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Funding News - NINDS Notes - March 2001


Contents:

Archive folder iconHistorical Data

  • The information on this page is for historical and research purposes only.
  • For the most current NINDS funding announcements, please see the NINDS list of Active Funding Initiatives or Follow Us on Twitter for the latest funding news.
Program Announcements (Grant Applications) Sought on:

Requests for Applications Sought on:

Volunteers Needed for Studies on:



Research on Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) encourage grant applications for research on autism and autism spectrum disorders.

Autism and autism spectrum disorders share a cluster of impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, and the presence of stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities. These complex disorders are of lifelong duration and affect multiple aspects of development, learning, and adaptation in the community, and, thus, represent a pressing public health need. The etiologies of these disorders are poorly understood, but are thought to include genetic, metabolic, immunological, infectious, and environmental causes.

Potential areas of research interest include: epidemiology, early identification and diagnosis, genetic studies, brain mechanisms, communication skills, cognitive science, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacological/biological intervention.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Deborah Hirtz, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2212, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5821; fax: (301) 480-1080; email: dh83f@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-051.html.

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Research on Biomarkers and Clinical Endpoints in Pediatric Clinical Trials Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) invite grant applications for research on biomarkers and clinical endpoints in pediatric clinical trials.

In the last 3 years, major drug legislation and regulatory events have occurred that will profoundly affect pediatric drug development in the future. An increase in the number of drug studies has brought to light the problem of finding enough children to conduct efficacy trials. Another identified problem is the difficulty in establishing efficacy and safety of drugs used in the treatment of chronic childhood conditions because of the lack of adequate markers to establish disease severity, recurrence, and response to therapy.

Potential areas for research include: identification, development, validation, and/or extrapolation from adult trials of biomarkers of diagnosis, prognosis, and disease activity; study of treatment effects on additional outcome variables not included in the adult trial; development of genetic biomarkers and genetic databases using samples and data from trial subjects; estimation of the magnitude of treatment effect on validated adult biomarkers that reflect underlying pathogenesis; development of statistical methodology to establish the validity of surrogate endpoints in pediatrics; and development of biomarkers for pain assessment in infants that are more sensitive and specific than current pain scales and can be used to determine drug effects accurately.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Giovanna Spinella, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2132, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5745; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: gs41b@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-043.html.

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Applications on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Human Genetics and Genomic Research (Educational Approaches) Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) encourage grant applications for research on innovative educational approaches to increase knowledge and understanding of genetics and genomic research and its ethical, legal and social implications.

The NIH is currently engaged in a research effort called the Human Genome Project, which is designed to characterize the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. Knowing the entire sequence of the human genome and understanding more about genetic variation among individuals and groups will raise a number of ethical, legal, and social issues. Many of these issues may be of special concern to individuals from diverse communities who traditionally have not been involved in genetics and genomic research, or who may have been adversely affected in the past by certain types of research.

Examples of potential research include studies to: examine the issues surrounding the completion of the human DNA sequence and the study of human genetic variation; examine the issues raised by the integration of genetic technologies and information into health care and public health activities; examine issues raised by the integration of knowledge about genomics and gene-environment interactions into non-clinical settings; explore the ways in which new genetic knowledge may interact with a variety of philosophical, theological, and ethical perspectives; and explore how socioeconomic factors, gender, and concepts of race, ethnicity, and culture influence the use and interpretation of genetic information, the utilization of genetic services, and the development of policy.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-134.html.

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Applications on Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Human Genetics and Genomic Research Sought

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) encourages grant applications for research on the ethical, legal, and social implications of the discovery of new genetic technologies and the availability and use of genetic information resulting from human genetics and genomic research. This announcement is made together with 9 other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).*

The NIH is currently engaged in a research effort called the Human Genome Project, which is designed to characterize the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. Knowing the entire sequence of the human genome and understanding more about genetic variation among individuals and groups will raise a number of ethical, legal, and social issues. Many of these issues may be of special concern to individuals from diverse communities who traditionally have not been involved in genetics and genomics research, or who may have been adversely affected in the past by certain types of research.

