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Funding News - NINDS Notes - March 2002


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Applications for Bioengineering Research Grants Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications to support bioengineering research grants (BRGs). This announcement is made together with 19 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

BRGs support multi-disciplinary research-performed in a single laboratory or by a small number of investigators-that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease, and to understand health and behavior. Many of today's biomedical problems are best addressed using a multi-disciplinary approach that extends beyond traditional biological and clinical science. Bioengineering integrates principles from a diversity of fields-crossing the boundaries of academia, science, medicine, and industry.

Applications for BRGs should focus on areas of basic, applied, behavioral, or clinical research in bioengineering that supports the missions of the NIH institutes and centers and where progress is likely to make a significant contribution to improving human health.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-402-1080; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-011.html.

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Applications for Bioengineering Research Partnerships Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for grants to support bioengineering research partnerships (BRPs). This announcement is made together with 18 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

A BRP is a multidisciplinary research team that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease, and to understand health and behavior. The partnership must include bioengineering expertise in combination with basic and/or clinical investigators. The field of bioengineering brings a perspective that is valuable for many of today's biological problems. It integrates principles from a diversity of fields-crossing the boundaries of academia, science, medicine, and industry. The creativity of interdisciplinary teams is resulting in new basic understanding, novel products, and innovative technologies.

Applications for BRPs should focus on areas of basic, applied, behavioral, or clinical research in bioengineering that supports the missions of the NIH institutes and centers and where progress is likely to make a significant contribution to improving human health.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: August 12, 2002.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-402-1080; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-010.html.

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Research to Develop Courses on Stem Cell Culture Techniques Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) invites applications for research grants to develop, conduct, evaluate, and disseminate short-term courses on laboratory research techniques for human embryonic stem cell lines. This announcement is made together with 10 other components of the federal government.*

Recent scientific discoveries about the ability of human embryonic stem cells to proliferate in an undifferentiated state and to be directed to develop into a wide array of cell types present opportunities for research that aims to repair or replace cells and restore vital functions. Advancing these discoveries will require dissemination of technical knowledge and skills in cell culture techniques across a variety disciplines and disease research areas. Currently, there is a shortage of investigators who have experience with this research tool. The objective of this announcement is to support the development of short-term courses on skills and techniques applied in human embryonic stem cell research.

Topic areas of emphasis include: proper freeze-thaw cycling, repetition of the preparation of cell passages, and the cryopreservation, vitrification, storage, and shipment of cells; use of co-culture techniques to support maintenance of the undifferentiated cell state; use of cell separation procedures including fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS); review of basic good laboratory practices for use of human biological materials including proper exposure precautions, safe methods of disposal, and record keeping; establishment of xenograft procedures for the use of animal models for in situ culturing and differentiation of stem cells and the pathological examination of tumor growth; employment of standard detection methods for infectious organisms or other contaminants; introduction to microarray techniques for DNA and transcriptional profiling; application of single cell recording methods for measurement of electrical potential; and cross-training of techniques used in other applications of stem cell biology tools.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Arlene Chiu, Program Director, Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9525; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-480-1080; email: chiua@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-054.html.

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Research to Develop PET and SPECT Ligands for Brain Imaging Encouraged (SBIR Award)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) invite Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications to develop novel radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging in human brain.*

The use of radiotracers for imaging molecular events in preclinical and clinical studies is essential for understanding the biological basis of normal brain function and the pathophysiology of brain disorders. These radiotracers will be used for neuroimaging as well as potential biological markers and surrogate endpoints for translational and clinical research, drug discovery and development, and clinical trials.

This initiative is intended to stimulate the development of radioligands for molecular targets that are of broad interest to the scientific community. Use of these radioligands is expected to accelerate research on identifying and characterizing the neural circuits and pathways implicated in the pathophysiology of brain disorders, and to facilitate the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new compounds as potential therapeutic agents. Molecular targets for which radioligands are needed include receptors, transporters, enzymes, and intracellular targets.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Technology Development Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1779; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-028.html.

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Research on Immune System and Brain Function Links Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) encourage applications for research to study neuroimmune molecules and mechanisms involved in regulating normal and pathological central nervous system (CNS) function.*

Immune molecules (such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors) and cells can modulate brain function through multiple signaling pathways originating from peripheral and CNS cells. The potent effects of cytokine molecules in the brain are mediated through multiple signaling pathways. However, details regarding the extent, routes, or mechanisms whereby immune signaling molecules affect the brain under either normal conditions or during immune challenge are largely unexplored.

