Disorders A - Z:   A    B   C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Y    Z

Skip secondary menu

NINDS Neurotoxicity Information Page


Table of Contents (click to jump to sections)


Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker


What is Neurotoxicity?

Neurotoxicity occurs when the exposure to natural or manmade toxic substances (neurotoxicants) alters the normal activity of the nervous system. This can eventually disrupt or even kill neurons, key cells that transmit and process signals in the brain and other parts of the nervous system. Neurotoxicity can result from exposure to substances used in chemotherapy, radiation treatment, drug therapies, and organ transplants, as well as exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury, certain foods and food additives, pesticides, industrial and/or cleaning solvents, cosmetics, and some naturally occurring substances. Symptoms may appear immediately after exposure or be delayed. They may include limb weakness or numbness; loss of memory, vision, and/or intellect; headache; cognitive and behavioral problems; and sexual dysfunction. Individuals with certain disorders may be especially vulnerable to neurotoxicants.

Is there any treatment?

Treatment involves eliminating or reducing exposure to the toxic substance, followed by symptomatic and supportive therapy.

What is the prognosis?

The prognosis depends upon the length and degree of exposure and the severity of neurological injury. In some instances, exposure to neurotoxicants can be fatal. In others, patients may survive but not fully recover. In other situations, many individuals recover completely after treatment.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports research on disorders of the brain and nervous system such as neurotoxicity, aimed at learning more about these disorders and finding ways to prevent and treat them. Scientists are investigating the role occupational or environmental toxicants have on progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and dementia. Also being studied are the mechanisms that trigger neuroimmune responses in the central nervous system and the possibility that some brain disorders in children may occur when environmental triggers interact with genes.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Neurotoxicity Clinical Trials

Organizations

Column1 Column2
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
National Institutes of Health, DHHS
111 T.W. Alexander Drive
Research Triangle Park, NC   27709
webcenter@niehs.nih.gov
http://www.niehs.nih.gov
Tel: 919-541-3345

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane, CDER-HFD-240
Rockville, MD   20857
http://www.fda.gov
Tel: 301-827-4573 888-INFO-FDA (463-6332)



Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892



NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated February 14, 2007