Examples of potential research include studies to: examine the issues surrounding the completion of the human DNA sequence and the study of human genetic variation; examine the issues raised by the integration of genetic technologies and information into health care and public health activities; examine issues raised by the integration of knowledge about genomics and gene-environment interactions into non-clinical settings; explore the ways in which new genetic knowledge may interact with a variety of philosophical, theological, and ethical perspectives; and explore how socioeconomic factors, gender, and concepts of race, ethnicity, and culture influence the use and interpretation of genetic information, the utilization of genetic services, and the development of policy.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-133.html.

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Research on the Muscular Dystophies Encouraged

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) encourage grant applications for research on therapeutic and pathogenic approaches to the muscular dystrophies.

The muscular dystrophies—which are characterized by weakness and wasting of muscles—affect thousands of people in the United States. Though research has recently revealed much about genetic defects associated with many forms of muscular dystrophy, treatment for these diseases has not changed significantly. There is a need to learn more about the pathogenesis of the disease and ways to treat affected people.

Examples of potential research include studies to: examine genetic heterogeneity and search for additional candidate genes; examine genotype/phenotype correlations within and between families; develop improved diagnostic procedures; improve imaging techniques to better diagnose and monitor muscle disease; study pathogenic mechanisms leading from gene defects to muscular dystrophy phenotypes; clarify the role of inflammatory changes that accompany tissue degeneration; explore further development of new types of therapy, including gene transfer and gene correction; study muscle stem cells and their therapeutic possibilities; explore pharmacologic interventions; pursue the development and sharing of appropriate animal models for muscular dystrophies; study the involvement of apoptotic cell death in the process of muscle fiber degeneration; and improve therapeutic value of protein expression from transplanted myoblasts.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Giovanna Spinella, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2132, Bethesda, MD, 20892; telephone: (301) 5745; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: gs41b@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this program announcement, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-01-041.html.

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Applications for Research on Mechanisms in Immunomodulation Trials Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) request applications for research studies on mechanisms in immunomodulation trials.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to support mechanistic research studies in clinical trials of immunomodulatory interventions for immune system-mediated diseases, including asthma and allergy, graft failure in solid organ and stem cell transplantation, and autoimmune diseases.

Examples of potential areas of research include: quantitation of disease-related, autoreactive, or alloreactive lymphocytes using methods such as MHC/peptide tetramers, chimeric antibodies, or very early activation antigens; analysis of autoreactive or alloreactive cells by PCR for expression of genes implicated in immunity or inflammation, or by FACS for cell surface markers that identify functions; assessment of reagents that can identify newly recognized populations of regulatory T cells which appear to be altered in autoimmune disease; identification and evaluation of cytokine and cytokine receptor polymorphisms and analysis for genetic linkage to disease; use of high throughput technologies to identify and evaluate genes activated in disease sites; identification of useful surrogate markers by correlation of the above parameters with disease activity and/or response to intervention; comparison of samples from peripheral blood with those from sites of disease; and assessment of the presence of molecular evidence of potential causative environmental agents.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: Applications will be accepted monthly, on the 9th of each month.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-01-001.html.

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Applications on Microarray Centers for Research on the Nervous System Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request applications for support of microarray research centers.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to establish up to 3 microarray research centers that will support gene expression profiling in the nervous system through the application of microarray technologies, and will function as a consortium, providing reagents, services, and training to the neuroscience community on a fee-for-service basis.

These centers will provide services to NINDS-funded and NIMH-funded investigators to support microarray analyses on the nervous system. The centers may produce standard, nervous system-specific arrays designed for general use, or custom arrays suited to the needs of smaller groups of investigators. The centers will run array experiments, including hybridization reactions, array reading, and data analyses, and will also advise and train the neuroscience community on the effective use of microarray experimental techniques in an effort to disseminate expertise throughout the neuroscience community.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 13, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, Program Analyst, Technology Development Cluster, NINDS, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1779; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: tm208y@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-02-001.html.