Examples of potential research include studies to: develop and characterize cytokine receptor selective ligands; identify sensitive markers for determining the effects of pre- and post-natal infection on normal brain development; develop neuroimaging tools for studying cytokine effects within specific brain regions; develop non-invasive tools for examining blood-brain barrier permeability to immune molecules and cells and antibodies; examine the potential role of abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier in determining neuroimmune responses; identify and characterize receptors and signal transduction mechanisms responsible for cytokine and chemokine actions in the brain; examine the effects of cytokines and chemokines on gene expression and activation of neurotransmitters, neurohormones, and other signaling molecules in the brain; examine the developmental expression of cytokines, chemokines, receptors, and related signaling molecules in the brain; examine the impact of immune molecules in well-characterized cellular and behavioral model systems; and employ functional imaging in both basic and clinical studies to determine the effects of individual cytokines and more complex, infection or autoimmune-related immune challenges on brain function.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2134, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9521; telephone: 301-496-1431; fax: 301-480-2424; email: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-045.html.

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Neurotechnology Research, Development, and Enhancement Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) invite grant applications for studies to research and develop innovative technologies, methodologies, or instrumentation for basic and clinical studies of the brain in human or non-human animals. Also encouraged are applications to research, develop, and significantly enhance existing technologies that are important to understand the brain.*

One of the most complex systems in biomedicine is the brain. Despite this, neuroscience is rapidly advancing, with important discoveries coming to light almost daily. This program announcement seeks to advance neuroscience research through development of neurotechnologies or novel tools and approaches for the study of the brain. Such tools may include those used for clinical assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of brain disorders.

Examples of tools useful for neuroscience include but are not limited to: microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices used for monitoring neuron function in slice and culture preparations; amplifiers that are small and light enough to be worn by mice for recording neural activity from many neurons; devices for non-invasive diagnosis and precise identification of pathogens involved in central and peripheral neural infectious diseases; tools for real-time analysis of neurophysical events; telemetry devices small and light enough to be worn by mice for transmitting data; software to translate neuroimaging data from one data format into another; computational approaches to analyzing video data; and probes of brain gene expression that can be imaged non-invasively.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2207, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-402-1080; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-003.html.

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Research on Plasticity of Human Stem Cells in the Nervous System Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) invite applications for research on plasticity and behavior of human stem cells and regulation of their replication, differentiation, and function in the nervous system.*

Stem cell research offers enormous potential for treating a host of congenital, developmental, psychiatric, and degenerative diseases for which there are no cures. Researchers report that stem cells present in adult, non-neuronal tissues also appear to show surprising plasticity or versatility. Before therapies can be designed using human stem cells, there must be an understanding of how "plastic" or malleable the different classes of cells are, the environmental cues that drive their choice of fates, and how reversible the fates are.

Examples of potential areas of research interest include studies to: compare the mitotic potential and fates of different types of human stem and progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo in the central nervous system (CNS); determine the functional properties of human progenitor cells implanted during progressive developmental stages of the host CNS, and with aging; compare the behavior of human stem cells with that of their non-human counterparts in vitro and in vivo; investigate the ability of different human stem cells to revert to a more plastic, multipotent state, under normal conditions and following injury; examine changes in gene and protein expression as human stem and progenitor cells differentiate along specific neuronal and glial lineages; develop assays and markers that permit accurate and reliable characterization of the state of differentiation of human stem or neural precursor cells; use animal model systems of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders for screening and comparing the functional capabilities of implanted human stem cells and their progeny; and assess the behavior of host cells in response to the short-term and long-term presence of transplanted human stem cells and/or their derivatives.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Repair and Plasticity Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2206, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9525; telephone: 301-496-1447; fax: 301-480-1080; email: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-025.html.

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Research on Probes for Microimaging the Nervous System Encouraged

(SBIR Award)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and the Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) encourage applications for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects on the research and development of probes useful in imaging the structure and function of the brain and other parts of the nervous system.*

An emerging area of scientific opportunity is the design and use of probes to study structure and function at the molecular and subcellular level in living cells. Research and development of these technologies hold the promise of providing scientists with the capabilities to track the ebb and flow of signal transduction cascades, protein-protein interactions, movement of subcellular elements within cells, and other dynamic events.

