Disorders A - Z:   A    B   C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P    Q    R    S    T    U    V    W    X    Y    Z

Skip secondary menu

NINDS Developmental Dyspraxia Information Page

Synonym(s):   Dyspraxia

Table of Contents (click to jump to sections)


Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker


What is Developmental Dyspraxia?

Developmental dyspraxia is a disorder characterized by an impairment in the ability to plan and carry out sensory and motor tasks. Generally, individuals with the disorder appear "out of sync" with their environment. Symptoms vary and may include poor balance and coordination, clumsiness, vision problems, perception difficulties, emotional and behavioral problems, difficulty with reading, writing, and speaking, poor social skills, poor posture, and poor short-term memory. Although individuals with the disorder may be of average or above average intelligence, they may behave immaturely.

Is there any treatment?

Treatment is symptomatic and supportive and may include occupational and speech therapy, and "cueing" or other forms of communication such as using pictures and hand gestures. Many children with the disorder require special education.

What is the prognosis?

Developmental dyspraxia is a lifelong disorder. Many individuals are able to compensate for their disabilities through occupational and speech therapy.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports research on developmental disorders, such as developmental dyspraxia, aimed at learning more about these disorders, and finding ways to prevent and treat them.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Developmental Dyspraxia Clinical Trials

Organizations

Column1 Column2
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
2200 Research Boulevard
Rockville, MD   20850
actioncenter@asha.org
http://www.asha.org
Tel: 800-638-8255
Fax: 301-571-0457

 


Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892



NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated September 16, 2011