive surgery; microarrays or other tools for genomics; combination or other techniques for high-throughput screening; techniques for bioprocessing; biomechanics of tissue injury or repair, and standing or walking; interactions between biomaterials and living systems; drug, gene, or cellular therapeutic delivery systems; and interaction of magnetic or other fields with biological systems.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Associate Director for Science Program, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Democracy II, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 200, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5469; telephone: 301-451-4772; fax: 301-480-4973; e-mail: heetderkw@mail.nih.gov.

For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-03-058.html.

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Applications for Bioengineering Research Partnerships Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for grants to support bioengineering research partnerships (BRPs). This announcement is made together with 16 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

A BRP is a multidisciplinary research team that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease, and to understand health and behavior. The partnership must include bioengineering expertise in combination with basic and/or clinical investigators. The field of bioengineering brings a perspective that is valuable for many of today's biological problems. It integrates principles from a diversity of fields-crossing the boundaries of academia, science, medicine, and industry. The creativity of interdisciplinary teams is resulting in new basic understanding, novel products, and innovative technologies.

Applications for BRPs should focus on areas of basic, applied, behavioral, or clinical research in bioengineering that supports the missions of the NIH institutes and centers and where progress is likely to make a significant contribution to improving human health.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: August 22, 2003.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Associate Director for Science Program, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Democracy II, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 200, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5469; telephone: 301-451-4772; fax: 301-480-4973; e-mail: heetderkw@mail.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-032.html.

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NINDS Invites Applications for Clinical Trial Planning Grants

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for clinical trial planning grants.*

The purpose of the clinical trial planning grant is to support the organization of the elements necessary for the successful implementation of high-risk, complex, or large-scale clinical trials. This initiative is intended to (a) allow for early peer review of the rationale and design of the proposed clinical trial; (b) provide support for the development of a detailed manual of operations and procedures; and (c) provide support to develop essential elements of a clinical trial. This announcement is not intended to obtain preliminary data or to conduct pilot studies to support the rationale for the clinical trial.

NINDS encourages high-quality clinical research to evaluate interventions to treat and prevent neurological disorders. NINDS has established the clinical trial planning grant because extensive efforts are required to develop a detailed study protocol and to organize an effective research group. After the basic design and rationale for a neurological treatment trial has been reviewed, the clinical trial planning grant supports the development of specific elements which will be essential for conducting a successful full-scale clinical trial, including adequate plans for recruitment of patients, experimental design and protocols, data management, analytical techniques, facilities, administrative procedures, and collaborative arrangements.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. John Marler, Associate Director for Clinical Trials, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2216, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-9135; fax: 301-480-1080; e-mail: jm137f@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-051.html.

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Applications for Research on Gene Discovery for Complex Neurological and Neurobehavioral Disorders Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) encourage grant applications for research on gene discovery for complex neurological and neurobehavioral disorders.*

Genetic factors contribute to many neurological and neurobehavioral diseases. During the last decade, genes that cause many single-gene neurological disorders, such as Huntington's disease, neurofibromatosis, and Rett syndrome, have been identified. For these disorders, familial inheritance patterns follow the rules of Mendelian segregation. For many common disorders-including stroke, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-inheritance patterns are more complex, and progress in identifying genes that affect susceptibility and disease outcome has been slow. The goal of this program announcement (PA) is to promote the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to genetically complex disorders affecting the nervous system, or to the phenotypes that underlie these disorders.

Potential areas of research interest include studies involving the initial collection of biomaterials and clinical information from a patient population or the subsequent application of genetic or molecular strategies for gene localization. Possible methodologies include, but are not limited to, traditional linkage analysis, sib-pair and affected-pedigree-member methods, case-control or family-based association studies, linkage disequilibrium mapping in genetically isolated populations, candidate gene analysis, cytogenetic studies to identify chromosomal abnormalities associated with a disorder, and positional cloning. For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2142, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5745; fax: 301-401-1501; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-03-092.html.

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Applications on Neuroinformatics Sought for the Human Brain Project

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages human brain project applications for research on neuroinformatics. This announcement is made together with 10 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).*

The human brain project is a broadly based federal research initiative. Its goal is to develop novel and innovative web-based capabilities to store, analyze, share, collaborate, integrate, resolve, model, visualize, and interpret the complex experimental data from basic and clinical nervous system research. Neuroinformatics combines neuroscience and informatics research to develop and apply advanced tools and approaches essential for understanding the structure, function, and development of the healthy nervous system-from the genetic to whole-systems level-as well as neurological disorders.