Potential areas of research interest include: bioengineering of small-molecule, sterically benign probes that can be genetically linked to proteins that play important roles in cell function; research, development, and engineering of probes that can report quantitative information regarding particular molecular or subcellular events or structures; research and development of probes that attach to specific sites on proteins which are observable through multiple modalities; and research and development of caged molecules that provide temporally and spatially controlled release of molecular probes.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Technology Development Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-1779; fax: 301-402-1501; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-029.html.

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Applications for Genetics Research Training Programs Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the Fogarty International Center (FIC), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) request applications to establish international collaborative genetics research training programs.*

The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to create innovative research training programs within existing scientific collaborations between investigators from both developed and developing countries in an effort to build a group of scientists, health professionals, and academicians with expertise in human genetics, and to create a sustainable research environment at the collaborating institutions of the developing countries.

Examples of potential research and training priorities include: application of genetic epidemiological methods in family-based association and linkage designs, population-based studies that correlate genetic variation with disease risk and studies of gene-environment interactions; design and implementation of genetic epidemiological studies of complex diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental disorders, alcoholism and drug abuse, neurological diseases and asthma, as well as individual variation in drug response (pharmaco-genomics); assessments of the population impact of gene variation, disease, death and disability - including surveillance systems; development of tools, models, and algorithms that could facilitate assessment, utility, and priority for genetic services in developing countries; assessment of the genetic susceptibility to environmental exposures, including nutritional factors, pollutants, chemical toxins, and substance abuse, on the initiation and progression of disease; and research on the ethical, legal, and social implications of performing human genetic research.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: March 25, 2002.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-402-1501; fax: 301-496-5748; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-TW-02-001.html.

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Applications on the Mechanisms of the Placebo Effect Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for research on the underlying mechanisms of the placebo effect. This announcement is made together with 11 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to stimulate research to define the underlying mechanisms by which a placebo leads to its ultimate physiological and psychological effects.

Examples of potential areas of research include: investigations on how psychosocial effects that may be related to placebo (such as meaning, personality, social learning, conditioning, expectation, memory, emotion, etc.) may lead to biological changes and eventually to final placebo effects; studies to clarify a related question on how pharmacological or other medical treatments interact with psychosocial effects to enhance placebo responses; investigations to expand placebo research by using the full palette of contemporary biomedical techniques; better animal models to investigate specific types of placebo effects such as those related to analgesia, stress, depression, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis, Pavlovian conditioning, expectancy, etc.; studies using human subjects, both healthy volunteers and patients with defined clinical conditions, under controlled situations, to clarify the biological pathways leading to specific placebo responses; and studies to better characterize subjective, conditioned physiological, and neurobiological effects and cognitive expectancies associated with placebos in human drug abusers and in preclinical studies investigating drug abuse and addiction, and to compare these effects produced by placebos with the known effect of drugs of abuse.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: April 11, 2002.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2116, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-9964; fax: 301-402-2060; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AT-02-002.html.

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Applications for Neurodegenerative Disease Assays Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for research to develop neurodegenerative disease assays for high throughput drug screening and chemical genetics.*

The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to encourage the use of high throughput drug screening and chemical genetics in neurodegeneration research by funding the development of assays that may be adapted for high throughput approaches.

Assays proposed for this RFA should represent mechanisms associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and triplet repeat disorders such as Huntington's disease. Appropriate assays include: toxicity of disease-causing proteins in neuronal cell lines or primary neuronal cultures; toxicity of disease-causing proteins in yeast or other model organisms; modulation of expression of disease-causing or neuroprotective genes, including effects on transcription, translation, or splicing; cell-based assays of activity, processing, or turnover of disease-causing or neuroprotective proteins; and biochemical assays of activity of disease-causing or neuroprotective proteins.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: March 26, 2002.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Neurodegeneration Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2204, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: 301-496-5680; fax: 301-480-1080; e-mail: funding@ninds.nih.gov.

*For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the NIH web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-012.html.

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Patients with Cervical or Focal Hand Dystonia Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with cervical or focal hand dystonia who are receiving botulinum toxin injections for a study of a medication called amlodipine. This study will examine whether amlodipine can improve the effect of botulinum toxin injections for this movement disorder, which causes abnormal postures and disrupted movements.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Barbara Karp, Office of the Clinical Director, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5S209, 10 Center Drive MSC 1428, Bethesda, MD 20892-1438; telephone: 301-496-0150; fax: 301-480-2973.

