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NINDS Klüver-Bucy Syndrome Information Page


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What is Klüver-Bucy Syndrome?

Klüver-Bucy syndrome is a rare behavioral impairment that is associated with damage to both of the anterior temporal lobes of the brain. It causes individuals to put objects in their mouths and engage in inappropriate sexual behavior. Other symptoms may include visual agnosia (inability to visually recognize objects), loss of normal fear and anger responses, memory loss, distractibility, seizures, and dementia. The disorder may be associated with herpes encephalitis and trauma, which can result in brain damage.

Is there any treatment?

Treatment is symptomatic and supportive, and may include drug therapy.

What is the prognosis?

There is no cure for Klüver-Bucy syndrome. The disorder is not life-threatening, but the patient can be difficult to manage. With treatment, symptoms may slowly decline.

What research is being done?

NINDS supports and conducts research on neurobehavioral disorders such as Klüver-Bucy syndrome. Much of the research focuses on learning more about these disorders and finding ways to prevent and treat them.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Klüver-Bucy Syndrome Clinical Trials

Organizations

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National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
55 Kenosia Avenue
Danbury, CT   06810
orphan@rarediseases.org
http://www.rarediseases.org
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291

 


Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892



NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated July 2, 2008