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Applications on Sex-Based Differences in the Immune Response Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society request applications to identify, characterize, and define differences in the immune response between males and females.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to support multidisciplinary research on sex-based differences in immune responses that may be important in autoimmune diseases (including multiple sclerosis, rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis, as well as other immune-mediated diseases) and the underlying mechanisms and clinical significance of such differences.

Areas of potential research include studies of: mechanisms that underlie sex-based differences in susceptibility to and severity of autoimmunity, infectious diseases, or other immune-mediated diseases; molecular basis for differences between males and females in the immune response, including the adaptive, innate, and mucosal immune systems; differences between males and females in adaptive immune responses; differences in triggering or response mechanisms in innate immunity that may be responsible for the sexual dimorphism observed in response to pathogens; differences in the immune response to infections of the central and peripheral nervous systems; mechanisms of sex hormone regulation of the immune response in normal and disease states in males and females; the effect of pregnancy on the immune response and identification of postpartum changes that are responsible for either protection from or provocation of autoimmunity; mechanisms of micochimerism in the etiopathogenesis of autoimmune disease; and the genetic basis for sex differences in autoimmunity.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 10, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. A.P. Kerza-Kwiatecki, Neural Environment Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2115, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1431; fax: (301) 402-2060; e-mail: ak45w@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-01-005.html.

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Applications for Specialized Neuroscience Research Programs on Health Disparity in HIV and the Nervous System Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) request applications for specialized neuroscience research programs on health disparity in HIV and the nervous system.

The purpose of this request for applications (RFA) is to augment and strengthen the research capabilities of faculty, students, and fellows at minority institutions by supporting the development of new, and/or the enhancement of ongoing, basic and clinical neuro-AIDS-related research projects and programs. These awards will support individuals at minority institutions who collaborate with one or more established NIH-supported investigators at research intensive organizations.

Examples of potential areas of research include: development of strategies to promote the dissemination and/or transfer of information on the neurological complications of HIV infection from research to service providers; development of strategies to prevent the spread of HIV infections in the central and peripheral nervous systems; establishment of population-based studies to evaluate promising new therapies that could impact the progression of AIDS-associated dementia; studies on mechanisms underlying the neurological and neurobehavioral aspects of HIV infection; identification of surrogate markers which will allow rapid measurement of neuropathogenic damage and treatment success; refinement of brain imaging techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV-associated neurological disease; elucidation of the role of the immune system, intracellular signaling pathways, receptors, and cytokines in HIV neurotropism and pathogenicity in HIV-associated dementia; investigations of signal transduction which may induce recruitment and proliferation of inflammatory cells and further cytokine/chemokine dysfunction; studies of drugs of abuse that result in neuro-AIDS complications; and investigation of possible common links among neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and HIV-dementia, where microglial activation is a common pathway for neural destruction.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: April 13, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Alfred Gordon, Associate Director for Minority Health and Research, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2151, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-3102; fax: (301) 594-5929; e-mail: ag38x@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-01-009.html.

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Applications for Research on Tools for Insertional Mutagenesis in the Mouse Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for research on tools for insertional mutagenesis in the mouse. This request is made together with 10 other NIH components.*

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to solicit proposals for the development of tools and techniques to establish random and targeted sequence-tagged insertion libraries of embryonic stem (ES) cells that can be used to generate mutant mice in which the expression of the tagged gene could be controlled temporarily and spatially.

Examples of potential areas of research include: feasibility studies for the establishment of sequence-tagged insertional libraries of C57BL/6 ES cells in which the expression of the tagged gene can be controlled temporarily or spatially; development of new or modified site-specific recombination systems for efficient random and targeted insertional mutagenesis and enhanced control of conditional expression; development of novel vectors that allow imaging of specific cell types or tissues, metabolic activity, or other cellular or physiological functions; invention of efficient systems for transposon tagging in mammalian systems for the wide use of the scientific community; development of vectors for identification of promoters and enhancers that could be used for tissue-specific and temporal expression of recombinases and for the study of gene expression patterns; and methods to automate the processing of large numbers of clones and to identify the sites of insertion.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: April 11, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Gabrielle Leblanc, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2133, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-5745; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: gl54h@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-01-011.html.

