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Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE)



See All Stroke Trials

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, is looking for individuals to participate in clinical studies. Participating in clinical research allows you to play an active role in developing future treatments for many disorders of the brain and nervous system. The information below is designed to help you quickly learn about actively recruiting research studies for which you or someone you know may be eligible.

Description:

More than 750,000 people in the United States suffer from strokes annually, and an estimated 40 percent of people with acute ischemic stroke also have high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Although hyperglycemia is known to be associated with worse recovery for individuals with stroke, it is unclear if treatment interventions intended to bring blood sugar to normal levels can improve recovery without the risk of inducing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels).

SHINE is a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 1400 participants that will include approximately 60 sites across the country.  The trial will evaluate if blood sugar control is safe and effective for improving stroke recovery.  The research sites will be testing the current standard treatment against the new treatment, which involves the administration of a controlled IV insulin infusion therapy within 12 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms.  The therapy lasts for up to three days.

Eligible participants will have diabetes and elevated blood glucose on initial evaluation and will have to get to the hospital very quickly after the start of symptoms.  The study researchers believe that maintaining tight control of blood sugar after a stroke will improve recovery.

Phase: 

Phase 3

Eligibility Criteria:

Please follow this link for trial eligibility information to share with your doctor.

Study Design: 

Interventional, Treatment

Study Locations: 

Multiple US locations

For more information:

Contact: Karen C. Johnston, MD, MSc; Tel: 434-924-5323; Email: kj4v@virginia.edu or Amy Fansler, MPH; Tel: 434-982-6027; Email: acf7h@virginia.edu

Visit: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01369069 or http://www.shinetrial.com

Last Reviewed July 2, 2013