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Patients with Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration for cognitive neuroscience studies.

Eligible patients should be mild to moderately affected, between the ages of 18 and 70, and have no other current significant disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440; Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Adults with Focal Frontal Lesions

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek adults with frontal lobe lesions for a longitudinal, prospective study of cognitive function.

To be eligible, patients must be between the ages of 16 and 70 and have a single focal lesion of the frontal lobes. Some of the possible causes of such frontal lesions include: brain abscess, embolic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, tumor, partial surgical resection, arteriovenous malformation, congenital hypoplasia, aplasia porencephalic cysts, and penetrating head injuries. Patients will not be eligible if they have ongoing, severe medical illness or other problems precluding successful serial follow-up. A partial list of exclusion criteria includes history of: generalized or multifocal brain injury, mental retardation, precocious puberty, severe closed head trauma, elevated intracranial pressure, radiation therapy, intractable epilepsy, neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage, congenital hydrocephalus from any cause, or the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Studies to be done at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, include magnetic resonance imaging, neurologic examination and history, and cognitive testing. Records of all studies and evaluations will be made available to the referring physician. All study-related expenses and certain travel expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Frontal Lobe Dementia Needed

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducting neurobehavioral studies seek patients with progressive dementia diagnosed as Pick's disease, frontal lobe dementia, progressive aphasia, or lobar atrophy of the frontal lobes. Patients with radiological evidence of focal atrophy of the frontal lobes are particularly needed.

Eligible patients must not have concurrent immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Generalized Dystonia

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek families with DYT1 dystonia (the most common type of familial generalized dystonia) to participate in a study. The purpose of this study is to understand how the brain controls movement and how this process is altered in DYT1 dystonia.

Eligible subjects include those with DYT1 positive gene status with dystonia, DYT1 carriers who have positive gene status but have no symptoms of dystonia, and family members who are non-carriers. The study, which involves a painless technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and lasts approximately 1-2 hours, will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Fiona Molloy, Office of the Clinical Director, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5N236, 10 Center Drive MSC 1428, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1428, telephone: 301-594-0937.

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Patients with Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Sought for Study

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek adults and children 12 years of age or older with neuronopathic Gaucher disease who are currently being treated with enzyme replacement therapy for a study of an investigational oral treatment for the disorder. It is hoped that this drug will be an effective treatment for the neurological symptoms of this disease.

Patients will be screened to determine eligibility. Initially, the duration of the study will be 12 months. Eligible patients will be required to visit the clinic at regular 3-month intervals. The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Raphael Schiffmann, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 3D03, 10 Center Drive MSC 1260, Bethesda, MD 20892-1260, telephone: 301-496-1465; 1-800-258-0299 (toll-free); fax: 301-480-8354.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Phantom Pain

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with phantom pain due to upper limb amputation to participate in a study. Phantom pain refers to the sensation of pain felt by patients who have had a limb amputated. The treatment of phantom pain is often disappointing and is unable to provide adequate relief to patients. The area of the brain involved is called the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and is found on the opposite side of the amputated limb.

This study will use low frequency (1 Hz) transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to decrease the excitability of the PPC on the opposite side of the amputated limb. Researchers believe that if they can decrease activity in the PPC they may be able to reduce phantom pain.

Eligible patients must be between 18 and 65 years of age, and have had amputation and phantom pain for at least 12 months (pain should be moderate and present at least 8 hours per day, or severe, lasting at least 2 hours per day).

Patients with previous stroke or brain lesions, severe depression, poor motivational capacity, serious cognitive deficits, severe uncontrolled medical problems, a history of seizures or other neurological disorders, severe coronary disease, metal in the cranium except mouth, intracardiac lines, increased intracranial pressure as evaluated by clinical means, and cardiac pacemakers, and those on neuroleptic medications or pregnant, are not eligible to participate.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter and a copy of the patient's hospital medical records to Shashi Ravindran, R.N., M.P.H., Clinical Research Coordinator, Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C40, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: 301-402-1916; fax: 301-480-2286.

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Patients with Seizures Sought for Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients age 5 and older with uncontrolled partial and secondary generalized seizures for participation in studies of experimental antiepileptic drugs and transcranial magnetic stimulation. NINDS scientists also seek patients with seizures for studies of brain mapping with PET and MRI scans. Younger children with new-onset seizures may be eligible for some studies.