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Applications for Research on Tools for Insertional Mutagenesis in the Mouse (SBIR/STTR) Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) requests applications for research on tools for insertional mutagenesis in the mouse. This request is made together with 14 other NIH components.*

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to solicit Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Research (SBIR/STTR) proposals for the development of tools and techniques to establish random and targeted sequence-tagged insertion libraries of embryonic stem (ES) cells that can be used to generate mutant mice in which the expression of the tagged gene could be controlled temporarily and spatially.

Examples of potential areas of research include: feasibility studies for the establishment of sequence-tagged insertional libraries of C57BL/6 ES cells in which the expression of the tagged gene can be controlled temporarily or spatially; development of new or modified site-specific recombination systems for efficient random and targeted insertional mutagenesis and enhanced control of conditional expression; development of novel vectors that allow imaging of specific cell types or tissues, metabolic activity, or other cellular or physiological functions; invention of efficient systems for transposon tagging in mammalian systems for the wide use of the scientific community; development of vectors for identification of promoters and enhancers that could be used for tissue-specific and temporal expression of recombinases and for the study of gene expression patterns; and methods to automate the processing of large numbers of clones and to identify the sites of insertion.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: April 11, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Thomas Miller, SBIR Program Analyst, Technology Development Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2139, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 496-1779; fax: (301) 402-1501; e-mail: tm208y@nih.gov.

*For a full list of supporting NIH components and a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-01-012.html.

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Applications on Xenopus Tropicalis as a Genetic Model Requested

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the Trans-NIH Xenopus Working Group, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) request applications for research to examine the feasibility of using Xenopus tropicalis for standard genetic manipulation.

The objective of this request for applications (RFA) is to solicit applications to develop critical research tools and resources for Xenopus tropicalis. The amphibian has a long and illustrious history as a major system for elucidating cellular and developmental processes. The Xenopus has been the predominant amphibian used because it possesses unique advantages including the production of large embryos in large numbers, external development, and rapid development.

Potential areas of research include insertional mutagenesis and chemical mutagenesis. Phenotypes of interest include alterations in: embryonic patterning; organogenesis and organ function; limb formation and patterning; the expression pattern of known genes; nervous system development and function, and potential models of neurological disorders; and toxicity (due to environmental/industrial chemicals/agents).

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE: July 11, 2001.

For more information, potential applicants should contact Dr. Robert Finkelstein, Program Director, Neurogenetics Cluster, NINDS, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2136, Bethesda, MD 20892; telephone: (301) 402-1501; fax: (301) 496-5748; e-mail: rf45c@nih.gov.

For a more detailed description of this RFA, please visit the web site at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-01-008.html.

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Patients with Amnesia Sought for Cognitive Neuroscience Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with severe isolated memory disorders due to anoxia, encephalitis, stroke, and other neurological or behavioral disorders. Amnesia patients who are otherwise intellectually unimpaired are especially needed.

Patients should be 18 to 65 years old and without immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Exceptions to this age range may be made given extraordinary clinical presentation. Only patients residing in the United States are eligible to participate in these studies.

The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and will include neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, and related evaluations. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Blepharospasm

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with blepharospasm for a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the drug mexiletine.

Eligible patients must have had their last botulinum toxin treatment at least 3 months prior to enrollment in the study, and must have a statement from their primary physician giving medical clearance including an EKG within the past 12 months. Patients with a history of cardiac disease are not eligible. Participants in the study will be asked to stop any medication that may interact with mexiletine.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, contact Dr. Fiona Molloy at (301) 594-0937 or Dr. Kirsten Zeuner at (301) 402-3499.

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Patients with Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration for cognitive neuroscience studies.

Eligible patients should be mild to moderately affected, between the ages of 18 and 70, and have no other current significant disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440; Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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NINDS Seeks Patients with Essential Tremor

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with essential tremor for a study of the pathogenesis of the disorder.

