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NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page

Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet

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What is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous system, which transmits information from the brain and spinal cord to every other part of the body.

More than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified, each with its own characteristic set of symptoms, pattern of development, and prognosis. Impaired function and symptoms depend on the type of nerves -- motor, sensory, or autonomic -- that are damaged.  Some people may experience temporary numbness, tingling, and pricking sensations, sensitivity to touch, or muscle weakness. Others may suffer more extreme symptoms, including burning pain (especially at night), muscle wasting, paralysis, or organ or gland dysfunction. Peripheral neuropathy may be either inherited or acquired. Causes of acquired peripheral neuropathy include physical injury (trauma) to a nerve, tumors, toxins, autoimmune responses, nutritional deficiencies, alcoholism, medical procedures, and vascular and metabolic disorders. Acquired peripheral neuropathies are caused by systemic disease, trauma from external agents, or infections or autoimmune disorders affecting nerve tissue. Inherited forms of peripheral neuropathy are caused by inborn mistakes in the genetic code or by new genetic mutations.

Is there any treatment?

No medical treatments exist that can cure inherited peripheral neuropathy. However, there are therapies for many other forms.  In general, adopting healthy habits -- such as maintaining optimal weight, avoiding exposure to toxins, following a physician-supervised exercise program, eating a balanced diet, correcting vitamin deficiencies, and limiting or avoiding alcohol consumption -- can reduce the physical and emotional effects of peripheral neuropathy.  Systemic diseases frequently require more complex treatments.

What is the prognosis?

In acute neuropathies, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, symptoms appear suddenly, progress rapidly, and resolve slowly as damaged nerves heal. In chronic forms, symptoms begin subtly and progress slowly. Some people may have periods of relief followed by relapse. Others may reach a plateau stage where symptoms stay the same for many months or years. Some chronic neuropathies worsen over time, but very few forms prove fatal unless complicated by other diseases. Occasionally the neuropathy is a symptom of another disorder.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to peripheral neuropathies in laboratories at the NIH and also support additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country.  Current research projects funded by the NINDS involve investigations of genetic factors associated with hereditary neuropathies, studies of biological mechanisms involved in diabetes-associated neuropathies, and investigations exploring how the immune system contributes to peripheral nerve damage.  Neuropathic pain is a primary target of NINDS-sponsored studies aimed at developing more effective therapies for symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Some scientists hope to identify substances that will block the brain chemicals that generate pain signals, while others are investigating the pathways by which pain signals reach the brain.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Peripheral Neuropathy Clinical Trials

Organizations

Column1 Column2
American Chronic Pain Association (ACPA)
P.O. Box 850
Rocklin, CA   95677-0850
ACPA@theacpa.org
http://www.theacpa.org
Tel: 916-632-0922 800-533-3231
Fax: 916-652-8190

Neuropathy Association
60 East 42nd Street
Suite 942
New York, NY   10165-0999
info@neuropathy.org
http://www.neuropathy.org
Tel: 888-PN-FACTS (888-763-2287)
Fax: 212-692-0668

National Kidney & Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)
3 Information Way
Bethesda, MD   20892-3580
nkudic@info.niddk.nih.gov
http://www.niddk.nih.gov
Tel: 301-654-4415 800-891-5390

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association (CMTA)
2700 Chestnut Parkway
Chester, PA   19013-4867
info@cmtausa.org
http://www.cmtausa.org/
Tel: 610-499-9264 800-606-CMTA (2682)
Fax: 610-499-9267

Muscular Dystrophy Association
3300 East Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ   85718-3208
mda@mdausa.org
http://www.mda.org
Tel: 520-529-2000 800-572-1717
Fax: 520-529-5300

American Diabetes Association
1701 North Beauregard Street
Alexandria, VA   22311
askada@diabetes.org
http://www.diabetes.org
Tel: 800-DIABETES (342-2383) 703-549-1500

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC)
1 Information Way
Bethesda, MD   20892-3560
ndic@info.niddk.nih.gov
http://www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov
Tel: 301-654-3327 800-860-8747

Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy
485 Half Day Road
Suite 200
Buffalo Grove, IL   60089
info@tffpn.org
http://www.foundationforpn.org
Tel: 877-883-9942
Fax: 847-883-9960

Related NINDS Publications and Information
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Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892



NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated July 22, 2014