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NINDS Brown-Sequard Syndrome Information Page


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What is Brown-Sequard Syndrome?

Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) is a rare neurological condition characterized by a lesion in the spinal cord which results in weakness or paralysis (hemiparaplegia) on one side of the body and a loss of sensation (hemianesthesia) on the opposite side. BSS may be caused by a spinal cord tumor, trauma (such as a puncture wound to the neck or back), ischemia (obstruction of a blood vessel), or infectious or inflammatory diseases such as tuberculosis, or multiple sclerosis.

Is there any treatment?

Generally treatment for individuals with BSS focuses on the underlying cause of the disorder. Early treatment with high-dose steroids may be beneficial in many cases. Other treatment is symptomatic and supportive.

What is the prognosis?

The prognosis for individuals with BSS varies depending on the cause of the disorder.

What research is being done?

The NINDS supports and conducts a wide range of research on spinal cord disorders such as BSS. The goal of this research is to find ways to prevent, treat, and, ultimately, cure these disorders.

NIH Patient Recruitment for Brown-Sequard Syndrome Clinical Trials

Organizations

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National Spinal Cord Injury Association
75-20 Astoria Blvd
Suite 120
East Elmhurst, NY   11370-1177
info@spinalcord.org
http://www.spinalcord.org
Tel: 800-962-9629
Fax: 866-387-2196

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
55 Kenosia Avenue
Danbury, CT   06810
orphan@rarediseases.org
http://www.rarediseases.org
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291



Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892



NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient's medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

Last updated September 29, 2011