This program announcement consists of two parts: phase I and phase II. Potential topics of research interest for phase I include research feasibility studies on advanced technologies and novel ways to acquire, store, retrieve, manage, analyze, visualize, manipulate, integrate, synthesize, disseminate, and share data about neuroscience research, including tools for electronic collaboration. Research projects for phase II consist of refinement of phase I activities and may include expanded beta testing; improvements and refinement of web-based capabilities; development of appropriate models and simulation capabilities; development of neuroscience grids where necessary and appropriate; and integration with other related web sites through the creation of federations.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Yuan Liu, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2110, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-480-2424; e-mail: yl5o@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-035.html.

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Research on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites grant applications for nanoscience and nanotechnology research that has the potential to make valuable contributions to biology and medicine. This announcement is made together with 10 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Nanoscience and nanotechnology refer to research at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels, at the length scale of approximately 1-100 nanometers. The purpose of this initiative is to stimulate cross-cutting, integrative research in these areas of science and technology.

Examples of potential areas of research interest include: fundamental principles for nanosystem design, integration, and application to develop tools to measure and image biological processes in health and disease; design of artificial nanostructures that could be used within the cell as replacements for defective naturally occurring nanostructures or to serve other therapeutic purposes not found in normal cells; studies on the integration of active biological molecules such as molecular motors and membrane pumps with engineered systems to create "living" machines for use in biologic, diagnostic, or therapeutic studies; development of new methods for high-throughput cell or molecular sorting or sensing using nanotechnology-based particles or tools; development of nanoparticles that enable controlled release of therapeutic agents, antibodies, genes, and vaccines into targeted cells; development of nanotechnologies to achieve functional replacement of tissue architectures; and use of nanoscience and nanotechnology approaches for controlling interfaces between prosthetic and extracorporeal devices and tissues.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. William Heetderks, Associate Director for Science Program, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), Democracy II, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 200, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5469; telephone: 301-451-4772; fax: 301-480-4973; e-mail: heetderkw@mail.nih.gov..

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-045.html.

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Novel Genetic Methods to Map Research on Novel Genetic Methods to Map Functional Neuronal Circuits and Synaptic Change Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research to develop new genetic methods and technologies to map functional neuronal circuits and synaptic changes in the mammalian nervous system. This announcement is made together with 8 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

Emerging genetic and transgenic technologies can be used to single out functionally related cells or neuronal populations for analysis or intervention. This program announcement supports the development of genetic-based tools to map neuronal interconnectivity, monitor functional changes, or drive functional changes within neuronal circuits as the first step in an effort by the NIH to create integrated genomic and functional connectivity maps of the mammalian nervous system. Understanding the pattern of interconnections of specific neural cells is essential to understanding their roles in nervous system function and dysfunction.

Examples of potential research areas of interest include: development of cell-type specific promoters or improvement of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to specifically label or isolate distinct neuronal classes and their projections for the purpose of mapping functional neuronal circuits; methods for detecting electrical activity in mammalian neurons by optical recording from genetically encoded reporters; methods for detecting neuronal activity in deep brain structures using genetically encoded reporters particularly suited for in vivo applications; methods for visualizing the activity of signal transduction pathways in neurons and neuronal circuits using genetically encoded reporters or other fusion constructs; genetic-based methods for the persistent labeling of neurons over prolonged periods of time in order to follow plastic changes in morphology, connections, or function; genetic-based methods for visualizing dynamic changes in neuronal connections, such as pulse-chase labeling of synapses; and genetic-based methods for controlling or driving neural activity or signaling responses in defined neuronal populations.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Laura A. Mamounas, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-480-1080; e-mail: lm92t@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-007.html.

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Applications to Establish Parkinson's Disease Research Centers Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) encourage grant applications to establish Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Centers of Excellence.*

The purpose of the initiative is to encourage additional research opportunities and discoveries that will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, based on a better understanding of the fundamental cause(s) of the disease.