Patients will be screened to determine eligibility. The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD 20892-1408; telephone: 301-496-1505.

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Patients with Seizures Sought for Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients age 5 and older with uncontrolled partial and secondary generalized seizures for participation in studies of experimental antiepileptic drugs and transcranial magnetic stimulation. NINDS scientists also seek patients with seizures for studies of brain mapping with PET and MRI scans. Younger children with new-onset seizures may be eligible for some studies.

Patients will be screened to determine eligibility. The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. William Theodore, Chief, Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1408, Bethesda, MD 20892-1408; telephone: (301) 496-1505.

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NINDS Seeks Healthy Volunteers for Spinal Cord Study

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek normal healthy volunteers for a study on the enhancement of motor learning in the human spinal cord using different training tasks. The study will determine whether practice of a complex locomotor pattern results in more prominent behavioral gains (measured as control of stepping speed) than practice of a simple locomotor pattern, and will evaluate performance improvements in a daily life fundamental locomotor function, such as control of stepping speed, associated with different motor training tasks. This knowledge is important for the design of rational and effective rehabilitation strategies after brain and spinal cord lesions.

The study will include locomotor training (stepping), peripheral nerve electrical stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

Participants eligible for the study are normal healthy volunteers who are able to walk for 15 minutes based on neurological and physical exams. A partial list of ineligibility criteria includes persons with a history of heart condition, unresponsive arterial hypertension, diabetes, chronic back pain, sciatica, peripheral neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, active joint deformity of arthritic origin, alcohol or drug abuse, psychiatric disorder, head injury with loss of consciousness, epilepsy, cardiac pacemakers, intracardiac lines, and implanted medication pumps.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, contact Shashi Ravindran, R.N., M.P.H., Clinical Research Coordinator, Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C40, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: 301-402-1916; fax: 301-480-2286.

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NINDS Seeks Patients for a Stroke Study

Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with stroke for participation in a study. The study will examine the behavioral consequences of transient inactivation of the ipsilateral cortex on motor performance of the affected arm in chronic stroke patients with complete and incomplete motor recovery. The results from this study will provide fundamental information on the role of the ipsilateral cortex in recovery of motor function after chronic stroke.

Eligible patients include those with single ischemic hemispheric lesions at least 12 months after stroke and with a severe paresis (below MRC grade 2) of the affected arm initially. An anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan will be acquired at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) if a recent one (within 6 months) is not available. Healthy normal volunteers who are willing and able to perform the tasks will also be included in the study, and will receive neurological and physical exams to ensure their healthy conditions.

A partial list of exclusion criteria includes patients with more than one stroke, bilateral motor impairment, cerebellar or brainstem lesions, and a history of severe alcohol or drug abuse, psychiatric illness like severe depression, poor motivational capacity, or severe language disturbances, particularly of receptive nature or with serious cognitive deficits, and those unable to perform the task (wrist or elbow flexion at least MRC grade 2).

The study will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should send a referral letter, a copy of the patient's hospital medical records, and a copy of the patient's last brain MRI or computed tomography (CT) scan to Shashi Ravindran, R.N., M.P.H., Clinical Research Coordinator, Human Cortical Physiology Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C40, 10 Center Drive MSC 1430, Bethesda, MD 20892-1430; telephone: 301-402-1916; fax: 301-480-2286.

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Patients with Syringomyelia Sought for Study of Physiology

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with syringomyelia for studies of the pathophysiology of the disorder. Patients will undergo testing both before and after receiving surgical treatment for this condition.

To be eligible, patients must be 18 to 70 years old and must have primary spinal syringomyelia. This may be due to a focal lesion obstructing the spinal subarachnoid space or from an intramedullary tumor. Prior surgery does not exclude patients from the trial, but patients who are pregnant or are suffering from bleeding disorders will not be accepted. This study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD. All treatment-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Edward H. Oldfield, Chief, Surgical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D37, 10 Center Drive MSC 1414, Bethesda, MD 20892-1414; telephone: 301-496-5728.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Tourette Syndrome

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with Tourette syndrome for neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

Eligible patients should be 9 to 65 years old. Patients will undergo one or more of the above studies for which they qualify and feel comfortable with.

The studies will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Alicja Mason at 301-402-2983, or Dr. Fernando Pagan at 301-402-3494.

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