Patients enrolled in the study will undergo nerve conduction tests, electromyograms, and blood testing.

The study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, contact Dr. Kirsten Zeuner at (301) 402-3499 or Dr. Fiona Molloy at (301) 594-0937.

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NINDS Seeks Adults with Focal Frontal Lesions

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek adults with frontal lobe lesions for a longitudinal, prospective study of cognitive function.

To be eligible, patients must be between the ages of 16 and 70 and have a single focal lesion of the frontal lobes. Some of the possible causes of such frontal lesions include: brain abscess, embolic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, tumor, partial surgical resection, arteriovenous malformation, congenital hypoplasia, aplasia porencephalic cysts, and penetrating head injuries. Patients will not be eligible if they have ongoing, severe medical illness or other problems precluding successful serial follow-up. A partial list of exclusion criteria includes history of: generalized or multifocal brain injury, mental retardation, precocious puberty, severe closed head trauma, elevated intracranial pressure, radiation therapy, intractable epilepsy, neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage, congenital hydrocephalus from any cause, or the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Studies to be done at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, include magnetic resonance imaging, neurologic examination and history, and cognitive testing. Records of all studies and evaluations will be made available to the referring physician. All study-related expenses and certain travel expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Frontal Lobe Dementia Needed

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducting neurobehavioral studies seek patients with progressive dementia diagnosed as Pick's disease, frontal lobe dementia, progressive aphasia, or lobar atrophy of the frontal lobes. Patients with radiological evidence of focal atrophy of the frontal lobes are particularly needed.

Eligible patients must not have concurrent immune, respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease. Those enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies. The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: (301) 496-0220; fax: (301) 480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Neuroacanthocytosis Sought for Cognitive Neuroscience Studies

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with neuroacanthocytosis (X-linked [McLeod syndrome], non-X-linked, and sporadic patients are eligible) to examine the role of the basal ganglia in this disease.

Eligible patients must be referred by a physician, should be ambulatory, and must be able to travel to Bethesda, MD, for testing. They should present with acanthocytosis either in the setting of the McLeod phenotype or in association with neurological signs such as neuromyopathy or cerebral involvement. Patients with abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig) or neuroaxonal dystrophy (Hallervorden-Spatz) are not eligible.

The studies will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, and will include experimental neuropsychological testing, functional and structural neuroimaging, and a neurological evaluation. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Adrian Danek, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-402-6395; e-mail: daneka@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Syringomyelia Sought for Study of Physiology

Investigators at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) seek patients with syringomyelia for studies of the pathophysiology of the disorder. Patients will undergo testing both before and after receiving surgical treatment for this condition.

To be eligible, patients must be 18 to 70 years old and must have syringomyelia associated with a pathologic process at the craniocervical junction, such as Arnold-Chiari malformation. Prior surgery does not exclude patients from the trial, but patients who are pregnant or are suffering from bleeding disorders will not be accepted. This study will take place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD. All treatment-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Edward H. Oldfield, Chief, Surgical Neurology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5D37, 10 Center Drive MSC 1414, Bethesda, MD 20892-1414; telephone: (301) 496-5728.

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Patients with Urbach-Wiethe Disease Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with Urbach-Wiethe disease. Patients enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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Patients with Urbach-Wiethe Disease Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with Urbach-Wiethe disease. Patients enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: jg40b@nih.gov.

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Patients with Urbach-Wiethe Disease Sought

Scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) studying neurobehavior seek patients with Urbach-Wiethe disease. Patients enrolled in the study will undergo neuropsychological testing and brain imaging studies.

The study will be conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. All study-related expenses will be paid by the NIH.

For more information, physicians should contact Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief, Cognitive Neuroscience Section, NINDS, NIH, Building 10, Room 5C205, 10 Center Drive MSC 1440, Bethesda, MD 20892-1440; telephone: 301-496-0220; fax: 301-480-2909; e-mail: grafmanj@ninds.nih.gov.

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