Potential topics of research interest include: clinical studies of PD, parkinsonism, and related disorders; the natural history of PD and related disorders including prospective clinical assessment, neuropathological analysis, and banking of brain tissue from individuals with PD who agree to participate in an autopsy program; studies to address the non-motor aspects of PD; development of therapeutic technology related to PD; epidemiological and genetic studies to identify risk and susceptibility factors; studies on gene-environment interactions as risk factors for PD; translational research; cellular and molecular mechanisms of cell injury and death in PD and related neurodegenerative disorders; studies of the structure, function, composition, role, and possible interrelationship of proteins and inclusion bodies implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and related disorders; development of animal models and their use for investigation of pathophysiology and efficacy of therapeutic intervention; development and function of the neural circuitry involved in PD and related disorders, including those functions affected by the disease process or treatment; molecular and cell biology of the dopaminergic systems and other relevant neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and their function in the brain; exploration of trophic factors and their receptors that promote the survival of dopamine neurons in the adult brain; neuronal reconstruction using engineered cell lines that are relevant to PD; and markers of PD onset, progression, and response to therapy.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Eugene J. Oliver, Program Director, Neurodegeneration Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2203, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5680; fax: 301-480-1080; e-mail: eo11c@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-004.html.

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Applications on Systems and Methods for Small Animal Imaging Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) invite applications for small business innovation research (SBIR) and small business technology transfer research (STTR) awards to support research and development of small animal imaging devices and methods that can be applied to research on diverse biological or disease processes.*

Recent discoveries in genomics and molecular and cell biology have led to the development and wide use of small animal models of human disease. One of the limitations with the use of these models is the need to sacrifice large numbers of animals for ex vivo tissue and molecular analysis. Imaging instrumentation and methods that permit imaging on the scale of small animals offer an opportunity to address this problem by enabling noninvasive investigations of biological processes in vivo.

Potential areas of research interest include: development of small animal imaging systems that extend the capabilities of existing devices through improved spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity, and throughput for screening applications; development of improved methods for image reconstruction and processing, and of analytical tools for image analysis; development of complementary devices and methods for improved animal handling including motion compensation and correction, imaging agent administration, blood sampling, anesthesia delivery, and animal maintenance and monitoring during imaging; and in vivo investigations of imaging agents and high-affinity molecular probes for the imaging of biological processes in small animals, including improved methods for probe delivery and targeting.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2131, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: daofen_chen@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-03-031.html.

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Applications for Research on Mind-Body Interactions and Health Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for infrastructure grants to support research on mind-body interactions and health. This announcement is made together with 15 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

"Mind-body interactions and health" refers to the relationships among cognition, emotions, personality, social relationships, and health. The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to encourage applications designed to enhance the quality and quantity of mind-body and health research, and to develop new capabilities to advance mind-body and health research through innovative approaches.

Potential areas of research interest include: development of research strategies for stroke prevention and appropriate management of recurrent stroke (behavior modification, lifestyle changes, role of psychosocial variables such as stress, depression, coping skills, and social support/social isolation); development and evaluation of rehabilitation interventions for neurological disorders (including stroke, traumatic brain injury [TBI], and neurodegenerative disorders) and physiological, behavioral, and social pathways influencing rehabilitation outcomes; and behavioral and psychosocial intervention in randomized clinical trials of neurological disorders (such as epilepsy, stroke, TBI, and neurodegenerative disorders) and interactions of behavioral and biomedical treatments.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 16, 2003.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Emmeline Edwards, Program Director, Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2109, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-9964; fax: 301-402-2060; e-mail: ee48r@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OB-03-005.html.

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Applications on Pharmacological Approaches to Enhance Neuromodulation in Rehabilitation Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) request applications for research on pharmacological approaches to enhance neuromodulation in rehabilitation.*

Pharmacological compounds have the potential to enhance functional recovery in rehabilitation, especially when used with behavioral and physical therapy. The goal of this request for applications (RFA) is to encourage research to examine strategies for using pharmacological agents to enhance rehabilitation. This research should focus on the rehabilitative phase, rather than on preventing injury, minimizing acute pathology, or reducing ongoing degeneration.

Potential research areas of interest include: anatomical correlates of functional recovery, plasticity, and adaptation to evaluate pharmacological interventions; use of pharmacotherapy to accelerate recovery of sensory or motor functions following disease or injury; interaction of pharmacological compounds with behavioral and/or physical therapy approaches; use of pharmacological approaches to enhance the efficacy of or compliance with behavioral and physical therapy regimes; improved models for evaluating the interaction of neuroactive compounds and therapeutic approaches in rehabilitation; and studies of focal delivery of pharmacological agents to target specific areas of the central nervous system and studies to investigate the effects of localized neuromodulation.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: October 25, 2002.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Daofen Chen, Program Director, Channels, Synapses, and Circuits Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2131, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1917; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: daofen_chen@nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-02-023.html.

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