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Kennedy's Disease Press Releases

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NIH and NFL tackle concussion research
Monday, Dec 16, 2013
The National Institutes of Health has selected eight projects to receive support to answer some of the most fundamental problems on traumatic brain injury, including understanding long-term effects of repeated head injuries and improving diagnosis of concussions.

Four New Members Appointed to National Neurological Disorders and Stroke Advisory Council
Thursday, Feb 4, 2010
Four New Members Appointed to National Neurological Disorders and Stroke Advisory Council

Small Changes in Protein Chemistry Play Large Role in Huntington’s Disease
Thursday, Dec 24, 2009
In Huntington’s disease, a mutated protein in the body becomes toxic to brain cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that a small region adjacent to the mutated segment plays a major role in the toxicity. Two new studies supported by the National Institutes of Health show that very slight changes to this region can eliminate signs of Huntington’s disease in mice.

Therapy Investigated for ALS May Find New Role in Kennedy’s Disease
Monday, Oct 26, 2009
A growth factor that has generated tides of hope and disappointment for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may turn out to be an effective therapy for a less common disease, Kennedy’s disease.

Study in Mice Links Growth Factor to Hereditary Motor Neuron Disease
Wednesday, Jul 7, 2004
Production of a growth factor in the spinal cord drops just before the onset of symptoms in an animal model of a rare, hereditary motor neuron disease, scientists have found. The findings point to a potential new way of treating this disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders as well.
Fact Sheet

Scientists Identify Gene for Spinocerebellar Ataxia 2
Thursday, Oct 31, 1996
Scientists have identified the gene altered in one of the most common hereditary ataxias, spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2). The discovery allows improved genetic testing and provides new clues about how genetic mutations cause several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease. The findings are reported by three different groups in the November issue of Nature Genetics.

New Type of Trinucleotide Mutation Found in Friedreich's Ataxia
Thursday, Mar 7, 1996
Scientists have identified a new type of trinucleotide repeat mutation that leads to Friedreich's ataxia (FA), a rare childhood neurodegenerative disease. The discovery allows accurate screening for carriers of the disease and may lead to the first effective treatments.

Study Links Critical Enzyme to Huntington's, Other Diseases
Thursday, Feb 29, 1996
For the first time, scientists have linked a critical cellular enzyme to the gene defect found in Huntington's and several other hereditary neurological diseases. The finding provides important clues about how these diseases may develop and suggests that a single therapy eventually may be developed to treat them.

A Hereditary Ataxia Caused by Huntington's-Type "Genetic Stutter"
Wednesday, Jun 30, 1993
Scientists have discovered that another nervous system degenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), has the same type of gene mutation occurring in Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases. In the disease, a normal three-base sequence in the genetic code — cytosine, adenine and guanine, or CAG — is abnormally repeated, according to Drs. Huda Y. Zoghbi, who led one team at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and Harry T. Orr, who headed the other team at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The same CAG repeat was reported earlier this year in Huntington's disease and in 1991 in the very rare Kennedy's disease, also called X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy.